Fall 2022 Day Course Offerings

Last updated on Monday, May 16, 2022 03:51 PM

COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
Accounting and Finance
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
ACCT 0104-001 (20350) PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I
ACCT 0104 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I (3)
Development of a framework of concepts underlying the preparation of corporate financial statements which are useful to investors, economists, the general public, and other interested external parties. The balance sheet and income statement as conventionally reported by American corporations are studied as to methodology for their preparation, their interpretation, and their strengths and limitations.
PR Moore, E TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM WILSN 404 3.0
ACCT 0104-002 (20400) PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I
ACCT 0104 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I (3)
Development of a framework of concepts underlying the preparation of corporate financial statements which are useful to investors, economists, the general public, and other interested external parties. The balance sheet and income statement as conventionally reported by American corporations are studied as to methodology for their preparation, their interpretation, and their strengths and limitations.
PR Moore, E TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 404 3.0
ACCT 0104-003 (20404) PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I
ACCT 0104 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I (3)
Development of a framework of concepts underlying the preparation of corporate financial statements which are useful to investors, economists, the general public, and other interested external parties. The balance sheet and income statement as conventionally reported by American corporations are studied as to methodology for their preparation, their interpretation, and their strengths and limitations.
PR Moore, E TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM WILSN 404 3.0
ACCT 0104-004 (20419) PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I
ACCT 0104 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I (3)
Development of a framework of concepts underlying the preparation of corporate financial statements which are useful to investors, economists, the general public, and other interested external parties. The balance sheet and income statement as conventionally reported by American corporations are studied as to methodology for their preparation, their interpretation, and their strengths and limitations.
PR STAFF MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM WILSN 211 3.0
ACCT 0104-005 (21424) PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I
ACCT 0104 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I (3)
Development of a framework of concepts underlying the preparation of corporate financial statements which are useful to investors, economists, the general public, and other interested external parties. The balance sheet and income statement as conventionally reported by American corporations are studied as to methodology for their preparation, their interpretation, and their strengths and limitations.
PR STAFF ONLINE 3.0
ACCT 0105-001 (20351) PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II
ACCT 0105 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II (3)
Continuation of the emphasis in Principles of Accounting I upon corporate financial reporting to external parties. An introduction to the concepts underlying the preparation of accounting information which is useful to management in the planning and control of business operations.
PR Al Zubaidi, R MW 09:20 AM-10:10 AM
F
Hybrid
WILSN 404
ONLINE
3.0
ACCT 0105-002 (20401) PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II
ACCT 0105 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II (3)
Continuation of the emphasis in Principles of Accounting I upon corporate financial reporting to external parties. An introduction to the concepts underlying the preparation of accounting information which is useful to management in the planning and control of business operations.
PR STAFF TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM WILSN 403 3.0
ACCT 0105-003 (20405) PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II
ACCT 0105 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II (3)
Continuation of the emphasis in Principles of Accounting I upon corporate financial reporting to external parties. An introduction to the concepts underlying the preparation of accounting information which is useful to management in the planning and control of business operations.
PR STAFF MW 11:30 AM-12:20 PM
F
Hybrid
WILSN 400
ONLINE
3.0
ACCT 0105-004 (21220) PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II
ACCT 0105 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II (3)
Continuation of the emphasis in Principles of Accounting I upon corporate financial reporting to external parties. An introduction to the concepts underlying the preparation of accounting information which is useful to management in the planning and control of business operations.
PR STAFF ONLINE 3.0
ACCT 0310-001 (20421) FEDERAL INCOME TAXATION
ACCT 0310 FEDERAL INCOME TAXATION (3)
A first course in Federal Taxation which provides an overview of past and present Internal Revenue Codes. Emphasis is on personal and business income tax procedures and preparation. Exclusions, deductions and income from proprietorships, partnerships, rental units, trusts and estates, dividends and interest are included.
PR STAFF ONLINE 3.0
ACCT 0315-001 (21413) FINANCIAL REPORTING I
ACCT 0315 FINANCIAL REPORTING I (3)
Advances the depth of accounting concepts pursued in the accounting principles courses. The course begins with an overall review of basic financial concepts and the essentials of the accounting process. It continues with a more indepth view of income recognition and measurement, accounting changes and errors, and a detailed look at various asset accounts and their relationship to the income statement. Balance sheet accounts covered include cash, receivables, and inventory.
PR STAFF ONLINE 3.0
ACCT 0315-002 (20417) FINANCIAL REPORTING I
ACCT 0315 FINANCIAL REPORTING I (3)
Advances the depth of accounting concepts pursued in the accounting principles courses. The course begins with an overall review of basic financial concepts and the essentials of the accounting process. It continues with a more indepth view of income recognition and measurement, accounting changes and errors, and a detailed look at various asset accounts and their relationship to the income statement. Balance sheet accounts covered include cash, receivables, and inventory.
PR STAFF TR 08:15 AM-09:30 AM WILSN 400 3.0
ACCT 0345-001 (20532) ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS
ACCT 0345 ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)
Study of factors considered in the design, development, and implementation of accounting related information systems. Topics may include computer feasibility studies, business processes and transaction cycles, general ledger and financial reporting, proper system documentation, internal controls and audit trails, implementation issues, the impact of the accounting function on various elements of the organization, and implications of the Internet on accounting information systems.
PR STAFF MW 10:25 AM-11:15 AM
F
Hybrid
WILSN 130
ONLINE
3.0
FINC 0102-001 (21221) PERSONAL FINANCIAL PLANNING
FINC 0102 PERSONAL FINANCIAL PLANNING (3)
A study of the concepts and strategies in personal financial planning. Major topics include planning techniques, forms of income, investment and savings, managing credit, risk management, tax planning, accumulation and transfer of wealth.
Chatt, R F
MW 11:30 AM-12:20 PM
Hybrid
ONLINE
WILSN 420
3.0
FINC 0207-001 (20396) FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
FINC 0207 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3)
Introduces basic concepts of corporate financial management. The course encompasses practical, as well as theoretical, aspects of corporate finance, with an emphasis on the decision making functions of the financial manager and the process of valuation. The objective of the course is to give students specific skills to analyze and interpret financial data and to develop an understanding of the nature of investment and financing decisions in business organizations. Topics covered include; financial statement analysis, the time value of money, the valuation of financial securities such as stocks and bonds, and capital budgeting analysis.
PR Nguyen, L ONLINE 3.0
FINC 0207-002 (20493) FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
FINC 0207 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3)
Introduces basic concepts of corporate financial management. The course encompasses practical, as well as theoretical, aspects of corporate finance, with an emphasis on the decision making functions of the financial manager and the process of valuation. The objective of the course is to give students specific skills to analyze and interpret financial data and to develop an understanding of the nature of investment and financing decisions in business organizations. Topics covered include; financial statement analysis, the time value of money, the valuation of financial securities such as stocks and bonds, and capital budgeting analysis.
