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CGCE Spring 2018 Course Offerings

Updated Class Schedule for Spring 2018

Class Dates: January 22 - May 14, 2018

Registration begins: November 6, 2017

Course information will be added as it becomes available

MOD=Mod Hall, WILSN=Wilson, BATES=-Bates, PAR=Parenzo, ELY=Ely, HMC=Horace Mann Center, WRWRD=Woodward Building

Courses marked with "PR" in the "Prereq" column have prerequisites that must be met before you may enroll.
Hover mouse pointer over Pre-req, Core and course numbers to see pre-reqs, core requirments fulfilled by the course
and course descriptions.

Last updated on Wednesday, October 11, 2017 04:03 PM

Art
Undergraduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
ART 0104-50B(40629)DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS(3.0 )AAPP03/19-05/14ONLINEONLINEB. Keim
ART 0104 - B Session Class Meets March 19 to May 14
ART 0106-501(40639)ART SURVEY: PREHIST-MIDDLE AGE(3.0 )AAPP01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEF. Lund
ART 0107-501(40640)ART SURVEY:RENAISSANCE-PRESENT(3.0 )AAPP01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEI. Imeh
ART 0206-50A(40641)ELECTRONIC PUBLICATION DESIGN(3.0 )AAPP01/22-03/09ONLINEONLINEJ. Wainright
ART 0206 - A Session Class Meets Jan. 22 to March 9
ART 0358-501(40644)AFRICAN AMERICAN ART(3.0 )UDIV01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEI. Imeh
Graduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
ART 0551-501(40645)ST:AFRICAN AMERICAN ART(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEI. Imeh
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Biology
Undergraduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
BIOL 0104-501(41310)
BIOL 0104 Human Biology (4)
Human Biology introduces the structure and function of the human body. Students will study the major systems of the human body, including reproduction, digestion and nutrition, circulation, respiration, nervous and hormonal control and locomotion through examination of and non-invasive experimentation with their own bodies, computer simulations, reading and attending lecture/discussions.
HUMAN BIOLOGY(4.0 )LSCI01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEK. McKeown
BIOL 0106-501(41307)
BIOL 0106 Biology Today (4)
An introduction to the study of cells, cellular reproduction, inheritance and the gene, molecular genetics, and the development of organisms. Concentrates on human genetics and development. Investigates the role of biotechnology in genetics and development.
BIOLOGY TODAY(4.0 )LSCI01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINED. Doe
BIOL 0128-501(41489)
BIOL 0128 Introduction to Organismal, Ecological, and Evolutionary Biology (4)
An introduction to the patterns and processes of evolution. Topics include population genetics, adaptation, evolution, diversity, and ecology. This course will focus on methods of inquiry, collection and analysis of data, and interpretation and presentation of results.
INTRO:ORGAN.,ECOL AND EVOL BIOL(4.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEJ. Hanselman
BIOL 0239-501(41309)
BIOL 0239 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4)
Utilizes a general approach to the human body with emphasis on structure and function to show ways in which the various organ systems interact. The respiratory, circulatory, digestive, endocrine, and urinary systems as well as temperature regulation and fluid balance are studied.
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS II(4.0 )PR01/22-05/14Wed,6:00-10:30PMWILSN-221R. Thompson
Graduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
BIOL 0540-501(41490)
BIOL 540 Environmental Science (3)
The effects of human actions in the environment. How these actions can be directed to maintaining and restoring biological diversity with the goal of human survival in a constantly changing world. A detailed study of how this material can be integrated into the modern secondary school biology curriculum will be required. The lab will include methods of environmental investigation.
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINED. Christensen
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Business Management - Master of Science in Accountancy
Students can register for a course after the first class meeting by permission of instructor only
Graduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
ACCT 0624-501(41644)
ACCT 0624 Advanced Cost Accounting (3)
Course covers advanced treatment of cost accounting topics. Topics may include activity-based costing and management, statistical estimation of cost and revenue behavior, capital budgeting, linear programming, inventory control methods, transfer pricing, performance measurement in decentralized operations, and the impact of technology changes on the managerial structure.
ADVANCED COST ACCOUNTING(3.0 )01/22-05/14Tue,6:30-9:15PMWILSN-400R. Alzubaidi
ACCT 0624 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
ACCT 0627-501(41645)
ACCT 0627 Issues in Accounting for Public Companies (3)
This course explores the recent developments in U.S. and international accounting for public companies. Topics may include issues associated with the globalization of business, consolidations and business combinations, pension plans, financial regulation and financial reporting standards for selected foreign operations, and recent standards set forth by the Securities and Exchange Commission’s Public Companies’ Accounting Oversight Board.
ISS IN ACCTG FOR PUB COMPANIES(3.0 )01/22-05/14Thu,6:30-9:15PMWILSN-400E. Moore
ACCT 0627 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
ACCT 0631-501(41646)
ACCT 0631 Municipal and Fund Accounting (3)
An overview of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) for non-for-profit and government agencies including FASB statements numbers 116 and 117, which have a significant impact on financial reporting for non-profit organizations. The goal is to come to a clear understanding of the accounting and financial principles required by GAAP, the limitations of GAAP financial statements, and what the implications are for the non-profit organization.
MUNICIPAL AND FUND ACCTG(3.0 )01/22-05/14Thu,6:30-9:15PMWILSN-403J. Sarnelli
ACCT 0631 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
MGMT 0632-501(41647)
MGMT 632 Business Law for Accountants (3)
Focuses on the law surrounding commercial transactions, particularly those relevant to accountants and auditors. Topics include contract law, the Uniform Commercial Code, agency law, the major forms of doing business including partnerships, corporations, and limited liability companies, securities regulations, bankruptcy, property laws, and accountant/auditor liability. Recent developments in law and relevant cases are discussed.
BUSINESS LAW FOR ACCOUNTANTS(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINES. Sarnikar
MGMT 0642-501(41648)
MGMT 642 Managing Professionals in Client Service Organizations (3)
This course develops the skills necessary for employee success in a client service organization. Topics covered include human resource management, personnel training and development, performance evaluations, managing an audit team, meeting client expectations, and client relations. An emphasis will be placed on maintaining a successful auditor-client relationship while meeting the auditor’s professional responsibilities to the public.
MANAG. PROF. CLIENT SERV. ORG.(3.0 )01/22-05/14Tue,6:30-9:15PMWILSN-402J. Rogers
MGMT 0642 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
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Business Management/Economics
Undergraduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
ACCT 0105-501(40916)
ACCT 0105 Principles of Accounting II (3)
Continuation of the emphasis in Principles of Accounting I upon corporate financial reporting to external parties. An introduction to the concepts underlying the preparation of accounting information which is useful to management in the planning and control of business operations.
PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINER. Alzubaidi
ACCT 0311-501(40918)
ACCT 0311 Auditing (3)
Covers the principles of auditing, using accounting principles as criteria. Current auditing theories, standards, procedures, and techniques are studied. Auditing procedures and analysis of supporting documentation materials are emphasized to ascertain how they lead to the development of an audit opinion. The course studies the legal, ethical, and technical environment in which the auditor works. A practice case study is required.
AUDITING(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINET. Kurty
ACCT 0316-501(40917)
ACCT 0316 Financial Reporting II (3)
Continues the advanced study of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) guiding the preparation of corporate financial statements. The topics addressed include: property, plant and equipment; depreciation; intangibles; liabilities; investments; stockholders' equity; and earnings per share.
FINANCIAL REPORTING II(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINER. Goulet
ECON 0101-501(40919)
ECON 0101 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
An introduction to economic analysis with emphasis on the application of economic principles to an understanding of contemporary problems. Topics to be discussed include: the nature of a market economy, national income, employment and fiscal policy, characteristics of the American monetary and banking system, economic growth and international trade. ECON 0101 and ECON 0102 may be taken in any order.
PRIN OF MACROECONOMICS(3.0 )SOCU01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEH. Sackett
FINC 0318-501(40920)
FINC 0318 Advanced Managerial Finance (3)
This course reinforces and extends the concepts introduced in FINC 0207 - Financial Management. Topics include asset valuation, the time value of money, and a variety of issues facing corporate financial managers, such as the cost of capital, capital budgeting and risk, capital structure decisions, dividend policy, hedging and risk management, mergers and corporate governance. Casework and computer analyses are used extensively.
ADVANCED FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEL. Nguyen
MGMT 0220-501(40921)
MGMT 0220 Production/Operations Management (3)
A state of the art strategic systems approach to the operations functions of manufacturing and service organizations. The course covers designing, acquiring, operating, and maintaining facilities and processes; managing the supply chain; controlling and maintaining inventories; and staffing and scheduling human resources needed to provide goods and services.
PROD-OPERATIONS MGMT(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEJ. Bellenoit
MGMT 0241-501(40922)
MGMT 0241 Business Law I (3)
Develops an understanding of the philosophical and logical development of the law and its relationship to business through the use of text and case analysis. Explores, in-depth, substantive contract law, which forms the basis for business transactions, commencing with the initial negotiation and offer through performance of legally binding obligations and the remedies available if obligations are not performed.
BUSINESS LAW(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEP. Ettman
MGMT 0250-501(40923)
MGMT 0250 Quantitative Approaches to Business Decisions (3)
Covers the application of quantitative techniques to business problem-solving and decision making. Subjects include linear programming, probabilities, simulations, PERT, queuing, and game theory. The application of these analytical tools to business decision problems such as: distribution, inventory control, product mix, scheduling, competitive strategy, and forecasting is covered through case analysis. Approximately 1/3 of the course is devoted to case work.
QUANT APPROACH TO BUS DEC(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINED. Bakuli
MGMT 0308-501(40924)
MGMT 0308 Organizational Development and Behavior (3)
Examines the foundations for understanding individual and group behavior and relates these points to the problems faced by managers in organizations. Emphasis is on topics of study relevant to developing managerial effectiveness in interrelationships with other organizational members. Course attempts to develop an understanding of the relationship between individual and organization and to identify management skills that can contribute to effective performance.
ORG DEV AND BEHAVIOR(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEA. Furnelli
MGMT 0314-501(40925)
MGMT 0314 Human Resource Management (3)
Covers the process of manpower planning and utilization in organizations. Personnel forecasting, employment, training and development, placement, motivation, wage and salary administration, employee benefits, and performance evaluation are covered. Special emphasis is given to problems arising between manager and subordinates, the professional in human services, minority groups, the hard-to-employ worker, and the impact of public policy.
HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINET. Waskiewicz
MGMT 0325-501(40926)
MGMT 0325 Business Policy and Strategy (3)
Emphasizes management planning and control techniques in solving business problems and in determining strategy for sales and profit growth. An integrated case study approach will be used. The course will illustrate the many factors that influence complex business decisions. FOR SENIORS ONLY.
BUS STRATEGY AND POLICY(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEC. Daniel
MGMT 0338-501(40927)
MGMT 0338 International Business (3)
Provides an opportunity to bring the tools and information gained in previous courses to the task of solving managerial problems in international and foreign environments. Focuses on an analysis of market opportunities, methods of entry in foreign business areas, and related business problems.
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS(3.0 )PRGDIV01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEB. Knipes
MGMT 0344-501(41257)
MGMT 0344 Project Management (3)
Provides students with an understanding of the concepts, processes, and tools for managing projects on time, on budget, within scope, and with high-quality results. These skills may be applied to all types of projects, including new product development, information systems integration, mergers and acquisitions, and construction development. Covers project management techniques such as PERT, CPM, GANTT, WBS and project management software tools.
PROJECT MANAGEMENT(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINER. Wilson
MGMT 0346-501(41259)
MGMT 0346 Leadership (3)
Comprehensively examines evolving leadership theory and practice, from trait theory to modern theories of the leadership process, power, leadership styles, situational leadership, contingency theory, and team leadership. Further topics include diversity, ethics, globalization, popular approaches to leadership, and women and men as leaders. The primary course objective is to prepare students for leadership roles in organizations. Students will lean through experiential exercises, lectures, readings, focused videos, and team projects.
LEADERSHIP(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEJ. Raschilla
MRKT 0231-501(41258)
MRKT 0231 Marketing Management (3)
A developmental survey into the field of marketing in business, which will study the roles of marketers in business and society as a whole. Concentration shall be placed on defining marketing, the role of a marketing executive, the various systems of marketing, and the economic factors that affect marketing. In order to probe these questions, the course shall examine consumer behavior, purchase decision making, product pricing, policy and planning, channels of distribution in business, and marketing institutions and organizations. Further dimensions of advertising, marketing research, analysis, forecasting, and marketing information flows, controls, and performance shall be explored.
MARKETING MANAGEMENT(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINED. Hughes
MRKT 0306-501(41260)
MRKT 0306 Logistics Management (3)
The process of planning, implementing, and controlling the efficient flow and storage of raw materials, in-process inventory, finished goods, and related information from point of origin to point of consumption for the purpose of conforming to customer requirements. Logistics is a systems approach to business problems and company objectives that can be realized by recognizing the mutual interdependence of the functional areas of the firm.
LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEG. Merlo
MRKT 0309-501(41261)
MRKT 0309 Sales and Sales Management (3)
A course in effective salesmanship and how to set up and control a field sales organization. Course emphasizes the role of personal selling in the marketing mix and covers all basic sales management issues.
SALES AND SALES MANAGEMENT(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEG. Healy
MRKT 0337-501(41262)
MRKT 0337 Consumer Behavior (3)
By gaining a better understanding of the factors that affect consumer behavior, marketers are in a better position to predict how consumers will respond to their marketing strategies. Consumer Behavior draws on the Social Sciences in addition to the quantitative characteristics of the market such as: population patterns, income distribution, living standards, and occupational changes.
CONSUMER BEHAVIOR(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEA. Furnelli
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Communication
Undergraduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
COMM 0101-501(40623)
COMM 0101 Introduction to Mass Communication (3)
Provides students with a comprehensive survey and critical analysis of mass communication. This is accomplished through the study of the history and structure of mass media industries and an examination of social, economic, political, cultural, and global factors that create the context in which media operate.
INTRO TO MASS COMMUNICATION(3.0 )SOCU01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINES. Boniface
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Criminal Justice
Undergraduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
CRJU 0121-501(41267)
CRJU 0121 Theories of Crime (3)
An exploration of prominent theories of crime causation, ranging from biological, psychological, sociological, and cultural explanations. Theories are compared and contrasted and implications are discussed as foundations for criminal justice system policy.
THEORIES OF CRIME(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEB. Cho
CRJU 0121-502(41271)
CRJU 0121 Theories of Crime (3)
An exploration of prominent theories of crime causation, ranging from biological, psychological, sociological, and cultural explanations. Theories are compared and contrasted and implications are discussed as foundations for criminal justice system policy.
THEORIES OF CRIME(3.0 )01/22-05/14Tue,4:00-6:25PMHMC-01A. Perry
CRJU 0202-501(41268)
CRJU 0202 Introduction to Corrections (3)
An in-depth examination of the American Correctional System. Traditional punitive measures will be analyzed in relation to current reintegration alternatives.
INTRO TO CORRECTIONS(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEJ. Jones
CRJU 0202-502(41272)
CRJU 0202 Introduction to Corrections (3)
An in-depth examination of the American Correctional System. Traditional punitive measures will be analyzed in relation to current reintegration alternatives.
INTRO TO CORRECTIONS(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14Wed,4:00-6:25PMWILSN-316A. Dallam-Murphy
CRJU 0231-501(41269)
CRJU 0231 Research Methods in Criminal Justice (3)
An introduction to scientific methodology as related to criminal justice. The course will focus on the development of hypotheses, data collection, data analysis and hypothesis verification. Attention is also given to basic statistical techniques appropriate for criminal justice research.
RESEARCH METHODS IN CRJU(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEK. Tobin
CRJU 0231-502(41273)
CRJU 0231 Research Methods in Criminal Justice (3)
An introduction to scientific methodology as related to criminal justice. The course will focus on the development of hypotheses, data collection, data analysis and hypothesis verification. Attention is also given to basic statistical techniques appropriate for criminal justice research.