PR Chatt, R MW 09:20 AM-10:10 AM
F
Hybrid
WILSN 420
ONLINE
3.0
FINC 0207-003 (20494) FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
FINC 0207 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3)
Introduces basic concepts of corporate financial management. The course encompasses practical, as well as theoretical, aspects of corporate finance, with an emphasis on the decision making functions of the financial manager and the process of valuation. The objective of the course is to give students specific skills to analyze and interpret financial data and to develop an understanding of the nature of investment and financing decisions in business organizations. Topics covered include; financial statement analysis, the time value of money, the valuation of financial securities such as stocks and bonds, and capital budgeting analysis.
PR Chatt, R MW 10:25 AM-11:15 AM
F
Hybrid
WILSN 420
ONLINE
3.0
FINC 0207-004 (20568) FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
FINC 0207 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3)
Introduces basic concepts of corporate financial management. The course encompasses practical, as well as theoretical, aspects of corporate finance, with an emphasis on the decision making functions of the financial manager and the process of valuation. The objective of the course is to give students specific skills to analyze and interpret financial data and to develop an understanding of the nature of investment and financing decisions in business organizations. Topics covered include; financial statement analysis, the time value of money, the valuation of financial securities such as stocks and bonds, and capital budgeting analysis.
PR Nguyen, L TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 420 3.0
FINC 0305-001 (20412) INTRO TO ECONOMETRIC METHODS
FINC 0305 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRIC METHODS (3)
A study of the application of statistical methods and techniques to economic conditions. The primary focus of the course is the formulation, interpretation, and critical analysis of regression methodology. Topics include: hypothesis testing, multiple regression, specification errors, multi-collinearity, and autocorrelation.
PR Chuku, S TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 407 3.0 ARSN
FINC 0312-001 (20442) INVESTMENTS: SECURITY ANALYSYS
FINC 0312 INVESTMENTS: SECURITY ANALYSIS (3)
Introduction to fundamental concepts of investments with an emphasis on the evaluation of financial securities. Topics include the operation of financial markets, how securities are bought and sold, economic and industry analysis, and financial statement analysis. The objective is to familiarize students with basic concepts and discuss issues critical to making sound investment decisions. It is applicable to students seeking to develop personal investing skills, as well as those considering a career in the area of investments.
PR Nguyen, L TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM WILSN 404 3.0
FINC 0326-001 (20783) INSURANCE AND RISK MANAGEMENT
FINC 0326 INSURANCE AND RISK MANAGEMENT (3)
Provides the student with an in-depth understanding of all phases of insurance and risk management. The topics to be studied are basic principles, the nature and operation of insurance business, and the nature of risk and risk management. Included in these topics are property insurance; casualty insurance; life, accident, and health insurance; and group and social insurance.
PR Nguyen, L TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM WILSN 420 3.0
FINC 0350-001 (20759) ST: FINANCIAL MODELING
FINC 0350 SPECIAL TOPICS IN FINANCE (3)
Examines and analyzes contemporary topics in finance and investments. Course content will vary according to the area of specialization of the instructor and the interests of the students. May be repeated if course content differs.
Chatt, R MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM WILSN 420 3.0
Art
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
ART 0103-001 (20462) DRAWING 1
ART 0103 DRAWING I (3)
Drawing I presents the study of structure in form and space through the creation of three-dimensional illusions on two-dimensional surfaces. Line, texture, value and shape are introduced in addition to linear and atmospheric perspective, life drawing, and various media.
Phipps, G MW 02:15 PM-05:00 PM DOWER 267 3.0
ART 0103-002 (20871) DRAWING 1
ART 0103 DRAWING I (3)
Drawing I presents the study of structure in form and space through the creation of three-dimensional illusions on two-dimensional surfaces. Line, texture, value and shape are introduced in addition to linear and atmospheric perspective, life drawing, and various media.
Phipps, G MW 11:15 AM-02:00 PM DOWER 267 3.0
ART 0104-001 (20461) DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS
ART 0104 DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS (3)
This course explores the interaction of universal visual design elements, concepts, and media. Visual thinking through problem-solving exercises utilizing line, shape, form, texture, tone, color and space as well as the concepts of focal point, unity, variety, direction/movement, motif/pattern, and balance in a progressively complex format insures the understanding of compositional structures. The expressive possibilities of a variety of materials are also explored.
O'Brien, P MW 05:30 PM-08:30 PM DOWER 273 3.0 AAPP
ART 0104-002 (21007) DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS
ART 0104 DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS (3)
This course explores the interaction of universal visual design elements, concepts, and media. Visual thinking through problem-solving exercises utilizing line, shape, form, texture, tone, color and space as well as the concepts of focal point, unity, variety, direction/movement, motif/pattern, and balance in a progressively complex format insures the understanding of compositional structures. The expressive possibilities of a variety of materials are also explored.
Green, A TR 11:30 AM-02:30 PM DOWER 273 3.0 AAPP
ART 0104-003 (20012) DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS
ART 0104 DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS (3)
This course explores the interaction of universal visual design elements, concepts, and media. Visual thinking through problem-solving exercises utilizing line, shape, form, texture, tone, color and space as well as the concepts of focal point, unity, variety, direction/movement, motif/pattern, and balance in a progressively complex format insures the understanding of compositional structures. The expressive possibilities of a variety of materials are also explored.
Hurd, C TR 08:15 AM-11:15 AM DOWER 273 3.0 AAPP
ART 0104-004 (20531) DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS
ART 0104 DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS (3)
This course explores the interaction of universal visual design elements, concepts, and media. Visual thinking through problem-solving exercises utilizing line, shape, form, texture, tone, color and space as well as the concepts of focal point, unity, variety, direction/movement, motif/pattern, and balance in a progressively complex format insures the understanding of compositional structures. The expressive possibilities of a variety of materials are also explored.
Shapleigh, D MWF 09:20 AM-11:20 AM DOWER 273 3.0 AAPP
ART 0105-001 (20030) THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN
ART 0105 THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN (3)
This course will address the basic fundamentals of three-dimensional design including mass, volume, line, space, surface, and texture with basic materials.� Students will learn a shared vocabulary of visual and verbal concepts as tools to design and construct three-dimensional objects.� These concepts and theories will be investigated through projects that explore visual problem-solving exercises for uses in two-dimensional and three-dimensional art.� Classes will be a combination of studio, lecture, and critique/discussion sessions.