RESEARCH METHODS IN CRJU(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14Tue,6:30-9:15PMHMC-01D. Price
CRJU 0316-501(41270)
CRJU 0316 Civil Liabilities of Criminal Justice Professionals (3)
The civil liability for harm inflicted on another. Topics to be considered will include: intentional torts such as assault, battery, and false imprisonment; negligence; torts of strict liability; libel, slander and defamation; liability of owners and occupiers of land; and the liability of state and federal employees for harm caused in their respective professional capacities.
CIVIL LIABILITIES(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEA. Perry
CRJU 0355-501(41317)
CRJU 0355 High Profile Crimes and Trials (3)
A survey of high profile crimes and trials from different periods in history. The importance of the media in creating high profile crimes and trials will be discussed along with the notation of newsworthiness. Particular attention will be given to the effects high profile crimes and trials have on the public and criminal justice system.
HIGH PROFILE CRIMES AND TRIALS(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14Wed,4:30-7:15PMHMC-01C. Kudlac
CRJU 0355 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
Graduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
CRJU 0601-501(40500)
CRJU 601 Juvenile Justice (3)
This course was developed for those in the graduate program who desire an important competency in the field of juvenile justice. Designed for criminal justice, psychology, and social work professionals who desire to work with juveniles or have had encounters with a system and its clients already in the course of their present employment. Knowledge and competency in the adult system of criminal justice does not adequately prepare on to successfully interact with juvenile clients or the various colleagues that accompany this involvement. A review of pertinent research suggests that understanding juvenile delinquency against the backdrop of sociological diversity is vital to understanding what will be needed for these clients to succeed in school and in their communities. completion of this course will equip students with an understanding of the primary theories guiding the processing of juveniles, and an understanding of the management of juveniles in multiple settings giving rise to a broader understanding of the paradigm of 'treatment'.
JUVENILE JUSTICE(3.0 )01/22-05/14Wed,4:00-6:00PMWILSN-211Staff
CRJU 0601- FOR PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
CRJU 0608-501(41584)
CRJU 608 Methods of Offender Rehabilitation (3)
An examination of a variety of techniques for altering behavior that have been, or might be, applied in criminal corrections. Examples include psychoanalysis, behavior modification, relaxation techniques, reality therapy, work release, vocational training, etc. Techniques of implementing, administering, and evaluating these programs will be considered.
METH OF OFFENDER REHAB(3.0 )01/22-05/14Wed,4:15-6:40PMHMC-04T. Roscoe
CRJU 0613-501(41312)
CRJU 613 Statistics (3)
Basic statistical principles and techniques and their applications in criminal justice. Brief review of descriptive statistics, sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, t-tests, chi-square, analysis of variance, and correlational techniques. Analysis of statistics appropriate for various forms of the general linear model to include multiple regression and path analysis.
STATISTICS(3.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,6:30-9:15PMHMC-PCB. Cho
CRJU 0613- Hybrid Course- Meets in-person every other Monday (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
CRJU 0624-501(41313)
CRJU 624 Administrative Theory of Criminal Justice (3)
An examination of the management of organizations with a focus on theories of management, the individual in the organization (motivation, change, stress), groups (norms, influence, conflict), and the interaction of individuals and the organization (power, communication, leadership).
ADMINISTRATIVE THEORY(3.0 )01/22-05/14Tue,4:00-6:45PMHMC-02B. Rizzo
CRJU 0640-501(41315)
CRJU 640 Homeland Security: Organization and Administration (3)
This graduate course will introduce students to the various aspects of homeland security. It will examine the evolution of Homeland Security as a concept, a legal framework, a redirection of national policies and priorities and also the actual implementation and creation of the Department of Homeland Security. The course provides an overview of the history of terrorist threats and U.S. responses and an introduction to the fundamental policy legislation and documents, such as national security strategies, homeland security directives, the National Response Plan (NRP), and National Incident Management System (NIMS).
HOMELAND SECURITY:ORG. AND ADMIN(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEG. Michael
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Education
Undergraduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
EDUC 0221-501(41524)
EDUC 0221 Introduction to Students with Exceptional Learning Needs (3)
This course will focus on students who meet the criteria for categories of disabilities that are identified by education law, as well as students with other exceptional learning needs.  An exploration of case studies of individuals in the context of schools will facilitate an understanding of laws, history, litigation, individualized education programs, Response to Intervention (RTI), and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principles.  Course participants will explore strategies for developing differentiated learning experiences that address learner variability while maintaining high expectations for all students.  Race, ethnicity, gender, and economic status are examined as they apply to students with exceptional learning needs.  Historical and current approaches to the education and inclusion of students will exceptional learning needs will be considered, including topics of identification, referral, evaluation, placement, and the use of assistive technologies.  A 15-hour field experience is required.
INTRO STDNT EXCEPT LEARN NEEDS(3.0 )01/22-05/14Wed,4:30-6:55PMBATES-212D. Cruse
EDUC 0301-501(41528)
EDUC 0301 Methods of Teaching Mathematics, Elementary 1-6 (2)
This course is designed to prepare pre-service teachers to teach mathematics effectively to diverse learners at different levels of readiness in elementary classrooms grades 1-6.  the course will develop teacher candidates' ability to facilitate elementary students' understanding and application of mathematical concepts in engaging and meaningful ways.  Throughout the course candidates will read and discuss case studies written by practicing elementary teachers and analyze video of authentic elementary school mathematics instruction.  Emphasis will be placed on National Council of Teachers of mathematics supported pedagogy and assessment and on the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Mathematics grades 1-6.  Course participates will design a lesson plans that includes measurable learning outcomes and best instructional practices in mathematics for elementary students.
MTHDS TEACH MATH: ELEM(2.0 )PR01/22-05/14Wed,4:25-6:55PMPAR-202K. Schweitzer
EDUC 0302-501(41526)
EDUC 0302 Methods of Teaching Mathematics, Early Childhood PreK-2 (2)
This course is designed to prepare pre-service teachers to teach mathematics effectively to diverse learners at different levels of readiness in elementary classrooms grades PreK-2.  The course will develop teacher candidates' ability to facilitate early childhood students' understanding and application of mathematical concepts in engaging and meaningful ways.  Throughout the course candidates will read and discuss case studies written by practicing early childhood teachers and analyze video of authentic elementary school mathematics instruction.  Emphasis will be placed on National Council of Teachers of Mathematics supported pedagogy and assessment and on the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Mathematics grades Prek-2.  Participants will design a lesson plan that includes measurable outcomes.
MTHDS TEACH MATH: ECED(2.0 )PR01/22-05/14Thu,4:25-6:55PMPAR-202K. Rice
EDUC 0305-501(41530)
EDUC 0305 Literature and the Language Arts (3)
Provides the prospective teacher with an introduction to literature and language arts programs. Emphasis is on the communication skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and visually representing. The relationship of children’s literature in the total language arts program in early childhood and elementary education is presented.
LITERATURE AND LANGUAGE ARTS(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14Thu,4:30-6:55PMWILSN-316Staff
EDUC 0306-501(41532)
EDUC 0306 Elementary Curriculum and Instruction (3)
This course offers a foundation in elementary curriculum design, development, and implementation.  course participants will investigate how educators design and teach units that are anchored in rich content and authentic learning and assessment experiences.  culturally responsive curricula and teaching practices that meet the needs of all learners are explored and implemented through readings, discussions and guided activities in unit and lesson development.  Differentiation and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) are practices applied to a backwards design approach to curriculum development.  course participants create well-structured lessons with measurable outcomes anchored in the big ideas of academic disciplines.  they explore a range of informal and formal assessment methods and teaching approaches as they work in the field to create inclusive learning environments that value diversity, empower students as learners, support the success of all students, and embrace family and community collaboration.  Throughout the course, participants engage in critical reflection relative to their work in both the course and the elementary classroom.  They develop the capacity to use observation anecdotal notes, and feedback from the course instructor and supervising practitioner to improve their developing practice and sense of professionalism.  A 30-hour field experience in an elementary setting is required.
ELEM CURR AND INSTRUC(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14Tue,6:55-9:40PMPAR-205M. Curro
EDUC 0308-501(41533)
EDUC 0308 Early Childhood Curriculum (3)
This course offers a foundation in early childhood curriculum design, development, and implementation.  Course participants will examine how early childhood educators design and teach standards-based units of study that are anchored in rich content and authentic learning and assessment experiences.  Culturally responsive curricula and teaching practices that convey high expectations and meet the needs of all learners are explored through readings, discussions, and guided activities.  Differentiation and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) practices are applied to a backward design approach to curriculum development.  As part of the course, students apply course knowledge, skills, and understandings in an early childhood field placement.  Course participants create well-structured lessons with measurable outcomes and explore a range of informal and formal assessment methods and teaching approaches.  In their field placement, students practice skills for effective and respectful partnerships with families, and work to create safe and inclusive learning environments that value diversity, empower students as learners, encourage positive behavior, and embrace collaboration with school colleagues and the community.  Throughout the course, students engage in critical reflection relative to their work in both the course and the early childhood classroom.  Students develop the capacity to use observation, anecdotal notes, and feedback from course instructor and supervising practitioner to improve their developing practice and sense of professionalism.  A 30-hour field experience in an approved Prek-2 setting is required.
EARLY CHILD CURRICULUM(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14Tue,6:55-9:40PMPAR-205M. Curro
EDUC 0309-501(41564)
EDUC 0309 Children’s Literature (SAMPLE)
(3) This course is designed to provide teachers with a background of the major objectives and purposes for children’s literature in today’s classroom. Major emphasis will be given to a review of various types of children’s literature, ways to share literature effectively with children, the use of media to encourage more reading, and to the establishment of library centers within the classroom setting. Areas of specialization such as award winning books, key illustrators, poetry, and traditional literature also will be included.
CHILDRENS LITERATURE(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEK. Itterly
EDUC 0311-501(41536)
EDUC 0311 Social Studies in the Elementary School (3)
Requires students to examine actively the basic principles underlying Social Studies. It requires that students become aware of unifying concepts and generalizations related to the realities of how people live and interact. Examination of traditional and current Social Studies projects is a matter of concern. Concurrently, production of materials and use of procedures promoting apt combinations of cognitive affective and psychomotor behaviors are expected.
SOC STUDIES IN ELEM SCHOOL(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14Wed,4:00-6:30PMPAR-204S. Gleason
EDUC 0314-504(41538)
EDUC 0314 Classroom Management (3)
Students will learn strategies for organizing and managing a classroom in order to create an environment that is conducive to learning and is both respectful and inclusive of all community members.  The beliefs of teachers and the effects of those beliefs on students are examined and challenged.  Roles and responsibilities of the classroom teacher to empower all students are introduced and practiced.  Emphasis is on democratic practices, teacher language, proactive planning, and the philosophy behind the management of the classroom.  Reactive practices taught have a positive (non-punitive) problem-solving orientation.  Equity, community, care, respect, and inclusion are consistent themes.
CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14Tue,4:25-6:55PMPAR-204M. Henley
EDUC 0354-501(41565)
EDUC 0354 Educational Planning and Evaluation: Middle and Secondary Schools (3)
This course introduces students to the work of teachers at the middle and high school levels.  Students are provided theoretical grounding and practical experiences in curriculum planning, instructional strategies, classroom assessment, classroom management, and professionalism.  This course also prepares students for reflective, collaborative, and culturally responsive pedagogical practices.  A 30-hour pre-practicum that involves teaching, classroom observation, and completing a Field Experience Manual is a requirement of the course.
EDUC PLAN AND EVAL:MIDDLE/SECOND(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14Thu,4:30-6:55PMPAR-205Staff
EDUC 0358-501(41632)
EDUC 0358 Teaching Methods for Vocational Technical Education – Educating and Assessing the Vocational Technical Education Learner (3)
This course is designed to prepare vocational technical teachers with the knowledge and tools to instruct and assess the technical, academic, and employability skills of vocational technical education students. Students in this course will be able to identify, develop, and model appropriate learning activities and assessments for the vastly divergent student population in vocational-technical education.
TEACH METH/VOC ED-ASSESS LRNER(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEA. Sabonis
EDUC 0363-501(41540)
EDUC 0363 Sheltered English Immersion (3)
This course will provide pre-service teachers with the knowledge, skills and dispositions essential to effectively shelter their content instruction to ensure that the prospective English language learners (ELLs) in their classrooms will successfully access curriculum and achieve academic success.  This course will also help future teachers understand the social and cultural issues that contribute to the schooling of ELLS, expand their knowledge of how language functions within academic content teaching and learning, and how children and adolescents acquire a second language.  This course will provide candidates with research-based protocols, methods and strategies to integrate subject area content with language and literacy development.  The course will take into account the MA English Language Development (ELD) World Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) standards in order to support ELL students' success with all Massachusetts curriculum standards for PreK-12 learners.
SHELTERED ENGLISH IMMERSION(3.0 )01/22-05/14Tue,3:45-5:00PMPAR-F. Ortiz
EDUC 0370-501(41562)
EDUC 0370 Language and Communication Development and Intervention (3)
This course will examine language and communication with an emphasis on continuity and variation in development.  Students will be introduced to the developmental process of acquiring oral and written language and communication skills.  In addition students will examine the impact of exceptional learning needs and cultural and linguistic diversity on language and communication development and use.  Students will explore strategies for assessing and supporting language and communication skills, including the use of augmentative and alternative communication approaches and other assistive technologies.  Students will consider language and communication teaching from a Universal Design for Learning perspective and will be exposed to culturally responsive interventions that support oral and written language proficiency and communicative competence.
LANG/COMM DEV AND INTERVENTION(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14Wed,5:00-7:25PMBATES-223F. St. Peter-Sanft
EDUC 0371-501(41541)
EDUC 0371 Special Education Curriculum (3)
This course offers a foundation in special education curriculum design, development, and implementation.  Course participants will investigate how special educators design and teach units reflecting high expectations that are anchored in rich content and authentic learning and assessment experiences.  Culturally responsive curricula and teaching practices that meet the needs of all learners are explored and implemented through readings, discussions and guided activities in unit lesson development.  Differentiation and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) are practices applied to a backwards design approach to curriculum development.  The dual mandate of inclusion and meeting individual needs requires that special educators must develop a wide array of subject matter knowledge, develop skills in instructional approaches which support differentiation, use a variety of assessment tools, and analyze the results to continue in the design of effective and rigorous standards-based units of instruction.  As part of the course, students develop a unit and apply course knowledge, skills and understandings.  In their field placements students construct and implement lessons informed by assessments.  Throughout the course, students engage in critical reflection upon all curricular components including cultural, linguistic and community responsiveness, the maintenance of a safe and well-managed classroom, and the development of a collaborative learning environment for students, families, and team members.  A 30-hour field experience in an approved special education setting for students with moderate disabilities is required.
SPECIAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14Thu,4:30-7:00PMPAR-109L. Risler
EDUC 0377-501(41543)
EDUC 0377 Learning Disabilities and Instructional Strategies (3)
This course introduces teacher candidates to the history and current practices in the diagnosis and remediation of learning difficulties, including the identification of specific learning disabilities and major theories of etiology.  The discrepancy model and Response to Intervention (RTI) approach to the identification of students with learning disabilities will be examined.  A variety of informal and formal methods of assessment and instructional strategies will also be explored.  Participants will be introduced to the legal requirements, purpose, format and content of and Individualized Education Program (IEP) and how to utilize assessment information in the development of goals and objectives.  The course will take a whole-child approach to the development of learning strategies, in which the impact of learning difficulties and student's social and emotional development will be emphasized along with cultural and contextual considerations.