Montgomery, S TR 08:15 AM-11:00 AM DOWER 271 3.0
ART 0105-002 (21008) THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN
ART 0105 THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN (3)
This course will address the basic fundamentals of three-dimensional design including mass, volume, line, space, surface, and texture with basic materials.� Students will learn a shared vocabulary of visual and verbal concepts as tools to design and construct three-dimensional objects.� These concepts and theories will be investigated through projects that explore visual problem-solving exercises for uses in two-dimensional and three-dimensional art.� Classes will be a combination of studio, lecture, and critique/discussion sessions.
Montgomery, S TR 11:15 AM-02:00 PM DOWER 271 3.0
ART 0106-003 (20753) ART SURVEY: PREHIST-MIDDLE AGE
ART 0106 ART SURVEY: PREHISTORIC TO MIDDLE AGES (3)
Major representative works of western art and architecture from prehistoric times through the middle ages will be presented from a critical and historical viewpoint. The student will be introduced to the aesthetic and philosophical principles that underlie all art as well as to the relationship between the visual arts and the culture and society which produced them.
STAFF MW 11:30 AM-12:45 PM DOWER 268 3.0 AAPP
ART 0107-003 (20029) ART SURVEY:RENAISSANCE-PRESENT
ART 0107 ART SURVEY: RENAISSANCE TO PRESENT (3)
The study of western art and architecture from the Renaissance to the present will be presented under the same format as ART 0106.
Imeh, I TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM DOWER 127 3.0 AAPP
ART 0108-001 (20940) COMPUTER GRAPHICS I
ART 0108 COMPUTER GRAPHICS FOR ART APPLICATIONS I (3)
This introductory computer graphics course allows the student to explore the creative, visual and artistic possibilities which the microcomputer offers. Class work and lab time on the computer are supplemented with lectures on computer generated art and its potential. Lectures assume no previous knowledge of computers or programming. Students create a variety of projects in the form of slides, animations, and printouts.
STAFF MW 05:30 PM-08:30 PM DOWER 166 3.0 AAPP
ART 0108-002 (20008) COMPUTER GRAPHICS I
ART 0108 COMPUTER GRAPHICS FOR ART APPLICATIONS I (3)
This introductory computer graphics course allows the student to explore the creative, visual and artistic possibilities which the microcomputer offers. Class work and lab time on the computer are supplemented with lectures on computer generated art and its potential. Lectures assume no previous knowledge of computers or programming. Students create a variety of projects in the form of slides, animations, and printouts.
Keim, B ONLINE 3.0 AAPP
ART 0108-003 (20551) COMPUTER GRAPHICS I
ART 0108 COMPUTER GRAPHICS FOR ART APPLICATIONS I (3)
This introductory computer graphics course allows the student to explore the creative, visual and artistic possibilities which the microcomputer offers. Class work and lab time on the computer are supplemented with lectures on computer generated art and its potential. Lectures assume no previous knowledge of computers or programming. Students create a variety of projects in the form of slides, animations, and printouts.
STAFF MW 11:30 AM-02:30 PM DOWER 142 3.0 AAPP
ART 0109-001 (20460) WRITING FOR ART AND THE ARTIST
ART 0109 WRITING FOR ART AND THE ARTIST (3)
This course is an exercise in writing about visual arts.� The course is not about writing or about art, but rather will explore the intricacies of writing in the field of visual arts.� Students will learn how to utilize descriptive language, persuasive writing, practical research, critique, analyzing, and interpretation across all mediums, with a special focus on self-promotion through various forms of media.
PR Imeh, I TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM DOWER 268 3.0
ART 0201-001 (20481) PRINTMAKING 1
ART 0201 PRINTMAKING I (3)
The basic techniques in intaglio and relief printmaking will be explored. The intaglio procedures of line etching, aquatint, sugarlift, and soft ground will be introduced. Collographs (a multimedia technique) and woodcuts (a relief printing process) will also be utilized. Students will create a series of prints in the various techniques and will develop an awareness of the visual and technical aspects of an original print.
PR Wainright, J MW 11:30 AM-02:30 PM DOWER 165 3.0
ART 0204-001 (21006) CERAMICS I
ART 0204 POTTERY I (3)
Provides a workshop exploration of all clay-building techniques including pinch, slab, coil and the wheel. Emphasis is placed on elements of design as they apply to three-dimensional work.
STAFF TR 05:30 PM-08:30 PM DOWER 168 3.0
ART 0205-001 (20750) SCULPTURE 1
ART 0205 SCULPTURE I (3)
Provides an elementary consideration of sculpture through form and composition and includes studies in clay and plaster. There is some work from the human figure. Techniques include mature constructions, direct building in plaster, and casting into plaster and other materials.
Benoit, T TR 08:15 AM-11:00 AM DOWER 171 3.0
ART 0206-001 (21531) INTRO TO PUBLICATION DESIGN
ART 0206 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLICATION DESIGN (3)
Introduces basic publication design utilizing industry standard software. Basic design skills for small ads and brochures as well as newsletter grid design in a digital environment, output and offset printing will be emphasized. Students will learn the history of graphic design, study typography, and the basics of design in different cultures to help them understand the creative process. Students evaluate works of art and leave with a wide range of art projects in order to understand the medium of digital�publication. No prior computer experience necessary.
Wainright, J MW 08:15 AM-11:00 AM DOWER 142 3.0 AAPP
ART 0212-001 (20459) COMPUTER GRAPHICS II
ART 0212 COMPUTER GRAPHICS FOR ART APPLICATIONS II (3)
Computer Graphics for Art Applications II is designed to be a sequel to the first semester for computer graphics. The format is slide lectures, classroom, and studio lab time.� As in the first semester of computer graphics, students have a hands-on experience with various microcomputers. Students also create images via the computer with programming and graphics software utilization in 2-D and 3-D designing.
PR O'Brien, P MW 11:15 AM-02:00 PM DOWER 3.0
ART 0215-001 (21471) INTRODUCTION TO PHOTOGRAPHY
ART 0215 INTRODUCTION TO PHOTOGRAPHY (3)
Examines techniques and applications of photography. Areas of study include camera operation, film selection, lenses, filters, lighting, composition, and digital monochrome and color image processing and manipulation. The history of the medium and its communicative properties also are discussed.
Bloomfield, P MW 05:30 PM-08:30 PM DOWER 142 3.0
ART 0265-001 (20748) ANIMATION II
ART 0265 ANIMATION II (3)
This studio course will transition away from traditional animation to work created with open source and licensed software in animation and computer graphics.� Students will learn comprehension of digital software through lesson explorations and projects.� Formats of storyboarding, character development, story structure, sequence, and motion will be expanded upon in this course.� Proper workflow habits will be established to complete short animated films, and the use of a graphics tablet will be required.� Concepts staging, visual hierarchy, the language of moving images, and audio will be understood in relation to current and historical animation.� Students will also explore methods of social media interaction, and posting projects on the web.
PR Ramirez, G TR 11:15 AM-02:00 PM DOWER 142 3.0
ART 0303-001 (20458) PRINTMAKING II
ART 0303 PRINTMAKING II (3)
A studio course which will further explore and develop the techniques of intaglio, relief, stencil and/or planographic printmaking. The emphasis will be on utilizing the various techniques introduced in Printmaking I and developing a deeper understanding of the visual and technical aspects of an original print. The use of color in the media of concentration will be explored.
PR Wainright, J W 03:10 PM-06:10 PM
M 03:10 PM-04:00 PM
DOWER 165
DOWER 165
3.0
ART 0304-001 (21475) POTTERY II
ART 0304 POTTERY II (3)
Provides an opportunity to explore in-depth any area of clay, including glaze mixing and kiln loading.
PR STAFF TR 03:15 PM-05:15 PM DOWER 168 3.0
ART 0309-001 (21517) SA: ADVANCED DRAWING
ART 0309 ADVANCED DRAWING (3)
A course in Advanced Drawing will develop the student�s own direction and personal expression.
PR Imeh, I 3.0
ART 0311-001 (20015) PAINTING II
ART 0311 PAINTING II (3)
Painting II is a continuation of the fundamental aspects of painting using oil and/or acrylic. Students have the opportunity to paint from the still-life and model in both a representational and non-representational manner. Technical aspects of painting are explored, including the techniques of under-painting and glazing.
PR Shapleigh, D MW 11:30 AM-02:30 PM DOWER 274 3.0
ART 0322-001 (21477) ART EDUCATION CURRICULUM
ART 0322 ART EDUCATION CURRICULUM (3)
Curriculum development at either the elementary and secondary level.� It includes visits to area schools for the purpose of observations and art curriculum study.� A 30-hour field experience required.
Keim, B W 04:30 PM-05:45 PM
Hybrid
DOWER 3.0
ART 0325-001 (21514) IS: ANIMATION III
ART 0325 ANIMATION III (3)
This studio course will introduce focused projects in animation, where students will expand upon their previous knowledge under guidance of the instructor.� Through themed explorations and projects, the course will integrate audio production and editing, open content and comprehension of copyright, dynamic storytelling, script writing, voice-overs, group projects, in addition to social media etiquette and self-promotion.� Use of a graphics tablet will be required.
PR Ramirez, G 3.0
ART 0333-001 (20436) EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY ART
ART 0333 EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY ART (3)
A study of major movements in the art of the first half of the 20th century. The course will examine Fauvism, Expressionism, Cubism, Dada, Surrealism and abstract art.
Scoon, A MW 04:30 PM-05:45 PM DOWER 268 3.0 GDIV
ART 0339-001 (21561) IS: MIXED MEDIA:COLLAGE/ASSEMB
ART 0339 MIXED MEDIA: COLLAGE/ASSEMBLAGE (3)
This course integrates painting processes with materials such as wood, metals, fibers, clay and other tactile two and three dimensional media.
PR Wainright, J 3.0
ART 0343-001 (21478) ILLUSTRATION II
ART 0343 ILLUSTRATION II (3)
In this class, students will design a cohesive series of works based on a theme or topic starting with specific assignments and progressing to more finished, self-realized projects.� Students will create their won multi-sourced research systems to develop an important, cohesive body of work.� Media for the class projects will vary from computer graphics to traditional two-dimensional materials based upon project needs and the consideration of the student's desired project outcomes.� A series of related illustrations will be produced by the end of the semester from which an exhibition of selected works will be displayed.� In addition to this exhibition, concepts on social media as a sharing or gallery options along with its etiquette, advertising rigor, and geotargeting will be presented and discussed.
PR Kimmel, R MW 08:15 AM-11:00 AM DOWER 271 3.0
ART 0344-001 (21501) GRAPHIC DESIGN II
ART 0344 GRAPHIC DESIGN II (3)
Graphic Design II continues the study of the graphic communicative forms used in the advertising media. Emphasis is on analyzing assigned problems and choosing appropriate media for final visual presentation.
PR Ramirez, G TR 08:15 AM-11:00 AM DOWER 142 3.0
ART 0358-001 (20009) AFRICAN AMERICAN ART
ART 0358 AFRICAN AMERICAN ART (3)
This course serves as an introduction to the historical and social forces that shaped the works of artists of African ancestry. The course will examine the roots, themes, styles, content, aesthetics, and ideological dimensions of African American art, as well as the extent to which the art has embodied the spirit of the black experience. Topics may include folk art and slavery, art after emancipation, the Harlem Renaissance, and art and the Civil Rights Movement.
STAFF ONLINE 3.0 UDIV
ART 0358-002 (20746) AFRICAN AMERICAN ART
ART 0358 AFRICAN AMERICAN ART (3)
This course serves as an introduction to the historical and social forces that shaped the works of artists of African ancestry. The course will examine the roots, themes, styles, content, aesthetics, and ideological dimensions of African American art, as well as the extent to which the art has embodied the spirit of the black experience. Topics may include folk art and slavery, art after emancipation, the Harlem Renaissance, and art and the Civil Rights Movement.
Imeh, I ONLINE 3.0 UDIV
ART 0365-001 (20463) GRAPHIC NOVELS FOR THE WEB
ART 0365 GRAPHIC NOVELS FOR THE WEB (3)
This is a studio course with emphasis on the integration of social media with traditional printed comics and graphic novels.� Students will be involved in traditional problem-solving activities with various design concepts such as script writing, drawing and rendering, composition, and story development.� A specific concentration of the class will be on social media as a sharing or gallery option along with its etiquette, advertising rigor, and geo-targeting.� Use of a graphics tablet will be required, in addition to digital subscriptions to online novel-hosting platforms.� Textbooks will consist of an understanding and development of graphic novels, in addition to special quest lecturers and tutorials.
PR Ramirez, G TR 02:15 PM-05:00 PM DOWER 166 3.0
ART 0399-001 (21518) IS:ART THESIS
ART 0399 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-12)
Course work in History, Studio, and Education. (By arrangement only.)
Imeh, I
Biology
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
BIOL 0102-001 (20208) ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY
BIOL 0102 ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY (4)
An introduction to general ecological principles, and an examination of human interactions with, and effects upon, the environment.