LRNG DISAB. AND INSTR. STRATEG.(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14Mon,4:30-6:55PMPAR-109B. Conners
EDUC 0378-501(41560)
EDUC 0378 Behavior Support for Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders (3)
This course focuses on the importance of creating and maintaining a safe and collaborative learning environment that values diversity and empowers students with emotional and behavioral challenges to be problem-solvers.  Case studies and materials require candidates to explore a variety of tiered approaches as they learn to assess through observation and the analysis of data to determine skills that are lacking in the social emotional competencies.  Behavior support plans that honor family background and consider the home, the school, and the community are developed.  Philosophies, expectations, and practices of retributive versus restorative justice are examined to determine effects on relationships, the over-representation of males and people of color in this population, and the criminalization of school populations.  The identification process and the use of behavior management principles for students with emotional and behavioral disorders are addressed.
BEHAVIOR SUP STU EMOT/BEH DIS(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14Tue,4:30-6:55PMBATES-225L. Baker
EDUC 0380-501(41545)
EDUC 0380 Critical Multicultural Education (3)
The course provides a foundation in the theory and practice of Multicultural Education.  Students are guided in an examination of the ways in which socially constructed categories of difference shape the perspectives and opportunities of groups in the United States.  These categories include, but are not limited to: race, class, gender, ability status, and sexual orientation.  The course explores the role that education plays in relationships between social groups and institutional power.  Students will be introduced to critical theories and practices such as culturally relevant teaching.
CRITICAL MULTICULTURAL EDUC(3.0 )UDIV01/22-05/14Wed,4:30-6:55PMPAR-204N. Hidalgo
Graduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
EDUC 0502-501(41550)
EDUC 502 Instructional Practices: Materials and Classroom Procedures (Elementary and Early Childhood)
(SAMPLE) (3) This course is designed to present advanced concepts and methods in elementary education. New approaches, innovative materials, and procedures will be presented. Designed for provisionally or fully certified teachers.
INST PRAC:MATANDCLASS PROC EC/EL(3.0 )01/22-05/14Thu,4:30-6:55PMBATES-214M. Kennedy
EDUC 0505-501(41531)
EDUC 505 Literature and Language Arts (3)
Provides the prospective teacher with an introduction to literature/language arts programs. Emphasis is on the communication skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The relationship of children’s literature in the total language arts program in early childhood and elementary education is presented.
LITERATURE AND LANGUAGE ARTS(3.0 )01/22-05/14Thu,4:30-6:55PMWILSN-316Staff
EDUC 0506-501(41534)
EDUC 506 Elementary Curriculum and Instruction (3)
This graduate course offers a foundation in elementary curriculum design, development, and implementation.  Course participants will investigate how educators design and teach units that are anchored in rich content and authentic learning and assessment experiences. Culturally responsive curricula and teaching practices that meet the needs of all learners are explored and implemented through readings, discussions and guided activities in unit and lesson development. Differentiation and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) are practices applied to a backwards design approach to curriculum development. Course participants create well-structured lessons with measurable outcomes anchored in the big ideas of academic disciplines. They explore a range of informal and formal assessment methods and teaching approaches as they work in the field to create inclusive learning environments that value diversity, empower students as learners, support the success of all students, and embrace family and community collaboration. Throughout the course, participants engage in critical reflection relative to their work in both the course and the elementary classroom. They develop the capacity to use observation, anecdotal notes, and feedback from the course instructor and supervising practitioner to improve their developing practice and sense of professionalism. This graduate course is cross-listed with EDUC0306 and is differentiated by assignments, learning outcomes and expectations at an advanced level. A 30-hour field experience in an elementary setting is required.
ELEM CURR AND INSTRUCTION(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14Tue,6:55-9:40PMPAR-205M. Curro
EDUC 0508-501(41535)
EDUC 508 Early Childhood Curriculum (3)
This graduate course offers a foundation in early childhood curriculum design, development, and implementation. Course participants will examine how early childhood educators design and teach standards-based units of study that are anchored in rich content and authentic learning and assessment experiences. Culturally responsive curricula and teaching practices that convey high expectations and meet the needs of all learners are explored through readings, discussions and guided activities. Differentiation and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) practices are applied to a backward design approach to curriculum development. As part of the course, students apply course knowledge, skills, and understandings in an early childhood field placement. Course participants create well structured lessons with measurable outcomes and explore a range of informal and formal assessment methods and teaching approaches. In their field placement, students practice skills for effective and respectful partnerships with families, and work to create safe and inclusive learning environments that value diversity, empower students as learners, encourage positive behavior, and embrace collaboration with school colleagues and the community.   Throughout the course, students engage in critical reflection relative to their work in both the course and the early childhood classroom. Students develop the capacity to use observation, anecdotal notes, and feedback from course instructor and supervising practitioner to improve their developing practice and sense of professionalism.   This graduate course is cross-listed with EDUC 0308 and is differentiated by assignments, learning outcomes and expectations at an advanced level.   T hirty hours of field experience in an approved PreK-2 setting is required.
EARLY CHILDHOOD CURRICULUM(3.0 )01/22-05/14Tue,6:55-9:40PMPAR-205M. Curro
EDUC 0509-501(41566)
EDUC 509 Children's Literature (3)
This course is designed to provide teachers with a background in children's literature and its use intoday's classroom. Emphasis will be given to a review of various types of children's literature, ways to share literature effectively with children, the use of media to encourage more reading, and  the establishment of library centers within the classroom setting. Areas of specialization such as award-winning books, key illustrators, poetry and traditional literature will also be included in this course.
CHILDREN'S LITERATURE(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEK. Itterly
EDUC 0511-501(41537)
EDUC 511 Social Studies in the Elementary School (3)
This course requires students to examine actively the basic principles underlying Social Studies. It requires that students become aware of unifying concepts and generalizations related to the realities of how people live and interact. Examination of traditional and current Social Studies projects is a matter of concern. Concurrently, production of materials and use of procedures promoting apt combinations of cognitive, affective and psychomotor behaviors are expected.
SOCIAL STUDIES IN ELEM SCHOOL(3.0 )01/22-05/14Wed,4:00-6:30PMPAR-204S. Gleason
EDUC 0514-501(41539)
EDUC 514 Classroom Management (3)
This course introduces students to strategies for organizing and managing a classroom that will engage their future students in active learning. Creating an inclusive community in the classroom requires explicit proactive planning. There is an emphasis on democratic practices, empowering teacher language, observing students carefully, building relationships, as well as the philosophy behind the management of the classroom. The course asks students to critically examine their beliefs and change those that limit the opportunities for student voice and empowerment. The course teaches non-punitive practices of positive behavior supports that have a skill-building, problem-solving orientation. Equity, community, care, respect, and inclusion are consistent themes. Pre-requisites EDUC 0519 or EDUC 0544 or by permission.
CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT(3.0 )01/22-05/14Tue,4:25-6:55PMPAR-204M. Henley
EDUC 0515-501(41527)
EDUC 515 Methods of Teaching Mathematics PreK-6 (2)
This graduate course is designed to prepare pre-service teachers to teach mathematics effectively to diverse learners at different levels of readiness in PreK-6 classrooms. The course will develop teacher candidate's ability to facilitate elementary students' understanding and application of mathematical concepts in engaging and meaningful ways. Throughout the course, candidates will read and discuss case studies written by practicing elementary teachers and analyze video of authentic elementary school ,mathematic instruction. emphasis will be placed on National Council of Teachers of Mathematics supported pedagogy and assessment and on the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Mathematics grades PreK-6. Participants will design a lesson plan that includes measurable outcomes. This graduate course is cross listed with EDUC 0301 Methods of Teaching Mathematics, Elementary 1-6 and EDUC 0302 Methods of Teaching Mathematics PreK-6 and is differentiated by assignments, learning outcomes and expectations at an advanced level.
METHODS OF TEACHING MATH PK 6(2.0 )01/22-05/14Wed,4:25-6:55PMPAR-202K. Schweitzer
EDUC 0515-502(41529)
EDUC 515 Methods of Teaching Mathematics PreK-6 (2)
This graduate course is designed to prepare pre-service teachers to teach mathematics effectively to diverse learners at different levels of readiness in PreK-6 classrooms. The course will develop teacher candidate's ability to facilitate elementary students' understanding and application of mathematical concepts in engaging and meaningful ways. Throughout the course, candidates will read and discuss case studies written by practicing elementary teachers and analyze video of authentic elementary school ,mathematic instruction. emphasis will be placed on National Council of Teachers of Mathematics supported pedagogy and assessment and on the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Mathematics grades PreK-6. Participants will design a lesson plan that includes measurable outcomes. This graduate course is cross listed with EDUC 0301 Methods of Teaching Mathematics, Elementary 1-6 and EDUC 0302 Methods of Teaching Mathematics PreK-6 and is differentiated by assignments, learning outcomes and expectations at an advanced level.
METHODS OF TEACHING MATH PK 6(2.0 )01/22-05/14Thu,4:25-6:55PMPAR-202K. Rice
EDUC 0540-501(41525)
EDUC 540 Introduction to Students with Exceptional Learning Needs (3)
This graduate course will focus on students who meet the criteria for categories of disabilities that are identified by education law, as well as students with other exceptional learning needs. An exploration of case studies of individuals in the context of schools will facilitate an understanding of laws, history, litigation, individualized education programs, Response to Intervention (RTI), and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principles. Course participants will explore strategies for developing differentiated learning experiences that address learner variability while maintaining high expectations for all students. Race, ethnicity, gender, and economic status are examined as they apply to students with exceptional learning needs. Historical and current approaches to the education and inclusion of students with exceptional learning needs will be considered, including topics of identification, referral, evaluation, placement, and the use of assistive technologies. This graduate course is cross-listed with EDUC 0221 and is differentiated by assignments, learning outcomes and expectations at an advanced level.  15 hours field experience required.
STU W/EXCEPTIONAL LRNG NDS(3.0 )01/22-05/14Wed,4:30-6:55PMBATES-212D. Cruse
EDUC 0551-501(41631)
EDUC 551 Teaching Methods for Vocational/Technical Education-Instructional Strategies (3)
This course covers theories, techniques of instruction, use of audio visual equipment, preparing lesson plans for class unit, and evaluation of student learning.
TEACH METH/VOC ED INSTR STRAT(3.0 )01/22-05/14Wed,4:00-6:30PMM. Chartier
EDUC 0351-Meets at LPVEC, 174 Brush Hill Ave, W. Springfield
EDUC 0554-501(41567)
EDUC 554 Educational Planning and Evaluation: Middle and Secondary Schools (3)
This graduate course introduces students to the work of teachers at the middle and/or high school levels. Students are provided theoretical grounding and practical experiences in curriculum planning, instructional strategies, classroom management, classroom assessment and professionalism. This course also prepares students for reflective, collaborative, and culturally responsive pedagogical practices. A 30-hour pre-practicum that involves teaching, classroom observation, and completing a Field Experience Manual is a requirement of this course. This graduate course is cross-listed with EDUC 0354 and is differentiated by assignments, learning outcomes and expectations at an advanced level.
ED PLAN AND EVAL:MID AND SEC(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14Thu,4:30-6:55PMPAR-205Staff
EDUC 0558-501(41633)
EDUC 558 Teaching Methods for Vocational/Technical Education Learner (3)
This course is designed to prepare vocational technical teachers with the knowledge and tools to instruct and assess the technical, academic, and employability skills of vocational technical education students. Students in this course will be able to identify, develop, and model appropriate learning activities and assessments for the vastly divergent student population in vocational technical education.
TEACH METH/VOC ED-ASSESS LRNR(3.0 )01/22-05/14A. Sabonis
EDUC 0558 - (Hybrid Plus - 50% + online)
EDUC 0570-501(41563)
EDUC 570 Language and Communication Development and Intervention (3)
This course will examine language and communication with an emphasis on continuity and variation in development. Students will be introduced to the developmental process of acquiring oral and written language and communication skills. In addition students will examine the impact of exceptional learning needs and cultural and linguistic diversity on language and communication development and use. Students will explore strategies for assessing and supporting language and communication skills, including the use of augmentative and alternative communication approaches and other assistive technologies. Students will consider language and communication teaching from a Universal Design for Learning perspective and will be exposed to culturally responsive interventions that support oral and written language proficiency and communicative competence.
LANG/COMM DEV AND INTERVENTION(3.0 )01/22-05/14Wed,5:00-7:25PMBATES-223F. St. Peter-Sanft
EDUC 0571-501(41542)
EDUC 571 Special Education Curriculum (3)
This graduate course offers a foundation in special education curriculum design, development, and implementation.  Course participants will investigate how special educators design and teach units reflecting high expectations that are anchored in rich content and authentic learning and assessment experiences. Culturally responsive curricula and teaching practices that meet the needs of all learners are explored and implemented through readings, discussions and guided activities in unit and lesson development. Differentiation and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) are practices applied to a backwards design approach to curriculum development. The dual mandate of inclusion and meeting individual needs requires that special educators must develop a wide array of subject matter knowledge, develop skills in instructional approaches which support differentiation, use a variety of assessment tools, and analyze the results to continue in the design of effective and rigorous standards-based units of instruction.  As part of the course, students develop a unit and apply course knowledge, skills and understandings. In their field placements students construct and implement lessons informed by assessments.  Throughout the course, students engage in critical reflection upon all curricular components including cultural, linguistic and community responsiveness, the maintenance of a safe and well-managed classroom, and the development of a collaborative learning environment for students, families and team members. This graduate course is cross-listed with EDUC 0371 and is differentiated by assignments, learning outcomes and expectations at an advanced level. Thirty hours of field experience in an approved special education setting for students with moderate disabilities is required.  Pre-requisite: Grade of B or better in EDUC 0319/0519 or EDUC 0354/0554 and EDUC 0221/0540 or permission of the coordinator
SPECIAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14Thu,4:30-7:00PMPAR-109L. Risler
EDUC 0577-501(41544)
EDUC 577 Learning Disabilities and Instructional Strategies (3)
This graduate course introduces teacher candidates to the history and current practices in the diagnosis and remediation of learning difficulties, including the identification of specific learning disabilities and major theories of etiology.  The discrepancy model and Response to Intervention (RTI) approach to the identification of students with learning disabilities will be examined. A variety of informal and formal methods of assessment and instructional strategies will also be explored.   Participants will be introduced to the legal requirements, purpose, format and content of an Individualized Education Program (IEP) and how to utilize assessment information in the development of goals and objectives. The course will take a whole-child approach to the development of learning strategies, in which the impact of learning difficulties on a student's social and emotional development will be emphasized along with cultural and contextual considerations. This graduate course is cross-listed with EDUC 0377 and is differentiated by assignments, learning outcomes and expectations at an advanced level.   Prerequisite: EDUC 0540
LRNG DISABIL./INSTR STRAT.(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14Mon,4:30-6:55PMPAR-109B. Conners
EDUC 0578-501(41561)
EDUC 578 Behavior Support for Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders (3)
This graduate course focuses on the importance of creating and maintaining a safe and collaborative learning environment that values diversity and empowers students with emotional and behavioral challenges to be problem-solvers.  Case studies and materials require candidates to explore a variety of tiered approaches as they learn to assess through observation and the analysis of data to determine skills that are lacking in the social emotional competencies. Behavior support plans that honor family background and consider the home, the school, and the community are developed. Philosophies, expectations, and practices of retributive versus restorative justice are examined to determine effects on relationships, the overrepresentation of males and people of color in this population, and the criminalization of school populations. The identification process and the use of behavior management principles for students with emotional and behavioral disorders are addressed.  This graduate course is cross-listed with EDUC 0378 and is differentiated by assignments, learning outcomes and expectations at an advanced level.Pre-requisites EDUC 0633 or equivalent and EDUC 0540 or equivalent or permission of the instructor.
BEHAVIOR SUP STU EMOT/BEH DIS(3.0 )01/22-05/14Tue,4:30-6:55PMBATES-225L. Baker
EDUC 0580-501(41546)
EDUC 580 Multicultural Education (3)
This graduate course provides a foundation in the theory and practice of Multicultural Education. Students are guided in an examination of the ways in which socially constructed categories of difference shape the perspectives and opportunities of groups in the United States. These categories include but are not limited to, race, class, gender, ability status and sexual orientation. The course explores the role that education plays in the relationships between social groups and institutional power. Students will be introduced to critical theories and practices such as culturally relevant teaching. This graduate course is cross-listed with EDUC 0380 and is differentiated by assignments, learning outcomes and expectations at an advanced level.