Stephens, J TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 221 4.0 LSCI
BIOL 0102 Choose One Lab - 0LA
20259
ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF T 08:15 AM-10:05 AM WILSN 215 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LB
20260
ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF T 12:45 PM-02:35 PM WILSN 215 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LC
20261
ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF W 08:15 AM-10:05 AM WILSN 215 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LD
20262
ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF M 11:30 AM-01:20 PM WILSN 215 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LE
20263
ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF M 01:40 PM-03:30 PM WILSN 215 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LF
21038
ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF F 12:35 PM-02:25 PM WILSN 215 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LG
20925
ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF W 12:35 PM-02:25 PM WILSN 215 .0 LSCI
BIOL 0102-002 (20209) ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY
BIOL 0102 ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY (4)
An introduction to general ecological principles, and an examination of human interactions with, and effects upon, the environment.
Weglarz, K MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM WILSN 221 4.0 LSCI
BIOL 0102 Choose One Lab - 0LA
20259
ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF T 08:15 AM-10:05 AM WILSN 215 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LB
20260
ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF T 12:45 PM-02:35 PM WILSN 215 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LC
20261
ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF W 08:15 AM-10:05 AM WILSN 215 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LD
20262
ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF M 11:30 AM-01:20 PM WILSN 215 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LE
20263
ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF M 01:40 PM-03:30 PM WILSN 215 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LF
21038
ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF F 12:35 PM-02:25 PM WILSN 215 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LG
20925
ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF W 12:35 PM-02:25 PM WILSN 215 .0 LSCI
BIOL 0102-003 (21037) ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY
BIOL 0102 ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY (4)
An introduction to general ecological principles, and an examination of human interactions with, and effects upon, the environment.
Weglarz, K MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM WILSN 221 4.0 LSCI
BIOL 0102 Choose One Lab - 0LA
20259
ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF T 08:15 AM-10:05 AM WILSN 215 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LB
20260
ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF T 12:45 PM-02:35 PM WILSN 215 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LC
20261
ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF W 08:15 AM-10:05 AM WILSN 215 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LD
20262
ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF M 11:30 AM-01:20 PM WILSN 215 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LE
20263
ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF M 01:40 PM-03:30 PM WILSN 215 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LF
21038
ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF F 12:35 PM-02:25 PM WILSN 215 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LG
20925
ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF W 12:35 PM-02:25 PM WILSN 215 .0 LSCI
BIOL 0104-001 (20268) HUMAN BIOLOGY
BIOL 0104 HUMAN BIOLOGY (4)
Human Biology introduces the structure and function of the human body. Students will study the major systems of the human body, including reproduction, digestion and nutrition, circulation, respiration, nervous and hormonal control and locomotion through examination of and non-invasive experimentation with their own bodies, computer simulations, reading and attending lecture/discussions.
Porter, K ONLINE 4.0 LSCI
BIOL 0104 Choose One Lab - 0LA
20273
HUMAN BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF F 08:15 AM-10:05 AM WILSN 224 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LB
20274
HUMAN BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF F 11:30 AM-01:20 PM WILSN 224 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LC
20276
HUMAN BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF M 08:15 AM-10:05 AM WILSN 224 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LD
20278
HUMAN BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF M 11:30 AM-01:20 PM WILSN 224 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LE
21040
HUMAN BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF F 01:40 PM-03:30 PM WILSN 224 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LF
21041
HUMAN BIOLOGY - LAB Magarian, K M 01:40 PM-03:30 PM WILSN 224 .0 LSCI
BIOL 0104-002 (20269) HUMAN BIOLOGY
BIOL 0104 HUMAN BIOLOGY (4)
Human Biology introduces the structure and function of the human body. Students will study the major systems of the human body, including reproduction, digestion and nutrition, circulation, respiration, nervous and hormonal control and locomotion through examination of and non-invasive experimentation with their own bodies, computer simulations, reading and attending lecture/discussions.
Porter, K ONLINE 4.0 LSCI
BIOL 0104 Choose One Lab - 0LA
20273
HUMAN BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF F 08:15 AM-10:05 AM WILSN 224 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LB
20274
HUMAN BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF F 11:30 AM-01:20 PM WILSN 224 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LC
20276
HUMAN BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF M 08:15 AM-10:05 AM WILSN 224 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LD
20278
HUMAN BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF M 11:30 AM-01:20 PM WILSN 224 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LE
21040
HUMAN BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF F 01:40 PM-03:30 PM WILSN 224 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LF
21041
HUMAN BIOLOGY - LAB Magarian, K M 01:40 PM-03:30 PM WILSN 224 .0 LSCI
BIOL 0104-003 (21039) HUMAN BIOLOGY
BIOL 0104 HUMAN BIOLOGY (4)
Human Biology introduces the structure and function of the human body. Students will study the major systems of the human body, including reproduction, digestion and nutrition, circulation, respiration, nervous and hormonal control and locomotion through examination of and non-invasive experimentation with their own bodies, computer simulations, reading and attending lecture/discussions.
STAFF TR 08:15 AM-09:30 AM WILSN 211 4.0 LSCI
BIOL 0104 Choose One Lab - 0LA
20273
HUMAN BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF F 08:15 AM-10:05 AM WILSN 224 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LB
20274
HUMAN BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF F 11:30 AM-01:20 PM WILSN 224 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LC
20276
HUMAN BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF M 08:15 AM-10:05 AM WILSN 224 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LD
20278
HUMAN BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF M 11:30 AM-01:20 PM WILSN 224 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LE
21040
HUMAN BIOLOGY - LAB STAFF F 01:40 PM-03:30 PM WILSN 224 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LF
21041
HUMAN BIOLOGY - LAB Magarian, K M 01:40 PM-03:30 PM WILSN 224 .0 LSCI
BIOL 0106-001 (20280) BIOLOGY TODAY
BIOL 0106 BIOLOGY TODAY (4)
An introduction to the study of cells, cellular reproduction, inheritance and the gene, molecular genetics, and the development of organisms. Concentrates on human genetics and development. Investigates the role of biotechnology in genetics and development.
STAFF ONLINE 4.0 LSCI
BIOL 0106 Choose One Lab - 0LA
20281
BIOLOGY TODAY - LAB STAFF M 09:20 AM-11:15 AM SCI 223 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LB
20282
BIOLOGY TODAY - LAB STAFF R 08:15 AM-10:05 AM SCI 223 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LC
20283
BIOLOGY TODAY - LAB STAFF F 09:20 AM-11:15 AM SCI 223 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LD
20284
BIOLOGY TODAY - LAB STAFF W 08:15 AM-10:05 AM SCI 223 .0 LSCI
BIOL 0106-002 (21042) BIOLOGY TODAY
BIOL 0106 BIOLOGY TODAY (4)
An introduction to the study of cells, cellular reproduction, inheritance and the gene, molecular genetics, and the development of organisms. Concentrates on human genetics and development. Investigates the role of biotechnology in genetics and development.