CRITICAL MULTICULTURAL EDUC(3.0 )01/22-05/14Wed,4:30-6:55PMPAR-204N. Hidalgo
EDUC 0595-501(41552)
EDUC 595 Professional Development: Special Topics in Education (3)
A graduate special topics course designed to meet the professional development needs of an external educational partner, such as a school or school district. This course may be included in a Westfield State University graduate degree program only if it meets the requirements of that degree, the review and approval of a program advisor based on a final project or portfolio related to the course, and the program advisor's inclusion of the course on an approved program of study.
ST:STAND ALONE SEI(3.0 )01/22-05/14Thu,4:30-6:55PMWILSN-304F. Ortiz
EDUC 0601-501(41547)
EDUC 601 School Oral and Written Literary Practices (3)
This course provides K-12 teachers with knowledge and skills to improve speaking and writing instruction within their classrooms using an integrated language arts approach. At the primary grade level, the course includes theory and best practices for teaching interactive writing and a process approach to writing. At the intermediate, middle and high school levels, the course emphasizes the reading-writing-speaking-listening connection; speaking and writing in response to literature and exposition; writing in the narrative, expository, and poetic styles; and writing and speaking across the curriculum. Emphases also include assessment of writing using holistic writing rubrics at all levels. Students are expected to write in a variety of styles and to critique their own writing.
SCHL ORAL/WRIT. LIT PRACT.(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14Tue,7:00-9:45PMPAR-109B. Godin Conz
EDUC 0623-501(41549)
EDUC 623 Practicum II: Reading Teacher: Literacy Leader and Coach (3)
Practicum II is a semester long commitment designed to meet the needs of the Reading Specialist in his/her role as school literacy leader and coach within the literacy program of a school or school system. Candidates engage in an array of supervised professional tasks intended to move them from the role of teacher to the roles of literacy leader and coach. Additional requirements involve attending and reflecting on local reading council professional meetings and a regional or national literacy conference. A practicum of 100 hours is required.
PRACT II: RDNG TCHR: LIT LDR(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14Thu,4:30-6:55PMBATES-118S. Berkowitz
EDUC 0623- Requires Instructor Permission
EDUC 0631-501(41551)
EDUC 631 Sheltered English Immersion (3)
This graduate course will provide the knowledge, skills and dispositions essential to effectively shelter content instruction to ensure that the English language learners (ELLs) will successfully access curriculum and achieve academic success. This course will also explore the relevant policies and laws as well as the social and cultural issues that contribute to the schooling of ELLs and the diversity of ELL populations. Knowledge of how language functions within academic content teaching and learning, and how children and adolescents acquire a second language will also be addressed. Course participants will plan instructionally diverse lessons based on assessment data within the context of a standards-based curriculum. The course will examine research-based protocols, methods and strategies to integrate subject area content with language and literacy development. Course participants will apply the MA English Language Development (ELD) World Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) standards necessary to support ELL students' success with all Massachusetts curriculum standards for Pre-K-12 learners. This course also requires the completion of a critical inquiry research project further exploring one of the strategies covered. A field experience is required and might be shared with another field experience course. Prerequisites: EDUC 0519, 0554 or the equivalent or experience in teaching.
SHELTERED ENGLISH IMMERSION(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14Thu,4:30-6:55PMWILSN-304F. Ortiz
EDUC 0632-501(41553)
EDUC 632 Research in Education (3)
Stresses the use of appropriate research and evaluation methodology in education. Structured to aid school personnel in the preparation and understanding of educational research. Points of emphasis will include the nature of research, selection and delimitation problems, appraisal of educational literature, necessary statistical concepts as well as participant observer approaches and research design.
RESEARCH IN EDUCATION(3.0 )01/22-05/14Tue,4:30-6:55PMBATES-113S. Leibowitz
EDUC 0633-501(41554)
EDUC 633 Social Cultural Theories: Foundations of Education (3)
A comprehensive survey and critical analysis of the philosophical, sociological, historical and economic foundations of current major views regarding the nature and aims of education, curriculum design and validation, school organization and policy, and teaching-learning. The foundations of current proposals for school reform will be examined in depth. Documented 10 hour field experience is required.
SOC CULTURAL THEOR:FOUND OF ED(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEJ. Nowicki
EDUC 0645-501(41557)
EDUC 645 Practicum I: Clinical Experiences in Reading Elementary (3)
Practicum I is designed to guide initial licensure candidates enrolled in the Reading Specialist Program to diagnose and develop interventions fro PreK-12 pupils experiencing literacy difficulties. Candidates are supervised as the assess (using multiple assessments) and teach two individual case study students considered at-risk for literacy success at two different levels using  a clinical model. They are also required to teach small and large groups of students at different grade and proficiency levels. Practicum I is supervised by both an on-site Massachusetts licensed Reading Specialist (the Supervising Practitioner) and a University Program Supervisor in candidates' schools or in summer school setting. Eligible candidates may choose to enroll in either Practicum I Elementary (EDUC 0645) or Secondary (EDUC 0646). Practicum I requires 150 hours. Candidates are not required to take any time away from full time teaching positions.
PRAC I:CLIN EXP RDING ELEM(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14Thu,4:30-6:55PMBATES-118S. Berkowitz
EDUC 0645- Requires Instructor Permission
EDUC 0652-501(41556)
EDUC 652 Research Issues and Problems in Special Education (3)
Current issues in the field of special education as well as discussion of some of the basic underlying assumptions. Focus is also placed on action research findings relative to professional development, and mentoring of teachers in the clinical experience. Research project is required.
RSRCH ISS AND PROB/SPEC ED(3.0 )01/22-05/14Wed,4:30-6:55PMBATES-118B. Goff
EDUC 0653-50A(41558)
EDUC 653 Multicultural Theory and Practice: English Language Learners (0.5)
English Language Learners are a growing population in public schools and they face unique challenges. Thus, the purpose of the seminar will be to have students (a) observe the ways in which categories of difference such as race and gender shape the experiences and opportunities of English Language Learners in the United States; (b) explore the relationships of linguistically diverse groups to social, economic, and institutional power and the role education plays in these relationships; (c) critically examine their own social positions and the ways in which their cultural assumptions and value systems inform their interactions with P – 12 students and families from racial and linguistic backgrounds different from their own; and (d) develop more equitable perspectives and approaches to teaching and working with and across linguistic differences represented in their classrooms. Students will share their field observations and reflections in the seminar, and the instructor will provide content and facilitate discussions and self-reflections on these observations based on multicultural educational theory and practice. A field experience of 10 hours in a classroom or other educational program that services P – 12 students, such as some community-based programs, after-school or summer-school programs, is required.
MULTICULTURAL ENGL LANG LRNRS( .5 )01/22-03/09ONLINEONLINEStaff
EDUC 0654-50B(41559)
EDUC 654 Multicultural Theory and Practice: Exceptional Learners (0.5)
This course addresses racial disproportionality in Special Education. Thus, the purpose of this field experience and seminar is to provide several opportunities for advanced licensure candidates to explore the relationship between race and exceptionality in their practice. Students will critically examine their own social positions and reflect upon ways in which their cultural assumptions, beliefs, and value systems enhance or hinder their interactions with students and families from racial backgrounds different from their own. Students will share the field observations and reflections in the seminar, and the instructor will provide content and facilitate discussions and self-reflections on these observations based on multicultural educational theory and practice. A field experience of 10 hours in a classroom setting or other educational program that services P – 12 students, such as some community-based programs, after school or summer-school programs, is required.
MULTICULTURAL EXCEPTIONAL LRNR( .5 )03/19-05/14ONLINEONLINEStaff
EDUC 0657-501(41548)
EDUC 657 Applying Linguistics to the Teaching of Literacy (3)
The purpose of this course is to assist students in understanding and applying linguistic principles related to the teaching of word identification and word meaning skills. Data teams led by Reading Specialist candidates examine the specific linguistic strengths and patterns of the English language learners (ELLs) and native speakers to determine appropriate assessments. They then use authentic data to determine appropriate interventions to improve students' understanding and use of English and to support their literacy development. Thirty (30) field hours are required for Reading Specialist candidates. (No field hours are required of students who are not in the Reading Specialist Program).
APPL LING:TCHING RDNG(3.0 )01/22-05/14Tue,4:30-6:55PMPAR-109B. Godin Conz
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English
Undergraduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
ENGL 0103-501(41277)
ENGL 0103 Speech (3)
A course that gives students an opportunity to practice the fundamental principles of oral communication. It includes experience in organizing and delivering various kinds of talks, participating in group and panel discussions, and evaluating speech habits. Voice quality, articulation, and pronunciation are studied.
SPEECH(3.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,6:30-9:15PMBATES-214W. Lucey
ENGL 0210-501(41278)
ENGL 0210 British Literature to 1603 (3)
Exploration of British classics prior to the seventeenth century, including Beowulf, Chaucer, and Shakespeare, in their social and historical contexts. This course emphasizes identifying the connections between literature, history, philosophy, and the arts. Literary and intellectual currents of Medieval feudalism and Renaissance humanism are examined closely. Essential for the serious student of literature and required of all English majors.
BRITISH LIT TO 1603(3.0 )PRLPA01/22-05/14Wed,6:30-9:15PMBATES-111A. Kozikowski
ENGL 0216-501(41279)
ENGL 0216 American Literature to 1865 (3)
This survey course introduces students to writings from the time of exploration to the Civil War. Students explore the diversity of literary expression in the early period, through readings of genres such as travel journals, captivity narratives, Puritan poetry, Native American oral narratives, sermons and slave narratives; students then study the development of the novel and the emergence of distinctive poetic voices in the nineteenth century. The course considers literature in relation to such artistic, historical, and cultural topics as contacts between diverse cultures, social reform movements, transcendentalism, and sentimentalism. Intended for serious students of literature, and required of all English majors.
AMERICAN LIT TO 1865(3.0 )PRLPA01/22-05/14Tue,6:30-9:15PMBATES-111K. Knotts
ENGL 0221-501(41280)
ENGL 0221 World Literature (3)
This course introduces the diverse yet underrepresented cultures and literatures from at least three geographical locations of the world to initiate a dialog around global understanding of history and human experience.  This course will help students recognize literary figures, texts, themes, and movements within the given historical period(s) under study, identify literary genres and devices, and draw the connections between different themes and ideas presented in literature.  Through a critical study of literary texts, either in English or in translation, this course will establish a foundation to promote intellectual growth by strengthening students' abilities to think analytically and creatively about literature and by developing their sensitivity to cultural diversity.  In addition to interpreting and synthesizing representative texts from different literary traditions, students will practice writing reflectively about literary texts and themes by applying the conventions of academic writing to create an essay that is rhetorically cohesive, sufficiently evidenced, and stylistically sound.  Note: This course can be repeated if the themes and texts are different.  Intended for all majors.
WORLD LITERATURE(3.0 )PRGDIV/LPA01/22-05/14Thu,6:30-9:15PMBATES-111M. Sienkiewicz
ENGL 0327-501(41284)
ENGL 0327 Contemporary Cross-Cultural Literature (3)
A comparative study of contemporary Non-Western literature from regions such as Africa, the Middle East, Latin America, and Asia. Works from various genres will be considered in the context of their cultural implications as well as their distinctive literary features. Selections from Western literature may also be included for comparison.
CONTEMP. CROSS-CULTURAL LIT.(3.0 )PRGDIV01/22-05/14Tue,5:00-7:45PMBATES-214C. Bailey
ENGL 0348-501(41581)
ENGL 0348 History of the English Language (3)
The course traces the development of the English language from its beginnings to the present. How did the structure, sounds and meaning of our language change? What forces influenced these changes? The course explores such topics as: the influence of Romans, Vikings, and other groups; the impact of the Norman Conquest and the invention of the printing press; and the work of significant linguists and lexicographers such as Noah Webster.
HIST OF ENG LANGUAGE(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14Thu,5:00-7:45PMBATES-218M. Hudasko
ENGL 0383-501(41282)
ENGL 0383 Teaching Writing: Issues in Rhetoric and Composition (3)
This course examines current theory and practice in the teaching of writing.  Topics covered include rhetorical theory, the relationship of writing to learning, approaches to teaching the writing process, lesson and unit plan development, writing assessment, and shaping instruction to meet the needs of diverse learners.  While the primary focus of the course is writing pedagogy, students also have opportunities to study how various theories of rhetoric and composition inform their own writing process.
ISSUES IN TEACHING WRITING(3.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,3:45-6:25PMBATES-123P. Hermansen
ENGL 0392-501(41281)
ENGL 0392 Business and Technical Writing (3)
How to write more powerfully, persuasively, and successfully in business. Students will learn the strategies of writing clear and effective memos, letters, and reports, and easy techniques for using tables and graphs. By the end of the course the student will have a portfolio of writing samples to demonstrate writing skills.
BUS AND TECH WRITING(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEG. Neikirk
Graduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
ENGL 0527-501(41285)
ENGL 527 Contemporary Cross-Cultural Literature (3)
A comparative study of contemporary Non-western literature from major regions, such as Africa, the Middle East, Latin America, and Asia. Works from various genres will be considered in light of their cultural implications as well as their distinctive literary features. Selections from Western literature may also be included for comparison. Students taking the course will be required to complete a research project that includes a curricular component.
CONTEMP CROSS-CULTURAL LIT(3.0 )01/22-05/14Tue,5:00-7:45PMBATES-214C. Bailey
ENGL 0548-501(41582)
ENGL 548 History of the English Language (3)
A study of the development of English from its Indo-European origins to the present day, including an historical survey of changes in structure, sounds, and meaning.
HIST OF ENGLISH LANG(3.0 )01/22-05/14Thu,5:00-7:45PMBATES-218M. Hudasko
ENGL 0583-501(41283)
ENGL 583 Issues in Rhetoric and Composition (3)
This graduate course examines current theory and practice in the teaching of writing. Topics covered include rhetorical theory, the relationship of writing to learning, approaches to teaching the writing process, lesson and unit plan development, writing assessment, and shaping instruction to meet the needs of diverse learners. While the primary focus of the course is writing pedagogy, students also have opportunities to study how various theories of rhetoric and composition inform their own writing. This graduate course is cross-listed with EGNL 0383 and is differentiated by assignments, learning outcomes and expectations at an advanced level.
TEACHING WRITING(3.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,3:45-6:25PMBATES-123P. Hermansen
ENGL 0609-501(41286)
ENGL 609 Contemporary Issues in English Teaching (3)
This course introduces contemporary trends and issues in English instruction in the middle and secondary school. It focuses on several core issues that branch into current theories, research, and methods of teaching English. This course will emphasize the process of critical inquiry and reflection on classroom experiences.
CONTEMP ISS:RACE IN ENG CLASS(3.0 )01/22-05/14Wed,5:00-7:45PMBATES-218S. Sarigianides
ENGL 0632-501(41287)
ENGL 632 Studies in British Literature (3)
Intensive study of figures, movements or ideas drawn from British Literature. Focus designated each semester by a course subtitle. Course syllabus is dependent upon the topic.
ST: CELTIC FRINGE(3.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,6:30-9:15PMBATES-125H. Stessel
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Ethnic and Gender Studies
Undergraduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
EGST 0203-501(41443)
EGST 0203 Introduction to African American Studies (3)
Provides a comprehensive introduction to the interdisciplinary field of African American Studies. Historical, literary, theoretical and political perspectives within many African American traditions will be explored. The social construction of race, the history and legacies of slavery and Jim Crow and the fight for racial justice and freedom will be central to the course. Texts will include primary sources such as slave narratives, historical and literary sources as well as more contemporary theoretical and artistic works. The course will also investigate the complex experience of multiple kinds of African peoples in the Americas over the past 500 years.
INTRO AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES(3.0 )UDIV01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEE. Judge
EGST 0260-501(41373)
EGST 0260 Introduction to Medical Anthropology (3)
This course is a case-study introduction to medical anthropology as practiced today.  We will study how a variety of non-Western cultures interpret and treat what we in the West think of as universal health concerns such as birth, sickness, death and dying, and mental illness.  We will study how healing and the body can be understood in a variety of cultural ways, in different worldviews, languages and symbol systems that are the context for often very complex health care and prevention models.  Students will learn how a variety of different practitioners and health specialists across the globe such as midwives, 'medicine' people, shaman and religious practitioners and our own medically licensed doctors and nurses symbolize and treat illness to improve health and vitality.
INTRO TO MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY(3.0 )PRGDIV01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEJ. Skogsbergh
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General Science (Physical Science)
Undergraduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
GNSC 0101-501(41521)
GNSC 0101 Physical Science (4)
Includes the basic concepts of physics, chemistry, earth-space science, and the application of scientific methodology to these areas. Topics may include mechanics, heat, sound, light, electricity, magnetism, atomic structure, chemical bonding, plate tectonics, the cycles of the Earth, and astronomy. The relationships of these concepts to societal issues are discussed. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
PHYSICAL SCIENCE LEC/LAB(4.0 )LSCI01/22-05/14Wed,4:30-7:00PMWILSN-314K. McKinstry-Jett
GNSC 0101- Lab on Wednesday 7:15 pm to 9:05 pm in Wilson 311
GNSC 0360-501(41385)
GNSC 0360 Methods of Science Education for Pre-K-6 (2)
This course prepares students to teach PreK-6 science.  An activity-based format is used to create a learning environment that fosters inquiry learning and teaching.  Emphasis is placed on the role and use of hands-on materials, resources, and technology that encourage the development of fundamental concepts outlined in the state science frameworks.  Topics may include: inquiry, engineering design, learning theories, the learning cycle, current state and national standards for science education, lesson plan development, and techniques for assessment.
METHODS OF SCIENCE ED. PREK-6(2.0 )PR01/22-05/14Mon,4:30-7:00PMWILSN-309F. Giuliano
Graduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
GNSC 0560-501(41386)
GNSC 560 Methods of Science Education Pre K-6 (2)
This course prepares students to teach PreK-6 science. An activity-based format will be used to create a learning environment that fosters inquiry learning and teaching. Emphasis is placed on the role and use of hands-on materials, resources, and technology that encourages the development of fundamental concepts outlined in the state science frameworks. Topics may included: inquiry, engineering design, learning theories, the learning cycle, current state and national standards for science education, lesson plan development, and techniques for assessment.
METH. OF SCI. ED. FOR PRE K-6(2.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,4:30-7:00PMWILSN-309F. Giuliano
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Geography-Regional Planning
Undergraduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
GARP 0101-501(40784)
GARP 0101 World Regional Geography (3)
Within a world regional context, the course offers an examination of the patterns and underlying processes comprising both the human and natural realms of geography. Course content deals with the earth, places, people, the natural environment, human-environmental interaction, and the movement of people, goods, and ideas. Special emphasis is given to achieving a degree of literacy in world locations and developing map interpretation skills. The course also introduces various topical specializations in geography such as economic geography, political geography, population geography, physiography, and urban geography.
WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY(3.0 )SOCU01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINET. LeDoux
GARP 0210-501(40786)
GARP 0210 Cultural Geography (3)
An examination of the world’s major geographic realms, focusing on characteristics such as language, religion, population growth, and national development which give identity to these realms and often spawn conflict between realms.
CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY(3.0 )GDIV01/22-05/14Wed,6:15-9:00PMWILSN-202S. Ndegeah
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History
Undergraduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
HIST 0131-50A(41398)
HIST 0131 United States History and Government to 1865 (3)
This course traces the history of the United States from the colonial period to the end of the Civil War, surveying the political, economic, social and cultural aspects. Topics include: Native Americans, Colonial Period, American Revolution, United States New Nation, North versus South, American Slavery, Westward Expansion, and the Civil War. The course focuses on major events, presidential administrations, United States Constitution, structure of state and federal government. Not open to students who have taken HIST 0130.
U.S. HISTORY TO 1865(3.0 )HSGV01/22-03/09ONLINEONLINEC. Cleaton-Ruiz
HIST 0131-A Session- 7 Week Course Meets January 22-March 9
HIST 0215-50B(41401)
HIST 0215 Introduction to the Middle East, Africa and Asia (3)
This course uses primary sources, biography, short novels, and film to engage students in learning and discussion about the Middle East, Africa and Asia. Topics include the historical method, Arab-Islamic civilization, imperialism and colonialism; Africa’s “triple heritage” indigenous customs, Islam, and interaction with the West; women’s movements) and Buddhism. Themes include social, political, and economic organization, religion, gender, resistance movements, globalization and comparative analysis.
INTRO:ASIA, AFRICA AND MID EAST(3.0 )GDIV03/19-05/14ONLINEONLINEA. Banwo
HIST 0215-B Session- 7 Week Course Meets March 19-May 14
HIST 0242-50B(41402)ST: MAGIC AND WITCHCRAFT(3.0 )03/19-05/14ONLINEONLINEM. Abate
HIST 0242 - B Session- 7 Week Course Meets March 19-May 14
HIST 0273-501(41569)
HIST 0273 Labor and Economic History: U.S. and Global Perspectives 1877-Present: (3)
This course highlights major developments in American labor and economic history. Topics include the Industrial Revolution (major unions, strikes, and labor leaders), Progressive era 'trust busting,' causes and consequences of the Great Depression, labor law and worker's rights. 1960s War on Poverty, and changes in the American class structure and domestic economy since 1970. The last third of the course focuses on current global issues affecting the U.S. economy. Topics include the World Bank, IMF, WTO, NAFTA and controversies over globalization, free trade, and workers' rights. Case studies will focus on U.S. - Latin America economic relations.
LABOR AND ECONOMIC HISTORY(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEL. Dodge
HIST 0362-50A(41400)
HIST 0362 Native American History (3)
This course will provide students with an examination and analysis of the history of native Americans in the United States, through the early twentieth century with brief discussion of native history in the modern era. The class will also investigate the origins of human habitation in north America, the significant cultural exchanges that occurred, various tribal histories and the growing interactions between native people and the various new arrivals (Spanish, French, English, etc…) on the continent of North America.
NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY(3.0 )PR01/22-03/09ONLINEONLINEN. Aieta
HIST 0362-A Session- 7 Week Course Meets January 22-March 9
HIST 0395-501(41404)
HIST 0395 Senior Seminar (3)
A seminar that requires intensive guided research on a major topic of historical interest in a particular region of the world, depending on the instructor's area of specialization.  Students are required to complete a capstone research project that is approved by the instructor and complete the History Program Exit Exam.
SENIOR SEMINAR(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEM. Barlow
Graduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
HIST 0610-501(41405)
HIST 610 Readings: America, 1914 to the Present (3)
Through readings, student reports, and discussions based on classic as well as new and important historical works, the historiography of the 20th century will be detailed. The focus will remain on the most significant works by historians and others who have increased our knowledge and understanding of the modern era, from World War I into the 1920's, the Great Depression, World War II, and Cold War, social change, including the cultural revolution of the 1960's, and the return of conservatism in the 1970's and 1980's.
READINGS:AMERICA 1914-PRESENT(3.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,6:00-8:45PMBATES-118E. Morin
HIST 0650-501(41406)TOPICS IN WORLD HISTORY(3.0 )01/22-05/14Wed,4:30-6:55PMBATES-210K. Julian
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Language and Culture Studies
Undergraduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
LLIT 0202-501(41359)
LLIT 0202 Women Writers of the Americas: US (3)
A study of selected works by women writers of the varied linguistic, national and cultural traditions of the Americas. Special attention to the self-definition of writers either in relation or in opposition to existing literary and cultural traditions. Topic of a given semester may focus on writers of a particular region, or on a selected theme or genre. Taught in English. Students may enroll more than once for credit provided topic is different.
WOMEN WRITERS OF AMERICAS:US(3.0 )UDIV/LPA01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEE. Morales-Diaz
LLIT 0232-501(41360)PUERTO RICAN LITERATURES(3.0 )LPA/UDIV01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEE. Morales-Diaz
LSPA 0101-501(41463)
LSPA 0101 Spanish I (3)
The first course in Spanish for those who have never studied the language before. Through an introduction to both sounds and basic grammatical structures, it will provide the student with a foundation in both spoken and written Spanish. In this course the emphasis will be on oral comprehension and speaking, and acquisition of a limited, basic vocabulary.
SPANISH I(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEM. Guzman
Graduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
LSPA 0509-501(41464)
LSPA 509 Methods and Techniques in Translation (3)
Examines the mechanics of written translation with an emphasis on texts or fragments of texts that expose specific problems, including common problematic expressions encountered in Spanish to English translation and vice-versa. Particular emphasis will be given to elements such as the impersonal voice, structure of sentences, verbal tenses, prepositions and punctuation. Students gain practice in translating both from the target language into their native language and the reverse.   
METHOD OF TEACHING TRANSLATION(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEM. Guzman
LSPA 0517-501(41361)
LSPA 517 Intensive Spanish Composition (3)
Review of and continued practice with the more complex aspects of Spanish grammar, and the development of effective writing skills at the advanced/superior levels.  Students will examine models of both informal and formal writing, and will engage both in writing appropriate for the professions and in creative writing.   
INTENSIVE SPANISH COMP(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEStaff
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Mathematics
Undergraduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
MATH 0108-501(41374)
MATH 0108 Elementary Statistics (3)
An introduction to basic concepts and techniques of statistics for students needing skills for research techniques in education, business, and the physical, life, and social sciences, or simply to understand the mass of statistical information in modern life. Topics include: graphical techniques such as histograms or box plots; measures of location and spread; scatter plots and correlation; sampling and sampling distributions; estimation and statistical inference (confidence intervals and/or hypothesis testing).
ELEMENTARY STATISTICS(3.0 )TMTH01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINER. Ryczek
MATH 0108-502(41492)
MATH 0108 Elementary Statistics (3)
An introduction to basic concepts and techniques of statistics for students needing skills for research techniques in education, business, and the physical, life, and social sciences, or simply to understand the mass of statistical information in modern life. Topics include: graphical techniques such as histograms or box plots; measures of location and spread; scatter plots and correlation; sampling and sampling distributions; estimation and statistical inference (confidence intervals and/or hypothesis testing).
ELEMENTARY STATISTICS(3.0 )TMTH01/22-05/14Tue/Thu,4:30-5:45PMWILSN-403Staff
MATH 0111-501(41375)
MATH 0111 Mathematical Applications (3)
An introductory course designed to provide the liberal arts major with opportunities to investigate ways in which mathematics is used to solve real world problems in a variety of disciplines. Applications may include such topics as voting schemes, fair division, networks, scheduling, finance, probability and statistics.
MATH APPLICATIONS(3.0 )TMTH01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEC. Gendron
MATH 0311-501(41493)
MATH 0311 Number Theory (3)
Properties of integers including congruence, primes and factorization, continue fractions, quadratic residues, linear diophantine equations and number theoretic functions.
NUMBER THEORY(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14Mon/Wed/Fri,12:35-1:25PMWILSN-405A. Rokicki
MATH 0323-501(41494)
MATH 0323 Complex Analysis (3)
Algebra of complex numbers, analytic functions, Cauchy Riemann conditions, conformal mapping, line integrals, Cauchy integral formula, residue integration, Taylor and Laurent series.
COMPLEX ANALYSIS(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14Tue/Thu,2:15-3:30PMWILSN-418J. Fleron
MATH 0327-501(41589)PILOT: HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS(3.0 )01/22-05/14Mon/Wed/Fri,10:25-11:15AMWILSN-401A. Rokicki
MATH 0340-501(41495)
MATH 0340 Mathematical Statistics I (3)
A calculus-based introduction to probability and statistics. Topics include graphical techniques for data analysis (histograms, stem and leaf displays, box plots), set theory, principles of counting, sample spaces, discrete and continuous probability distributions, probability functions, random variables, moment-generating functions, statistical inference (point estimation, decision-making based on confidence intervals/hypothesis testing).
MATHEMATICAL STAT I(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14Tue/Thu,11:15-12:30PMWILSN-405J. Judge
MATH 0342-501(41496)
MATH 0342 Actuarial Problem Solving (3)
Develops knowledge of the fundamental probability tools for quantitatively assessing risk. The application of these tools to problems encountered in actuarial science is emphasized. A thorough command of probability topics and the supporting calculus is assumed. Additionally, a very basic knowledge of insurance and risk management is helpful. This course is designed to help prepare for actuarial certification and employment. This course may be available every other year by special arrangement with one of the mathematics faculty.
ACTUARIAL PROBLEM SOLVING(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14Tue/Thu,12:45-2:00PMWILSN-J. Johnson
Graduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
MATH 0680-501(41570)
MATH 680 Elementary Mathematics from an Advanced Point of View (3)
Designed for teachers of middle school and secondary school mathematics. Detailed investigation and synthesis of key topics from different areas of mathematics encourage students to integrate the compartmentalized content of their earlier mathematical studies into a richer, more unified structure. Students develop a deeper appreciation of the underlying unity of mathematics and mathematical ideas. The synthesis of these advanced mathematical ideas creates an understanding of more elementary mathematical ideas that are directly related to the middle school and secondary school mathematics curriculum.
ELEM MATH/ADV POINT OF VIEW(3.0 )01/22-05/14D. Gaulin
MATH 0680- Special Arrangement- Requires Instructor Approval
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Movement Science
Undergraduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
MOVP 0100-501(41568)
MOVP 0100 Introduction to Exercise Science (3)
Through observation and experimentation students will examine the cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal and nervous systems of the body and the impact of exercise on their functioning. The effect of changing one’s own personal exercise habits on risk factors for cardiovascular disease, longevity and quality of life will be explored.
INTRO TO EXERCISE SCIENCE(3.0 )ASCI01/22-05/14Tue,6:30-9:00PMWDWRD-234D. Laing
MOVP 0211-501(41266)
MOVP 0211 Emergency Medical Technician (4)
This course is designed to provide the student with the theoretical understandings and practical experiences in dealing with medical emergencies. Topics included are rescue breathing, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, airway obstruction, oxygen therapy, soft tissue and internal injuries, ambulance operations, and emergency extrication. Class meets for two (2) hours of lecture and four (4) hours of laboratory. (Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to sit for the EMT-M certification examination conducted by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health Offices of Emergency Services.) Costs associated with required equipment/materials and certification fees are additional and are the responsibility of the student.
EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN(4.0 )01/22-05/14 Mon/Wed, 6:00-10:00PM WILSN-138M. Tryon
MOVP 0211- Occasional meetings on Saturday from 9 to 5
MOVP 0212-501(41571)
MOVP 0212 Concepts of Nutrition (3)
Includes basic principles of nutrition and the body’s use of nutrients. Emphasis on the effect of diet on selected health problems as well as the relationship between diet and athletic habits using a variety of established guidelines including the use of a computerized diet analysis.
CONCEPTS OF NUTRITION(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEN. Aronstein
MOVP 0303-501(41265)
MOVP 0303 Health Education in the Elementary School (3)
An investigation of current content and practices necessary for implementation of effective, integrated early childhood and elementary school health education programs. This course provides an exploration of child health status and the vital role the elementary teacher plays in enabling children to acquire healthful lifestyle behaviors as they grow and develop.
HEALTH EDUC.IN ELEM SCHOOL(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEStaff
Graduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
MOVP 0630-501(41263)
MOVP 630 Curriculum Development in Physical Education (3)
This course will provide an in-depth examination of curriculum design and planning for K through 12 physical education programs in schools.
CURR DEV IN PHYS EDUC(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEH. Bohler
MOVP 0636-501(41264)
MOVP 636 Liability and Risk Management in Physical Education (3)
Examination of the legal system and the unique legal problems and responsibilities in conducting a physical education program. Identification of potentially liable situations and development of risk management plans.