STAFF MWF 12:35 PM-01:25 PM WILSN 221 4.0 LSCI
BIOL 0106 Choose One Lab - 0LA
20281
BIOLOGY TODAY - LAB STAFF M 09:20 AM-11:15 AM SCI 223 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LB
20282
BIOLOGY TODAY - LAB STAFF R 08:15 AM-10:05 AM SCI 223 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LC
20283
BIOLOGY TODAY - LAB STAFF F 09:20 AM-11:15 AM SCI 223 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LD
20284
BIOLOGY TODAY - LAB STAFF W 08:15 AM-10:05 AM SCI 223 .0 LSCI
BIOL 0128-001 (20285) GENERAL BIOLOGY II
BIOL 0128 GENERAL BIOLOGY II (4)
An introduction to the patterns and processes of evolution.� Topics include diversity, adaptations,�and ecological relationships.� This course will focus on the methods of inquiry, collection and analysis of data, and interpretation and presentation of results.�
Hanselman, J MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM WILSN 221 4.0
BIOL 0128 Choose One Lab - 0LA
20287
GENERAL BIOLOGY II - LAB Hanselman, J M 12:35 PM-03:25 PM SCI 221 .0
Lab - 0LB
20288
GENERAL BIOLOGY II - LAB Hanselman, J R 12:45 PM-03:35 PM SCI 221 .0
Lab - 0LC
20289
GENERAL BIOLOGY II - LAB Grobe, C W 12:35 PM-03:25 PM SCI 221 .0
Lab - 0LD
20290
GENERAL BIOLOGY II - LAB Weglarz, K T 12:45 PM-03:35 PM SCI 221 .0
BIOL 0128-002 (20286) GENERAL BIOLOGY II
BIOL 0128 GENERAL BIOLOGY II (4)
An introduction to the patterns and processes of evolution.� Topics include diversity, adaptations,�and ecological relationships.� This course will focus on the methods of inquiry, collection and analysis of data, and interpretation and presentation of results.�
Grobe, C MWF 08:15 AM-09:05 AM WILSN 221 4.0
BIOL 0128 Choose One Lab - 0LA
20287
GENERAL BIOLOGY II - LAB Hanselman, J M 12:35 PM-03:25 PM SCI 221 .0
Lab - 0LB
20288
GENERAL BIOLOGY II - LAB Hanselman, J R 12:45 PM-03:35 PM SCI 221 .0
Lab - 0LC
20289
GENERAL BIOLOGY II - LAB Grobe, C W 12:35 PM-03:25 PM SCI 221 .0
Lab - 0LD
20290
GENERAL BIOLOGY II - LAB Weglarz, K T 12:45 PM-03:35 PM SCI 221 .0
BIOL 0129-001 (20291) GENERAL BIOLOGY I
BIOL 0129 GENERAL BIOLOGY I (4)
An introduction to the chemical foundations of life, cell structure and function, inheritance, sexual reproduction, and embryonic development. This course will focus on methods if inquiry, collection and analysis of data, and interpretation and presentation of results.
White, R TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM WILSN 221 4.0
BIOL 0129 Choose One Lab - 0LA
20292
GENERAL BIOLOGY I - LAB White, R T 12:45 PM-03:35 PM SCI 219 .0
Lab - 0LB
20293
GENERAL BIOLOGY I - LAB Stephens, J W 12:35 PM-03:25 PM SCI 219 .0
Lab - 0LC
20294
GENERAL BIOLOGY I - LAB STAFF F 12:35 PM-03:25 PM SCI 219 .0
Lab - 0LD
20428
GENERAL BIOLOGY I - LAB White, R R 12:45 PM-03:35 PM SCI 219 .0
Lab - 0LE
20926
GENERAL BIOLOGY I - LAB Stephens, J M 12:35 PM-03:25 PM SCI 219 .0
BIOL 0129-002 (21048) GENERAL BIOLOGY I
BIOL 0129 GENERAL BIOLOGY I (4)
An introduction to the chemical foundations of life, cell structure and function, inheritance, sexual reproduction, and embryonic development. This course will focus on methods if inquiry, collection and analysis of data, and interpretation and presentation of results.
White, R TR 08:15 AM-09:30 AM WILSN 221 4.0
BIOL 0129 Choose One Lab - 0LA
20292
GENERAL BIOLOGY I - LAB White, R T 12:45 PM-03:35 PM SCI 219 .0
Lab - 0LB
20293
GENERAL BIOLOGY I - LAB Stephens, J W 12:35 PM-03:25 PM SCI 219 .0
Lab - 0LC
20294
GENERAL BIOLOGY I - LAB STAFF F 12:35 PM-03:25 PM SCI 219 .0
Lab - 0LD
20428
GENERAL BIOLOGY I - LAB White, R R 12:45 PM-03:35 PM SCI 219 .0
Lab - 0LE
20926
GENERAL BIOLOGY I - LAB Stephens, J M 12:35 PM-03:25 PM SCI 219 .0
BIOL 0180-004 (20296) INTRODUCTORY SEMINAR IN BIOL
BIOL 0180 INTRODUCTORY SEMINAR IN BIOLOGY (1)
A seminar course to introduce first-year and transfer students to the theory and practice of biological inquiry. Students will examine the process of scientific model creation and experimental design. Critical thinking and the mathematical, literacy and communication skills required for the study of biology will be emphasized. The Biology Departmental Objectives and portfolio assessment process will be introduced.
Grobe, C M 10:25 AM-11:15 AM SCI 213 1.0
BIOL 0201-001 (20297) GENERAL ECOLOGY
BIOL 0201 GENERAL ECOLOGY (4)
Study of the interactions between organisms and their environment. Topics covered include: evolution, patterns of distribution, factors affecting distribution, population dynamics, competition, predation, parasitism, mutualism, energy and nutrient flow in ecosystems, and the analysis of the process of succession. Current ecological problems will be discussed throughout the course. Labs will involve field experiences.
PR Darling, R M 12:35 PM-03:25 PM
MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM
WILSN 225
WILSN 225
4.0
BIOL 0203-001 (20299) GENETICS
BIOL 0203 GENETICS (4)
An introduction to inheritance, including molecular, quantitative, and population genetics. Laboratory activities include computer simulations, molecular modeling, collection and analysis of data, and DNA analysis.
PR Weng, M TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM SCI 213 4.0
BIOL 0203 Choose One Lab - 01A
20300
GENETICS - LAB Weng, M TR 11:10 AM-12:35 PM SCI 223 .0
BIOL 0205-001 (20301) CELL BIOLOGY LECT-LAB
BIOL 0205 CELL BIOLOGY (4)
A study of the structure, function, and life history of cells and their components. Consideration of relationships among cell organelles and between cells and their environments.