LIAB AND RISK MGMT/PHYS EDUC(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEP. Mazza
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Music
Undergraduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
MUSC 0101-501(41255)
MUSC 0101 Music Appreciation (3)
The study of masterpieces of music from each era, from the Middle Ages through contemporary times. Emphasis is on directed listening and music is analyzed with reference to style characteristics.
MUSIC APPRECIATION(3.0 )AAPP01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEM. Goldsmith
MUSC 0104-501(41256)
MUSC 0104 World Music (3)
A survey of world music literature focusing on non-Western cultures including: Africa, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Latin and South America; and lesser known music of the Western world including Native American and Canadian peoples.
WORLD MUSIC(3.0 )AAPP/GDIV01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEJ. Schwartz
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Nursing
Undergraduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
NURS 0305-501(41377)
NURS 0305 Nursing Research (3)
Focuses on nursing research and its impact on evidence based nursing practice. Addresses research terminology, defining researchable nursing problems, identifying variables, hypothesis development and testing and sample selection as well as evaluation of findings. A major component of this course will be discussion of the nurse as the consumer of research. Additionally, the utilization of critical thinking skills will be emphasized to analyze research findings. Students also will be encouraged to explore nursing research that addresses clinical problems in their own nursing practice.
NURSING RESEARCH(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14Thu,5:00-9:00PMWILSN-213J. Holden
NURS 0305 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
NURS 0307-501(41378)
NURS 0307 The Business of Nursing Care (3)
The course is a comprehensive approach to nursing care delivery systems.  It provides the student with an understanding of processes in health systems and organizations and of the responsibilities involved in maintaining a well-managed health care organization.  Students will examine historical evolutions of the health care industry, organizational theory, organizational performance, principles of  health care economics, financing, third party reimbursement, and the influence of accreditation, regulatory agencies, information systems, and health care policy on the delivery of nursing care services.
THE BUSINESS OF NURSING(3.0 )01/22-05/14Thu,5:00-9:00PMWILSN-213Staff
NURS 0307 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
NURS 0309-501(41379)
NURS 0309 Community Health Nursing (RN-BSN)
(5) Identifies current nursing concepts and focuses on their application in public health and community settings with individuals, families and at-risk populations. The dynamics of health promotion and prevention as impacted by global, societal and cultural influences will be explored. A variety of community agencies will be utilized. 3 hours of classroom and 6 hours of Simlab/clinical are required.
COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSING(5.0 )01/22-05/14Thu,5:00-9:00PMWILSN-213Staff
NURS 0309 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
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Philosophy
Undergraduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
PHIL 0102-501(41383)
PHIL 0102 Introduction to Ethics (3)
Introduction to philosophy through consideration of classic and contemporary theories of morality and the best life. Topics may include the concepts of freedom, happiness, justice, dignity, virtue, right/wrong, good/bad, alienation, loneliness, obligation, responsibility, rights and duties, as well as the structure of morality. Special attention is given to the fundamentals of critical analysis.
INTRO TO ETHICS(3.0 )LPA01/22-05/14Wed,5:30-8:15PMWILSN-300A. Neikirk
PHIL 0109-501(41384)
PHIL 0109 Introduction to Philosophy of Religion (3)
Introduction to philosophy through analysis of religious beliefs and values. Significant topics include the problem of the existence of god(s), the nature of faith, the nature of god(s) and reality, the question of religious revelation, the reliability of religious experience, as well as the sociological and psychology import of religious belief. Special attention is given to the fundamentals of critical analysis and the interpretation of original texts.
INTRO TO PHIL OF RELIGION(3.0 )LPA01/22-05/14Mon,5:30-8:15PMWILSN-300A. Neikirk
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Political Science
Undergraduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
POLS 0101-501(40488)
POLS 0101 American National Government (SAMPLE)
(3) Fundamental course dealing with the Constitution, Congress, President, Supreme Court, and political party systems of the American national government.
AMERICAN NATL GOVT(3.0 )HSGV01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEY. Jo
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Psychology
Undergraduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
PSYC 0101-501(40626)
PSYC 0101 Introduction to Psychology (3)
Overview of the basic theories and facts of human behavior and mental life. Topics include the scientific method, the physiological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and memory, development, personality, social psychology, and abnormal behavior. Psychological knowledge is related to daily problems and everyday life. This course is a prerequisite to all other psychology courses.
INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY(3.0 )SOCU01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEC. Laliberte
PSYC 0201-501(41318)
PSYC 0201 Theories of Personality (3)
The major theories of personality, including those of Freud, Jung, Sullivan, Allport, and Rogers, and the evidence used to support them. Comparisons and contrasts of these theories are made and implications drawn will be discussed and applied to counseling, psychotherapy, and education.
THEO OF PERSONALITY(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEE. St. Lawrence
PSYC 0206-501(40573)
PSYC 0206 Educational Psychology (3)
This course explores the application of psychological concepts, theories and methodologies related to educational practices, including the nature and sources of individual differences in school readiness, motivation, self-management, decision making, and emotions.  This course also examines theories of child and adolescent development, the fundamentals of learning theory, principles of classroom management, and theory and application of issues in educational measurement.
EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEJ. Szpiler
PSYC 0219-501(40569)
PSYC 0219 Research Methods in Psychology I (3)
This content-based course will provide students with theoretical knowledge about scientific methods of research in psychology, focusing on evaluating the validity of claims using evidence, measurement, the strengths and weaknesses of different research designs, and the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data.  In addition, this course will introduce students to the use of references in scientific writing and American psychological Association (APA) style citations.
RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYC I(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEJ. Becker
PSYC 0308-501(40571)
PSYC 0308 Statistics for Psychologists (3)
The application of statistical methods to current research problems in psychology. The selection of procedures appropriate to problems, performance of the procedures, interpretation of outcomes, data tabulation and reduction, measures of central tendency and variability, correlation and prediction, tests of significance, t-test, chi square and analyses of variance.
STATS FOR PSYCHOLOGISTS(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINET. Kinstle
PSYC 0318-501(40624)
PSYC 0318 Psychology of Interpersonal Relations and Communications (3)
The major focus is on the nature of interpersonal relationships and how communication influences the formation, destruction and improvement of our relationships. We will bring together the thinking of major theorists and research findings in many areas dealing with interpersonal relations and communications.
PSYCH-INTERPERSONAL RELANDCOMM(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEL. Albright
PSYC 0336-501(40628)
PSYC 0336 Psychology of the Family (3)
A presentation of theories of how family interaction and patterns of response influence personality and behavior. An exploration of the characteristics of “healthy” and “unhealthy” families and the types of individuals they produce. A review of family therapy techniques as a means of treating the “identified patient.” Limited to juniors and seniors.
PSYCHOLOGY OF THE FAMILY(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINET. Kiefer
PSYC 0353-501(40627)ST: PSYCHOLOGY OF LAW(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEL. Simpson
PSYC 0356-PC4(40570)
PSYC 0356 Special Topics in Psychology (3)
each offering; students may receive no more than 6 credits for this course number. Offered on an irregular basis. This offering is an in depth study of a limited and/or specialized area within one field of psychology. The exact title will vary according to the specialization of the instructor and the interest of the students.
CE: ADVANCED DEVELOPMENTAL(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEL. Shelley
PSYC 0356 - Open to Juniors or Seniors in Psyc major
PSYC 0359-501(40625)
PSYC 0359 Sensation and Perception (3)
This course deals with how we construct a conception of physical reality from sensory experience, particularly from sight and sound. We will review the main areas of perception from the neurophysiological, psychophysical, and cognitive points of view: the visual system and seeing, the auditory system and hearing, smell, taste, and touch. A series of lectures and demonstrations will introduce the students to interesting perceptual phenomena.
SENSATION AND PERCEPTION(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINET. Daniel
Graduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
PSYC 0523-501(40494)
PSYC 523 Counseling Basics (3)
Designed to help counselors to develop an understanding of the issues involved in helping relationships dealing with persons having educational, vocational, interpersonal and intrapersonal problems. Techniques and abilities to apply basic counseling skills will be stressed. Pre-practicum hours for Licensure are included in the course requirements..
COUNSELING BASICS(3.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,4:00-6:45PMWILSN-211Staff
PSYC 0523 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
PSYC 0523-502(40496)
PSYC 523 Counseling Basics (3)
Designed to help counselors to develop an understanding of the issues involved in helping relationships dealing with persons having educational, vocational, interpersonal and intrapersonal problems. Techniques and abilities to apply basic counseling skills will be stressed. Pre-practicum hours for Licensure are included in the course requirements..
COUNSELING BASICS(3.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,4:00-6:45PMWILSN-317Staff
PSYC 0523 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
PSYC 0524-501(40495)
PSYC 524 Counseling Basics with Supervision (4)
Designed to help counselors to develop an understanding of the issues involved in helping relationships dealing with persons having educational, vocational, interpersonal and intrapersonal problems. Techniques and abilities to apply basic counseling skills will be stressed. Pairs of students will work with assigned individual supervisors. Supervisors will use audiotapes, videotapes, role plays and/or direct observation, and written transcripts to aid students in the development of individual and group counseling skills. Practicum hours for Licensure are included in the course requirements.
COUNSELING BASICS W/SUPERV(4.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,4:00-6:45PMWILSN-211Staff
PSYC 0524 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
PSYC 0524-502(40497)
PSYC 524 Counseling Basics with Supervision (4)
Designed to help counselors to develop an understanding of the issues involved in helping relationships dealing with persons having educational, vocational, interpersonal and intrapersonal problems. Techniques and abilities to apply basic counseling skills will be stressed. Pairs of students will work with assigned individual supervisors. Supervisors will use audiotapes, videotapes, role plays and/or direct observation, and written transcripts to aid students in the development of individual and group counseling skills. Practicum hours for Licensure are included in the course requirements.
COUNSELING BASICS W/SUPERV(4.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,4:00-6:45PMWILSN-317Staff
PSYC 0524 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
PSYC 0554-501(41518)
PSYC 554 Psychology: Special Topics (3)
Current relevant issues in the discipline offered at a graduate level.
ST: VERBAL BEHAVIOR(3.0 )01/22-05/14Tue,6:00-8:45PMWILSN-300L. Andrade
PSYC 0555-501(40490)
PSYC 555 Psychology: Special Topics in School Counseling (3)
Current relevant issues in the discipline offered at a graduate level.
ST: SCHOOL COUNSELING(3.0 )01/22-05/14Thu,5:00-7:45PMWILSN-116AM. Letasz
PSYC 0615-501(40493)
PSYC 615 Psychopathology: Diagnosis and Treatment of Adults (3)
An in-depth look at the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders in adulthood, focusing on differential diagnoses and contemporary treatment strategies. Class exercises, field trips and speakers will be scheduled.
PSYCHOPATHLGY:DIAG/TRTMNT/ADUL(3.0 )01/22-05/14Wed,6:30-9:15PMWILSN-116T. Nolan
PSYC 0630-501(40491)
PSYC 630 Advanced Developmental Psychology (3)
This course will deepen students’ understanding and respect for individuals and families at all points in the life-span. Basic and applied research provides a broad-based knowledge of the theories and issues of applied developmental psychology: its roots and new directions. Students pay particular attention to normative rather than maladaptive developmental outcomes, and diverse developmental processes across cultures. They view biological, psychological, and social development as influenced by cultural, economic, and political factors. Highlighted are issues of immediate social relevance, such as day care, adolescent pregnancy, child abuse, developmental assessment, and care for the elderly.
ADV DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCH(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEL. Shelley
PSYC 0633-501(41511)
PSYC 633 Behavioral Consultation (3)
This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge in the underlying theory and methodology in the practice of effective behavioral consultation within the educational, clinical, and other applied settings. Students will learn about the nature of behavioral consultation, examine issues and methodology central to effective behavioral consultation across a variety of diverse settings, and discuss considerations related to the application of various behavior change systems, including issues related to management and supervision.
BEHAVIORAL CONSULTATION(3.0 )01/22-05/14Wed,6:00-8:45PMWILSN-116AP. Heick
PSYC 0635-501(40489)
PSYC 635 Crisis Intervention in Schools and Communities (3)
Crisis intervention training is essential for those working with children and adolescents in the schools and community. The course combines practice with principles of crisis prevention and intervention. Topics include crisis theory, adolescent suicide, suicide assessment, post-traumatic stress disorder, system-wide and building-based crisis management dealing with death in the classroom, children’s reaction to trauma and child abuse.
CRISIS INTERVEN/COMMUNANDSCHLS(3.0 )01/22-05/14Tue,4:00-6:45PMWILSN-109A. Vengrove
PSYC 0635 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
PSYC 0638-501(40498)
PSYC 638 Forensic Counseling: Treatment (3)
The purpose of this course is to review and discuss research and theory on best practices in forensic counseling and treatment. Students will learn about programming designed for various offender populations, such as sexual offenders, violent offenders, developmentally disabled offenders, and juvenile delinquents. Current issues and methods for treating criminogenic needs related to personality, mental disorders, and cognitions will be discussed. Particular emphasis will be placed on obtaining skills towards evaluating the empirical literature on best practices in forensic counseling.
FORENSIC COUNS: TREATMENT(3.0 )01/22-05/14Tue,6:15-9:30PMWILSN-116Staff
PSYC 0643-501(41505)
PSYC 643 Ethics for Behavior Analysis (3)
This course is for graduate students working towards board certification in Applied Behavior Analysis. Students will be introduced to legal and ethical topics in ABA and complete in depth study of the Behavior Analyst Certification Boeards' Guidelines for responsible Conduct and Professional Disciplinary and Ethical Guidelines. Readings will highlight important perspectives on the ongoing evolution of ethics and social validity in the field. Students will be challenged to consider appropriate decision making in case study scenarios, reflecting on their own personal views of what is good and ethical, the radical behaviorist approach to 'good' and ethical behavior anf the BACB guidelines.
ETHICS(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINES. Boudreau
PSYC 0649-501(41507)
PSYC 649 Behavioral Interventions (3)
This course requires students to integrate and apply their knowledge of basic behavioral concepts and measurement to both the treatment of challenging behavior and the development of adaptive skills. Both antecedent and consequence-based behavioral interventions are presented through text readings, case studies, and applied research articles.
BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTIONS(3.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,6:00-8:45PMWILSN-116H. Kamal
PSYC 0660-501(41506)
PSYC 660 Theoretical Foundations of Behavior Analysis (3)
This course is designed to provide the student with a background in the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of behavior analysis. The student will learn about basic assumptions of Radical Behaviorism and how they inform the current practice of behavior analysis. The course will serve as an additional elective to the Applied Behavior Analysis curriculum and provide students with a critical component of their education
THEOR. FOUND. BEHAV. ANALYSIS(3.0 )01/22-05/14Tue,6:00-8:45PMWILSN-112J. Reyes
PSYC 0672-501(41514)
PSYC 672 Thesis II: Applied Behavior Analysis (3)
Thesis II is intended as a continuation course for students who wish to continue their education beyond the master’s degree. Students complete data collection and the final work proposed in PSYC 0671 Thesis I: Applied Behavior Analysis. The work is to be an original contribution to the field. The work is evaluated by a thesis committee. After the work is complete, it is to be defended before the Graduate Committee in Psychology and peers. The final acceptance of the thesis is based upon the vote of the thesis advisor and the Graduate Committee in Psychology. The student is also required to provide bound copies of the thesis to the Department of Psychology, Westfield State University Library, and the Dean of Graduate and Continuing Education. A minimum of five (5) small group meetings and three (3) individual meetings with the thesis advisor is required.
THESIS II:APPL BEHAV ANALYSIS(3.0 )01/22-05/14J. Reyes
PSYC 0680-501(40492)
PSYC 680 Evidence Based Therapies in Mental Health Counseling (4)
This course will cover the basic processes involved in Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) as well as Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT). Students will explore how cases are conceptualized and sessions are structured as well as the process of identifying and modifying automatic thoughts and beliefs. Students will be exposed to the concept of behavior activation, the use of imagery, and therapeutic homework. Overall, students will learn the core concepts and techniques of CBT as applied to individuals with a variety of behavior problems. In addition, students will learn the core concepts and technique basics of DBT as it has been proven to be effective in treating clients with serious behavior problems and a history of treatment failure. Students will utilize training videos and small group interactions to analyze and apply concepts and techniques of both CBT and  treatment plans and reactions based on case vignettes that demonstrate behavioral therapy. The purpose is to prepare students to be comfortable and competent in planning and implementing CBT and DBT with future clients. Observing and analyzing training videos is a significant component of this class. Classes are designed for students to discuss treatment plans, strategies, and proposed intervention in group supervision format.
EVI. BASED THERAP IN MH COUNS(4.0 )01/22-05/14Thu,6:00-8:45PMWILSN-109K. Tobin
PSYC 0690-501(40499)
PSYC 690 Internship (Mental Health and Forensic Mental Health Counseling)
(3-12) These courses are designed to help the student evaluate and improve skills as a counselor. The major emphasis of these courses will be on the practical and applied, rather than the strictly theoretical, and will include a considerable degree of role playing and presentation of counseling tapes. Students work at a practicum site of their choice in addition to class hours. Students seeking Massachusetts Certification as guidance counselors must see their advisor before registering to get the correct number of course and semester hours. It is recommended that the comprehensive examination be completed before taking the practicum. Offered with variable credit for the convenience of the student and supervisor, these courses may be repeated for credit.
MENTAL HEATH COUNSELING PRAC(6.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,5:30-8:15PMWILSN-112R. Kantrowitz
PSYC 0691-501(40502)
PSYC 691 Practica (Guidance Pre-K-8)
(2-8) This course is are designed to help the student evaluate and improve skills as a counselor. The major emphasis of these courses will be on the practical and applied, rather than the strictly theoretical, and will include a considerable degree of role playing and presentation of counseling tapes. Students work at a practicum site of their choice in addition to class hours. Students seeking Massachusetts Certification as guidance counselors must see their advisor before registering to get the correct number of course and semester hours. Offered with variable credit for the convenience of the student and supervisor, this course may be repeated for credit.
PRACT:GUIDANCE PREK-8(4.0 )01/22-05/14Tue,5:00-7:45PMWILSN-116AM. Letasz
PSYC 0692-501(40568)
PSYC 692 Practica (Guidance 5-12)
(2-8) This course is designed to help the student evaluate and improve skills as a counselor. The major emphasis of these courses will be on the practical and applied, rather than the strictly theoretical, and will include a considerable degree of role playing and presentation of counseling tapes. Students work at a practicum site of their choice in addition to class hours. Students seeking Massachusetts Certification as guidance counselors must see their advisor before registering to get the correct number of course and semester hours. Offered with variable credit for the convenience of the student and supervisor, this course may be repeated for credit.
PRACT:GUIDANCE 5-12(4.0 )01/22-05/14Tue,5:00-7:45PMWILSN-116AM. Letasz
PSYC 0694-501(41512)
PSYC 694 Practicum II: Applied Behavior Analysis (3)
This course is designed to help the student evaluate and improve skills as an applied behavior analyst. Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis is designed to give students an intensive applied experience concurrent with courses in the Master’s Program. Students work at a practicum site selected under advisement with the Program Coordinator. The student will have a primary supervisor and will work with all of the individuals in that setting (e.g., adults in a group home, students in a classroom). A faculty supervisor will be assigned prior to commencing in the practicum. Student receives a grade of pass or fail.
PRACT II:APPL BEHAV ANALYSIS(3.0 )01/22-05/14J. Reyes
PSYC 0696-501(41513)
PSYC 696 Practicum IV: Applied Behavior Analysis (3)
This course is designed to help the student evaluate and improve skills as an applied behavior analyst. Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis is designed to give students an intensive applied experience concurrent with courses in the Master’s Program. Students work at a practicum site selected under advisement with the Program Coordinator. The student will have a primary supervisor and will work with all of the individuals in that setting (e.g., adults in a group home, students in a classroom). A faculty supervisor will be assigned prior to commencing in the practicum. Student receives a grade of pass or fail.
PRACT IV:APPL BEHAV ANALYSIS(3.0 )01/22-05/14J. Reyes
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Public Administration
Graduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
CRJU 0696-501(41396)
CRJU 696 Independent Study for M.P.A (3)
The student engaged in independent study will select and develop topics and readings in the field of criminal justice in cooperation with a professor from the Criminal Justice Department, with the approval of the chairperson and M.P.A. Program Advisor. The independent study must be in accordance with the student’s approved program of study and may be used to prepare for the M.P.A. Capstone project requirement. Course syllabus is dependent upon the topic.
IND STUDY FOR M. P. A.(3.0 )01/22-05/14Staff
CRJU 0696- Approved Independent Study Paperwork Required
GARP 0515-501(41393)
GARP 515 City Planning Theories and Practical Applications (3)
Introduces the principles of city and regional planning, administrative organization, and budget and financing issues in city management. The course covers the formulation and administration of master plans, as well as the political problems and public relations involved in implementing the plans. The student will learn how to collect, analyze and synthesize data for urban revitalization plans, and conservation and preservation plans for rural areas. Map interpretation and graphic display skills are also integral to the course content.
CITY PLANNING THEO/PRAC APPLIC(3.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,6:30-9:15PMWILSN-202D. Neog
MGMT 0539-501(41392)
MGMT 539 Seminar in Non-Profit Management (3)
The course will give students and overview of the no-profit field both from the macro and micro perspectives. From the micro perspective, students will learn about non-profit corporate structures, mission statements, goals and objectives, human resource management, recruitment, training and motivation of staff and volunteers, risk management, and the relationships between the board, staff and volunteers. From the macro perspective, students will gain an understanding of the role of the non-profit in the community, including public relations, market segmentation and needs assessment, and how best to market a program. Guest speakers at each class will include experts form the non-profit community. The final project will involve picking one local non-profit organization and doing a thorough analysis of that organization.
SEM:NON-PROFIT MANAGEMENT(3.0 )01/22-05/14Thu,6:30-9:15PMWILSN-314C. Daniel
MGMT 0539 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
MGMT 0560-501(41391)
MGMT 560 Resource Development for the Non-Profit Sector (3)
An experiential course designed to 1) teach the fundamentals of development and fund raising, and 2) teach the fundamentals of grant writing. The course will include guest lecturers from the non-profit sector who have been successful in fundraising, field work with agencies who are in the process of fund raising, as well as hands-on experience writing a grant. The major final project of this course will be either writing a grant for a local non-profit organization or creating a fund-raising activity and following it though to the end.
RESOURCE DEV:NON-PROF. SECTOR(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINET. Waskiewicz
MGMT 0599-501(41395)
MGMT 599 Independent Study in Non-Profit Management (3)
Designed to meet the needs of individual students. A plan of study including content and method of evaluation will be developed in consultation between the student and supervision graduate faculty member. This plan must be submitted in advance of registration to the student’s advisor for his/her approval and consent. Topics such as advanced theories and practices of non-profit management, and issues relating to specific non-profit organizations will be addressed.
IND STUDY/NON-PROFIT MGMT(3.0 )01/22-05/14Staff
MGMT 0599- Approved Independent Study Paperwork Required
PADM 0622-501(41388)
PADM 622 Information Management (3)
This course examines information management as it relates to the public sector and its constituents. It aims to enhance the public manager’s ability to meet the challenges posed by emerging technologies in the digital age. The course will look first at the context of people who will be entering the workforces who are accustomed to using technology and how to perceive that individual as a contributor to your agency/organization. This course will also explore the public sector’s ability to cope and adapt to the changing needs of technology. We will examine how the public sector uses the Internet and other digital media in order to deliver timely and appropriate information and serve its constituents. Also, we will explore several technology compliance policies in depth and analyze them in order to understand how one would execute the implementation of such in an organizational setting. Also, we study information systems as they apply to the public sector and how those systems relate to technology compliance policies.
INFORMATION MANAGEMENT(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEK. Galanis
PADM 0630-502(41389)
PADM 630 Foundations of Public Administration II: Public Policy Analysis (3)
Fundamental treatment of the policy-making process in the United States with an emphasis on theoretical explanations of why particular policies are proposed, adopted and implemented by federal, state and local governments. Political science theories of the policy process, methodological problems in the study of public policy, and modes of policy and program evaluation are featured.
PUBLIC POLICY ANALYSIS(3.0 )01/22-05/14Wed,6:30-9:15PMPAR-114P. Vickery
PADM 0630 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
PADM 0660-501(41387)
PADM 660 Ethics and Accountability (3)
The focus of this course is on the obligations of the public administrator and on the unique ethical and moral dilemmas posed by public service. These range from the far from uncommon circumstances where there seem to be conflicting, ambiguous claims of good to the frequent need to choose among one’s responsibilities to elected officials, organizational superiors, professional standards, regime values, one’s organization, one’s loved ones and friends, and, not least, individual conscience. These issues will be addressed from a number of philosophical and situational perspectives, including the discussion of various ethical case dilemmas.
ETHICS AND ACCOUNTABILITY(3.0 )01/22-05/14Tue,6:30-9:15PMPAR-114M. Wolf
PADM 0690-501(41397)
PADM 690 Capstone (3)
This course is required for all students in the master of public administration program and designed as a capstone experience for the program. Under the supervision of a member of the graduate faculty and following approval of the public administration graduate committee, students will undertake a final graduate experience that integrates the principles of the program as exemplified by program standards and specialization with appropriate professional experience. The project consists of an experiential component as well as a research/writing component and is tailored to meet the career goals of the individual student. Students will meet periodically in a seminar to share the work in progress with other students and will present their final project in a public forum arranged by the public administration graduate committee.
CAPSTONE(3.0 )01/22-05/14Staff
PADM 0690- Approved Capstone Application Required
PADM 0699-501(41394)
PADM 699 Independent Study in Public Management (3)
This course is designed for graduate student to explore in depth a topic in the field of public management. A plan of study including content and method of evaluation will be developed in consultation between the student and the supervising graduate faculty member. This plan must be submitted in advance of registration to the MPA graduate advisor for his/her approval and consent. The independent study must be in accordance with the student’s approved program of study and may be used to prepare for the MPA Capstone project requirement.
IND STUDY IN PUBLIC MGMT(3.0 )01/22-05/14Staff
PADM 0699- Approved Independent Study Paperwork Required
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Social Work
Undergraduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
SOCW 0103-501(41247)
SOCW 0103 Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare (3)
Pre-professional course designed to introduce the student to the present profession of social work, present social welfare programs, and the history of social work and social welfare.
INTRO TO SOCIAL WORK(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEN. Padykula
Graduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
SOCW 0512-501(41248)
SOCW 512 Research II (3)
This course builds on Research 1, In this course students will develop knowledge and skills to complete quantitative and qualitative research. Students will learn how to apply research to social work practice. Specifically, Students will learn how to design and implement Single Subject Design research, design and implement program evaluation research and learn how to evaluate exiting research for its usefulness to social work practice.
RESEARCH II(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINES. Fakunmoju
SOCW 0512-502(41249)
SOCW 512 Research II (3)
This course builds on Research 1, In this course students will develop knowledge and skills to complete quantitative and qualitative research. Students will learn how to apply research to social work practice. Specifically, Students will learn how to design and implement Single Subject Design research, design and implement program evaluation research and learn how to evaluate exiting research for its usefulness to social work practice.
RESEARCH II(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINES. Fakunmoju
SOCW 0512-503(41250)
SOCW 512 Research II (3)
This course builds on Research 1, In this course students will develop knowledge and skills to complete quantitative and qualitative research. Students will learn how to apply research to social work practice. Specifically, Students will learn how to design and implement Single Subject Design research, design and implement program evaluation research and learn how to evaluate exiting research for its usefulness to social work practice.
RESEARCH II(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINES. Fakunmoju
SOCW 0522-501(41252)
SOCW 522 Human Behavior and the Social Environment (HBSE)
II (3) This is the second course of a two course sequence that will focus on how aspects of the social environment affect human behavior and on individual development across the life cycle. The major goal of the course is to help students understand the complex interactions between people and their environments and the importance of knowledge and theories about human behavior to social work practice.
HUMAN BEHAV. AND SOC. ENVIRON II(3.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,5:15-7:00PMMOD-105M. Mead
SOCW 0522 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
SOCW 0522-502(41253)
SOCW 522 Human Behavior and the Social Environment (HBSE)
II (3) This is the second course of a two course sequence that will focus on how aspects of the social environment affect human behavior and on individual development across the life cycle. The major goal of the course is to help students understand the complex interactions between people and their environments and the importance of knowledge and theories about human behavior to social work practice.
HUMAN BEHAV. AND SOC. ENVIRON II(3.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,7:15-9:00PMMOD-106Staff
SOCW 0522 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
SOCW 0522-503(41254)
SOCW 522 Human Behavior and the Social Environment (HBSE)
II (3) This is the second course of a two course sequence that will focus on how aspects of the social environment affect human behavior and on individual development across the life cycle. The major goal of the course is to help students understand the complex interactions between people and their environments and the importance of knowledge and theories about human behavior to social work practice.
HUMAN BEHAV. AND SOC. ENVIRON II(3.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,7:15-9:00PMMOD-105M. Mead
SOCW 0522 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
SOCW 0531-501(41275)
SOCW 531 Social Welfare Policy Analysis (3)
Social science, historical, and ideological models, theories, and perspectives are used as a foundation to examine and analyze present social policies and social programs at the organizational, state, national, and international levels.
SOCIAL WELFARE POLICY ANALYSIS(3.0 )01/22-05/14Thu,7:15-9:00PMMOD-105M. Farina de Parada
SOCW 0531 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
SOCW 0531-502(41289)
SOCW 531 Social Welfare Policy Analysis (3)
Social science, historical, and ideological models, theories, and perspectives are used as a foundation to examine and analyze present social policies and social programs at the organizational, state, national, and international levels.
SOCIAL WELFARE POLICY ANALYSIS(3.0 )01/22-05/14Thu,7:15-9:00PMSCI-304J. Mildred
SOCW 0531 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
SOCW 0531-503(41290)
SOCW 531 Social Welfare Policy Analysis (3)
Social science, historical, and ideological models, theories, and perspectives are used as a foundation to examine and analyze present social policies and social programs at the organizational, state, national, and international levels.
SOCIAL WELFARE POLICY ANALYSIS(3.0 )01/22-05/14Thu,7:15-9:00PMWILSN-304Y. Bowman
SOCW 0531 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
SOCW 0542-501(41292)
SOCW 542 Generalist Practice II (3)
This is the second of a two-part course that introduces student to the knowledge, values, and skills that form the core of generalist social work practice. In this course, the development of service plans with systems of different sizes is examined in-depth. The course continues with an examination of the application of theory, use of self, use of professional values, and development of skills for interventions with individuals, families, groups, and communities. The course concludes with an exploration of the values, knowledge, and skills needed to evaluation social work with clients systems of various sizes and of termination/transition with the client system.
GENERALIST PRACTICE II(3.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,5:15-7:00PMSCI-304M. Clark
SOCW 0542 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
SOCW 0542-502(41293)
SOCW 542 Generalist Practice II (3)
This is the second of a two-part course that introduces student to the knowledge, values, and skills that form the core of generalist social work practice. In this course, the development of service plans with systems of different sizes is examined in-depth. The course continues with an examination of the application of theory, use of self, use of professional values, and development of skills for interventions with individuals, families, groups, and communities. The course concludes with an exploration of the values, knowledge, and skills needed to evaluation social work with clients systems of various sizes and of termination/transition with the client system.
GENERALIST PRACTICE II(3.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,7:15-9:00PMSCI-304M. Clark
SOCW 0542 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
SOCW 0542-503(41295)
SOCW 542 Generalist Practice II (3)
This is the second of a two-part course that introduces student to the knowledge, values, and skills that form the core of generalist social work practice. In this course, the development of service plans with systems of different sizes is examined in-depth. The course continues with an examination of the application of theory, use of self, use of professional values, and development of skills for interventions with individuals, families, groups, and communities. The course concludes with an exploration of the values, knowledge, and skills needed to evaluation social work with clients systems of various sizes and of termination/transition with the client system.