PR Christensen, A M 12:35 PM-03:25 PM
MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM
SCI 214
SCI 213
4.0
BIOL 0206-001 (20302) PLANTS AND HUMAN SOCIETY
BIOL 0206 PLANTS AND HUMAN SOCIETY (3)
This course will explore the relationship between plants and humans. We will focus on historical relationships such as the origins and influences of agriculture on the development of human societies, as well as current and potential impacts of plants and plant products on medicine, biotechnology, and economics. Students will be introduced to some basic principles of plant biology and ecology in order to understand pertinent aspects of agriculturally, medicinally, and economically significant plant groups. Display material, group work, and student presentations will be a significant part of this course.
PR Grobe, C ONLINE 3.0
BIOL 0209-001 (21495) MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY
BIOL 0209 MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY (4)
An introductory study of microorganisms. Principles of structure, metabolism, and genetics of microbes, are considered within a clinical framework. Application of basic principles focuses on medically important microorganisms, their transmission, and mechanisms of pathogenicity. Laboratory includes basic techniques for the study, enumeration, and identification of bacteria, clinical applications, and disease case studies. Students who have completed BIOL 0223 may not receive credit for this course.
Berman, K MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM WILSN 4.0
BIOL 0209 Choose One Lab - 0LA
21498
MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY - LAB STAFF TR 08:15 AM-09:40 AM SCI 214 .0
Lab - 0LB
21497
MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY - LAB STAFF TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM SCI 214 .0
Lab - 0LC
21499
MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY - LAB STAFF TR 02:15 PM-03:40 PM SCI 214 .0
BIOL 0223-001 (20303) MICROBIOLOGY
BIOL 0223 MICROBIOLOGY (4)
Provides an introductory study of the microorganisms with emphasis on bacteriology. Consideration of clinical and environmental aspects, principles of structure, metabolism, and genetics of Prokaryotes. Laboratory includes basic techniques for study, enumerations, and identification of bacteria. Students who have completed BIOL 0209�may not receive credit for this course.
PR Berman, K MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM WILSN 211 4.0
BIOL 0223 Choose One Lab - 01A
20304
MICROBIOLOGY - LAB Berman, K TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM SCI 214 .0
Lab - 01B
20305
MICROBIOLOGY - LAB Berman, K TR 11:15 AM-12:40 PM SCI 214 .0
BIOL 0230-001 (20306) EVOLUTION
BIOL 0230 EVOLUTION (3)
A discussion of theories of evolution, evidence for evolution, genetic variability and changes in populations, and evolutionary patterns of the past.
PR Stephens, J TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM WILSN 211 3.0
BIOL 0233-001 (20468) ENVIRONMENTAL LEGISLATION
BIOL 0233 ENVIRONMENTAL LEGISLATION (3)
A detailed examination of the need for, and biological basis for, the standards established by existing, or proposed, federal and state legislation. The lectures, which will deal with topics such as the National Environment Policy Act and the Water Pollution Control Act, will be supplemented by analysis and discussion of environmental impact statements and court decisions dealing with each of the topics covered.
PR Parshall, T TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM WILSN 221 3.0
BIOL 0237-001 (20307) HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS. I
BIOL 0237 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I (4)
Utilizes a general approach to the human body with emphasis on structure and function to show ways in which various organ systems interact. The integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems and sense organs are studied.
PR Ramsay, J MWF 08:15 AM-09:05 AM WILSN 211 4.0 LSCI
BIOL 0237 Choose One Lab - 0LA
20308
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS. I - LAB STAFF ONLINE .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LB
20309
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS. I - LAB STAFF R 12:45 PM-03:35 PM WILSN 222 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LC
20310
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS. I - LAB Ramsay, J T 12:45 PM-03:35 PM WILSN 222 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LD
20530
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS. I - LAB Ramsay, J T 08:15 AM-11:00 AM WILSN 222 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LE
20543
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS. I - LAB STAFF ONLINE .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LF
21046
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS. I - LAB STAFF M 12:35 PM-03:25 PM WILSN 222 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LG
21047
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS. I - LAB STAFF W 12:35 PM-03:25 PM WILSN 222 .0 LSCI
BIOL 0237-002 (20542) HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS. I
BIOL 0237 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I (4)
Utilizes a general approach to the human body with emphasis on structure and function to show ways in which various organ systems interact. The integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems and sense organs are studied.
PR Ramsay, J ONLINE 4.0 LSCI
BIOL 0237 Choose One Lab - 0LA
20308
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS. I - LAB STAFF ONLINE .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LB
20309
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS. I - LAB STAFF R 12:45 PM-03:35 PM WILSN 222 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LC
20310
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS. I - LAB Ramsay, J T 12:45 PM-03:35 PM WILSN 222 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LD
20530
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS. I - LAB Ramsay, J T 08:15 AM-11:00 AM WILSN 222 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LE
20543
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS. I - LAB STAFF ONLINE .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LF
21046
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS. I - LAB STAFF M 12:35 PM-03:25 PM WILSN 222 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LG
21047
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS. I - LAB STAFF W 12:35 PM-03:25 PM WILSN 222 .0 LSCI
BIOL 0237-003 (21044) HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS. I
BIOL 0237 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I (4)
Utilizes a general approach to the human body with emphasis on structure and function to show ways in which various organ systems interact. The integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems and sense organs are studied.
PR Christensen, A TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 211 4.0 LSCI
BIOL 0237 Choose One Lab - 0LA
20308
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS. I - LAB STAFF ONLINE .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LB
20309
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS. I - LAB STAFF R 12:45 PM-03:35 PM WILSN 222 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LC
20310
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS. I - LAB Ramsay, J T 12:45 PM-03:35 PM WILSN 222 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LD
20530
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS. I - LAB Ramsay, J T 08:15 AM-11:00 AM WILSN 222 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LE
20543
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS. I - LAB STAFF ONLINE .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LF
21046
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS. I - LAB STAFF M 12:35 PM-03:25 PM WILSN 222 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LG
21047
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS. I - LAB STAFF W 12:35 PM-03:25 PM WILSN 222 .0 LSCI
BIOL 0239-001 (20312) HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS II
BIOL 0239 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II (4)
Utilizes a general approach to the human body with emphasis on structure and function to show ways in which the various organ systems interact. The respiratory, circulatory, digestive, endocrine, and urinary systems as well as temperature regulation and fluid balance are studied.
PR McKeown, K TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 222 4.0
BIOL 0239 Choose One Lab - 0LA
20313
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS II - LAB STAFF ONLINE .0
Lab - 0LB
20314
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS II - LAB STAFF ONLINE .0
Lab - 0LC
20315
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS II - LAB STAFF R 12:45 PM-03:35 PM WILSN 224 .0
BIOL 0239-002 (20311) HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS II
BIOL 0239 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II (4)
Utilizes a general approach to the human body with emphasis on structure and function to show ways in which the various organ systems interact. The respiratory, circulatory, digestive, endocrine, and urinary systems as well as temperature regulation and fluid balance are studied.