GENERALIST PRACTICE II(3.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,5:15-7:00PMMOD-106C. Amendola-Couture
SOCW 0542 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
SOCW 0562-501(41320)
SOCW 562 Foundation Practicum II (4)
First year MSW students are required to complete a 400 hour, hands-on social work internship in an approved agency under the supervision of a professional social worker. This internship may be scheduled as a one-semester block placement or a two-semester part-time placement. Included is a seminar that provides further integration of practice experience with the skills, knowledge, and values and ethics of the field.
FOUNDATION PRACTICUM II(4.0 )01/22-05/14Thu,5:15-7:00PMMOD-105T. Haven
SOCW 0562 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
SOCW 0562-502(41321)
SOCW 562 Foundation Practicum II (4)
First year MSW students are required to complete a 400 hour, hands-on social work internship in an approved agency under the supervision of a professional social worker. This internship may be scheduled as a one-semester block placement or a two-semester part-time placement. Included is a seminar that provides further integration of practice experience with the skills, knowledge, and values and ethics of the field.
FOUNDATION PRACTICUM II(4.0 )01/22-05/14Thu,5:15-7:00PMSCI-304J. Mildred
SOCW 0562 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
SOCW 0562-503(41322)
SOCW 562 Foundation Practicum II (4)
First year MSW students are required to complete a 400 hour, hands-on social work internship in an approved agency under the supervision of a professional social worker. This internship may be scheduled as a one-semester block placement or a two-semester part-time placement. Included is a seminar that provides further integration of practice experience with the skills, knowledge, and values and ethics of the field.
FOUNDATION PRACTICUM II(4.0 )01/22-05/14Thu,5:15-7:00PMBATES-210K. Monson
SOCW 0562 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
SOCW 0562-504(41323)
SOCW 562 Foundation Practicum II (4)
First year MSW students are required to complete a 400 hour, hands-on social work internship in an approved agency under the supervision of a professional social worker. This internship may be scheduled as a one-semester block placement or a two-semester part-time placement. Included is a seminar that provides further integration of practice experience with the skills, knowledge, and values and ethics of the field.
FOUNDATION PRACTICUM II(4.0 )01/22-05/14Thu,5:15-7:00PMBATES-123C. Chandler
SOCW 0562 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
SOCW 0622-501(41324)
SOCW 622 Mental Health and Adulthood (3)
This course will provide the student with advanced exposure to several issues in the area of adult psychopathology and diagnostics. It is intended to provide students with the tools necessary to comfortably utilize the DSM system of classification while maintaining a coherent case conceptualization that is not bounded by this system. Course material will be organized by diagnostic categories.
MENTAL HEALTH AND ADULTHOOD(3.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,5:15-7:00PMBATES-126M. Horwitz
SOCW 0622 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
SOCW 0622-502(41325)
SOCW 622 Mental Health and Adulthood (3)
This course will provide the student with advanced exposure to several issues in the area of adult psychopathology and diagnostics. It is intended to provide students with the tools necessary to comfortably utilize the DSM system of classification while maintaining a coherent case conceptualization that is not bounded by this system. Course material will be organized by diagnostic categories.
MENTAL HEALTH AND ADULTHOOD(3.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,7:15-9:00PMBATES-126M. Horwitz
SOCW 0622 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
SOCW 0622-503(41326)
SOCW 622 Mental Health and Adulthood (3)
This course will provide the student with advanced exposure to several issues in the area of adult psychopathology and diagnostics. It is intended to provide students with the tools necessary to comfortably utilize the DSM system of classification while maintaining a coherent case conceptualization that is not bounded by this system. Course material will be organized by diagnostic categories.
MENTAL HEALTH AND ADULTHOOD(3.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,5:15-7:00PMBATES-210K. Hull
SOCW 0622 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
SOCW 0622-504(41327)
SOCW 622 Mental Health and Adulthood (3)
This course will provide the student with advanced exposure to several issues in the area of adult psychopathology and diagnostics. It is intended to provide students with the tools necessary to comfortably utilize the DSM system of classification while maintaining a coherent case conceptualization that is not bounded by this system. Course material will be organized by diagnostic categories.
MENTAL HEALTH AND ADULTHOOD(3.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,7:15-9:00PMBATES-210K. Hull
SOCW 0622 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
SOCW 0631-501(41333)
SOCW 631 Child Welfare Policy (3)
This course examines the history and current status of child welfare policy in the United States. The theories, assumptions, politics, and economics underlying child welfare policies and practices are explored and evaluated in relationship to major theories and empirical knowledge about child development, children’s rights, human needs, and social work values and ethics.
CHILD WELFARE POLICY(3.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,7:15-9:00PMBATES-212J. Propp
SOCW 0631 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
SOCW 0631-502(41334)
SOCW 631 Child Welfare Policy (3)
This course examines the history and current status of child welfare policy in the United States. The theories, assumptions, politics, and economics underlying child welfare policies and practices are explored and evaluated in relationship to major theories and empirical knowledge about child development, children’s rights, human needs, and social work values and ethics.
CHILD WELFARE POLICY(3.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,5:15-7:00PMBATES-212J. Propp
SOCW 0631 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
SOCW 0631-503(41335)
SOCW 631 Child Welfare Policy (3)
This course examines the history and current status of child welfare policy in the United States. The theories, assumptions, politics, and economics underlying child welfare policies and practices are explored and evaluated in relationship to major theories and empirical knowledge about child development, children’s rights, human needs, and social work values and ethics.
CHILD WELFARE POLICY(3.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,7:15-9:00PMBATES-123J. Schrenzel
SOCW 0631 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
SOCW 0631-504(41336)
SOCW 631 Child Welfare Policy (3)
This course examines the history and current status of child welfare policy in the United States. The theories, assumptions, politics, and economics underlying child welfare policies and practices are explored and evaluated in relationship to major theories and empirical knowledge about child development, children’s rights, human needs, and social work values and ethics.
CHILD WELFARE POLICY(3.0 )01/22-05/14Mon,5:15-7:00PMBATES-223Staff
SOCW 0631 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
SOCW 0643-501(41328)
SOCW 643 Advanced Practice with Families (3)
This course focuses on the knowledge, skills, and values needed for advanced social work practice with families. The course includes an in-depth look at clinical social work with families through the process of engagement, assessment, planning, intervention, evaluation, and termination. Further, the course examines multiple theories for clinical social work with families and the integration of current evidence into family practice.
ADV. PRACTICE WITH FAMILIES(3.0 )01/22-05/14Thu,5:15-7:00PMBATES-125K. Walsh
SOCW 0643 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
SOCW 0643-502(41329)
SOCW 643 Advanced Practice with Families (3)
This course focuses on the knowledge, skills, and values needed for advanced social work practice with families. The course includes an in-depth look at clinical social work with families through the process of engagement, assessment, planning, intervention, evaluation, and termination. Further, the course examines multiple theories for clinical social work with families and the integration of current evidence into family practice.
ADV. PRACTICE WITH FAMILIES(3.0 )01/22-05/14Thu,5:15-7:00PMBATES-212M. Michaelian
SOCW 0643 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
SOCW 0643-503(41330)
SOCW 643 Advanced Practice with Families (3)
This course focuses on the knowledge, skills, and values needed for advanced social work practice with families. The course includes an in-depth look at clinical social work with families through the process of engagement, assessment, planning, intervention, evaluation, and termination. Further, the course examines multiple theories for clinical social work with families and the integration of current evidence into family practice.
ADV. PRACTICE WITH FAMILIES(3.0 )01/22-05/14Thu,7:15-9:00PMBATES-118S. Dunn
SOCW 0643 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
SOCW 0643-504(41331)
SOCW 643 Advanced Practice with Families (3)
This course focuses on the knowledge, skills, and values needed for advanced social work practice with families. The course includes an in-depth look at clinical social work with families through the process of engagement, assessment, planning, intervention, evaluation, and termination. Further, the course examines multiple theories for clinical social work with families and the integration of current evidence into family practice.
ADV. PRACTICE WITH FAMILIES(3.0 )01/22-05/14Thu,7:15-9:00PMBATES-125K. Walsh
SOCW 0643 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
SOCW 0652-501(41332)
SOCW 652 Substance Abuse Treatment (3)
This course will provide an overview of the various types of addictive substances, the acute and chronic effects, and the relational impact to human behavior and the social environment. Using a trans-theoretical framework, students will increase their practice knowledge about prevention, assessment, treatment models and techniques, and the importance of aftercare when working with clients who are addicted and/or dually diagnosed.
SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEN. Padykula
SOCW 0661-501(41337)
SOCW 661 Advanced Practicum I (5)
This is the first of a two-part final year MSW practicum experience. Second year MSW students are required to complete a 500 hour, hands-on social work internship in an approved agency under the supervision of a professional social worker. Each semester the student is expected to complete 250 hours of practicum. Included is a weekly seminar that provides further integration of practice with the skills, knowledge, and values and ethics of the field. In this first semester skills around engagement, assessment and service planning will be the focus.
ADVANCED PRACTICUM I(5.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEK. Walsh
SOCW 0661-502(41338)
SOCW 661 Advanced Practicum I (5)
This is the first of a two-part final year MSW practicum experience. Second year MSW students are required to complete a 500 hour, hands-on social work internship in an approved agency under the supervision of a professional social worker. Each semester the student is expected to complete 250 hours of practicum. Included is a weekly seminar that provides further integration of practice with the skills, knowledge, and values and ethics of the field. In this first semester skills around engagement, assessment and service planning will be the focus.
ADVANCED PRACTICUM I(5.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINES. Fakunmoju
SOCW 0661-503(41339)
SOCW 661 Advanced Practicum I (5)
This is the first of a two-part final year MSW practicum experience. Second year MSW students are required to complete a 500 hour, hands-on social work internship in an approved agency under the supervision of a professional social worker. Each semester the student is expected to complete 250 hours of practicum. Included is a weekly seminar that provides further integration of practice with the skills, knowledge, and values and ethics of the field. In this first semester skills around engagement, assessment and service planning will be the focus.
ADVANCED PRACTICUM I(5.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEM. Horwitz
SOCW 0661-504(41340)
SOCW 661 Advanced Practicum I (5)
This is the first of a two-part final year MSW practicum experience. Second year MSW students are required to complete a 500 hour, hands-on social work internship in an approved agency under the supervision of a professional social worker. Each semester the student is expected to complete 250 hours of practicum. Included is a weekly seminar that provides further integration of practice with the skills, knowledge, and values and ethics of the field. In this first semester skills around engagement, assessment and service planning will be the focus.
ADVANCED PRACTICUM I(5.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEM. Farina de Parada
SOCW 0661-505(41341)
SOCW 661 Advanced Practicum I (5)
This is the first of a two-part final year MSW practicum experience. Second year MSW students are required to complete a 500 hour, hands-on social work internship in an approved agency under the supervision of a professional social worker. Each semester the student is expected to complete 250 hours of practicum. Included is a weekly seminar that provides further integration of practice with the skills, knowledge, and values and ethics of the field. In this first semester skills around engagement, assessment and service planning will be the focus.
ADVANCED PRACTICUM I(5.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEM. Horwitz
SOCW 0661-506(41342)
SOCW 661 Advanced Practicum I (5)
This is the first of a two-part final year MSW practicum experience. Second year MSW students are required to complete a 500 hour, hands-on social work internship in an approved agency under the supervision of a professional social worker. Each semester the student is expected to complete 250 hours of practicum. Included is a weekly seminar that provides further integration of practice with the skills, knowledge, and values and ethics of the field. In this first semester skills around engagement, assessment and service planning will be the focus.
ADVANCED PRACTICUM I(5.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEM. Clark
SOCW 0661-507(41343)
SOCW 661 Advanced Practicum I (5)
This is the first of a two-part final year MSW practicum experience. Second year MSW students are required to complete a 500 hour, hands-on social work internship in an approved agency under the supervision of a professional social worker. Each semester the student is expected to complete 250 hours of practicum. Included is a weekly seminar that provides further integration of practice with the skills, knowledge, and values and ethics of the field. In this first semester skills around engagement, assessment and service planning will be the focus.
ADVANCED PRACTICUM I(5.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINET. Haven
SOCW 0699-501(41344)
SOCW 699 Special Topics In Social Work (3)
This course is designed as an in depth treatment of a limited and/or specialized area within social work. This course may be repeated with a different topic.
ST: INTEGRATED HEALTH CARE(3.0 )01/22-05/14Thu,7:15-9:00PMMOD-106C. Owen
SOCW 0699 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
SOCW 0699-502(41345)
SOCW 699 Special Topics In Social Work (3)
This course is designed as an in depth treatment of a limited and/or specialized area within social work. This course may be repeated with a different topic.
ST: ADMIN AND SUPERVISION(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEM. McCartney
SOCW 0699-503(41346)
SOCW 699 Special Topics In Social Work (3)
This course is designed as an in depth treatment of a limited and/or specialized area within social work. This course may be repeated with a different topic.
ST: INTERSUBJECTIVITY(3.0 )01/22-05/14Thu,5:15-7:00PMBATES-126M. Farina de Parada
SOCW 0699 - (Hybrid - 50% + in-person)
SOCW 0699-504(41347)
SOCW 699 Special Topics In Social Work (3)
This course is designed as an in depth treatment of a limited and/or specialized area within social work. This course may be repeated with a different topic.
ST: CRISIS TREATMENT AND SUICIDE(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEM. Clark
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Sociology
Undergraduate Courses
CourseTitle Pre-req Core Start/End Dates DaysRoomInstructor
SOCI 0201-501(41439)
SOCI 0201 The Family (3)
The family as a social institution, affected by and affecting other institutions. Some material of the family in non-industrial societies will be included, but the main focus will be on persisting patterns and on changes in pre-marital, marital, and family relationships in the United States.
THE FAMILY(3.0 )01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINET. Smith
SOCI 0202-501(41438)
SOCI 0202 Race and Ethnic Relations (3)
A study of the phenomena which arise when different biological and cultural groups interact, and of theories and methods calculated to reduce antipathy and discrimination against minority groups, with an emphasis on American relations.
RACE AND ETHNIC RELAT(3.0 )PRUDIV01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEG. Aquino
SOCI 0305-50B(41442)
SOCI 0305 Urban Sociology (3)
Growth, structure and functions of the city. The urban place as an ecological, stratified, attitudinal and decision-making unit. Urban problems and social relations.
URBAN SOCIOLOGY(3.0 )PR03/19-05/14ONLINEONLINEG. Aquino
SOCI 0305- B Session Class Meets March 19 to May 14
SOCI 0307-50A(41441)
SOCI 0307 Social Problems (3)
A study of contemporary American society in light of selected problem areas. An analysis of contributing factors, conflicting views and values, current situation of prospects for resolution involving application of sociological concepts, theories, and methods.
SOCIAL PROBLEMS(3.0 )PR01/22-03/09ONLINEONLINEL. Zayac
SOCI 0307 - A Session Class Meets Jan. 22 to March 9
SOCI 0314-501(41437)
SOCI 0314 Collective Behavior and Social Movements (3)
Study of crowds, panics and riots, fads and fashions, rumor and propaganda, the formation of publics and social movements. Examines the transition from unorganized to organized group behavior whose intent is to enact or impede social change. Such group behaviors are examined through the prism of various sociological perspectives.
COLLECTIVE BEH AND SOCIAL MVMTS(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEN. Mangaliso
SOCI 0317-501(41440)
SOCI 0317 Deviance and Social Control (3)
This course examines various behaviors considered as 'deviant.' Beginning with definitions of deviance, the course analyzes the extent of deviant behaviors, theories and causes of deviant behavior, and the role of social control in defining what constitutes 'deviance.' In the course, a broad range of behaviors are considered, with the aim of providing students with a distinctly sociological frame of reference through which a fuller understanding of such behaviors may be gained. Policy implications are also discussed.
DEVIANCE AND SOCIAL CONTROL(3.0 )PR01/22-05/14ONLINEONLINEL. Zayac
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