PR McKeown, K ONLINE 4.0
BIOL 0239 Choose One Lab - 0LA
20313
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS II - LAB STAFF ONLINE .0
Lab - 0LB
20314
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS II - LAB STAFF ONLINE .0
Lab - 0LC
20315
HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS II - LAB STAFF R 12:45 PM-03:35 PM WILSN 224 .0
BIOL 0246-001 (21049) PILOT: PLANT COMMUNITIES AND F Lovejoy, D M 01:40 PM-04:30 PM WILSN 223 3.0
BIOL 0278-001 (20316) BIOSTATISTICS
BIOL 0278 BIOSTATISTICS (3)
This course will introduce and train students in the analysis of biological data.� Students will learn about univariate parametric and non-parametric statistical tests using case study examples from a variety of biological fields.� Students will be expected to analyze data using graphical and mathematical techniques, utilizing open source (e.g. R) and/or proprietary software (e.g. SPSS).
Weng, M TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM SCI 213 3.0 ARSN
BIOL 0280-001 (20544) SEM:BIOTECHNOLOGY Porter, K T 11:15 AM-12:30 PM SCI 213 1.0
BIOL 0282-001 (20715) SEM: GREAT DISCOVERIES Grobe, C ONLINE 1.0
BIOL 0283-001 (21051) SEM:BIOLOGY BEHIND PREGNANCY Stephens, J W 10:25 AM-11:15 AM SCI 213 1.0
BIOL 0289-001 (20720) HIST AND NAT OF SCIENTIFIC KNOW
BIOL 0289 BIOLOGY SEMINAR: HISTORY AND NATURE OF SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE (1)
This seminar will address the current and historical practice of biology as an experimental science. We will examine how our current understanding of several areas of biology has developed and what the criteria for scientific knowledge and practice are now. This course will meet for one hour of weekly discussion. Successful completion of the course will require presentation of a portfolio documenting the student�s progress in meeting the departmental learning goals.
STAFF ONLINE 1.0
BIOL 0340-001 (20716) FOREST ECOLOGY
BIOL 0340 FOREST ECOLOGY (3)
Students in this course will investigate ecological concepts related to forest ecosystems around the world with particular emphasis on forests of eastern North America.� Topics may include: factors affecting forest distribution and composition, impacts of natural and human disturbances, how forests change through time, and conservation/management issues related to impacts of climate change, invasive species, and habitat alterations.
PR Parshall, T TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 223 3.0
BIOL 0377-001 (20718) RESEARCH EXP: BIOTECH
BIOL 0377 RESEARCH EXPERIENCE (3)
Using prior knowledge of specific biological concepts, students will design, implement, analyze, and interpret the results of a field or laboratory research project.� Each course uses this inquiry-based approach in a specific area of biology.� Students will be trained in all aspects of data collection, including use of the equipment and technologies necessary.� The course has a set meeting time, although projects may require additional research time throughout the week.� This course satisfies one of the required 300-level requirements of the biology major.� May be repeated for credit when course content differs. �
Porter, K T 08:15 AM-11:00 AM SCI 219 3.0
BIOL 0377-003 (21036) RE SEARCH EXP: PALEOECOLOGY
BIOL 0377 RESEARCH EXPERIENCE (3)
Using prior knowledge of specific biological concepts, students will design, implement, analyze, and interpret the results of a field or laboratory research project.� Each course uses this inquiry-based approach in a specific area of biology.� Students will be trained in all aspects of data collection, including use of the equipment and technologies necessary.� The course has a set meeting time, although projects may require additional research time throughout the week.� This course satisfies one of the required 300-level requirements of the biology major.� May be repeated for credit when course content differs. �
Hanselman, J R 08:15 AM-11:00 AM SCI 221 3.0
BIOL 0380-001 (20719) SENIOR SEMINAR
BIOL 0380 SENIOR SEMINAR (1)
This course will serve as a means to assess the students� knowledge of the Biology Department�s learning outcomes, especially the skill goals. The portfolio will be composed of several items including, but not limited to, the students� ability to perform experiments and investigations, analyze data, and interpret research. Students will also be given guidance on career options, specific to their needs. The course will be offered during fall semester so students may take advantage of advice during the period of time that graduate school applications are due. For those not planning on attending graduate school, job application skills will be discussed (e.g. writing a cover letter and r�sum�, interviewing).
PR Grobe, C T 12:45 PM-01:35 PM SCI 213 1.0
BIOL 0390-001 (21527) TCH SEC SCHOOL BIOLOGY
BIOL 0390 TEACHING SECONDARY SCHOOL BIOLOGY (3)
This course emphasizes inquiry-based instruction in a culturally-diverse secondary biology classroom. Students will be introduced to the Next Generation Science Standards, will design lessons using innovative pedagogical techniques, and will develop a range of formative and summative assessments.�Students will be expected to construct a thematic unit that demonstrates their ability to teach biology at the secondary level.�Students will practice their planning and implementation skills as a function of proper classroom management and demonstrate those skills during in-class presentations and during the field experience.�Course activities will emphasize reflective teaching and encourage effective lesson planning for all secondary students.�A 30-hour pre-practicum field experience in a secondary biology classroom is required.�This course may count toward a 300-level Biology major requirement.
PR Giuliano, F TR 08:15 AM-09:30 AM WILSN 309 3.0
BIOL 0399-001 (21535) IS: EFFECTS OF MELATONIN ON TB
BIOL 0399 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (1-3)
Directed research in biology with the student conducting a research project under supervision of an instructor. Research projects should involve investigation of a biological problem using the scientific method. The results of the study should be reported in the form of a scientific research paper and presented in an oral presentation to the department. Three or more credits of BIOL 0399 may be applied toward the biology major. A maximum of 6 credits of BIOL 0299 and BIOL 0399 may be applied toward the biology major.
White, R
BIOL 0399-002 (21544) IS: FUNC MORPH TRTLE LMBS RLT
BIOL 0399 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (1-3)
Directed research in biology with the student conducting a research project under supervision of an instructor. Research projects should involve investigation of a biological problem using the scientific method. The results of the study should be reported in the form of a scientific research paper and presented in an oral presentation to the department. Three or more credits of BIOL 0399 may be applied toward the biology major. A maximum of 6 credits of BIOL 0299 and BIOL 0399 may be applied toward the biology major.
Ramsay, J
BIOL 0399-003 (21549) IS: POPULATION GENETICS
BIOL 0399 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (1-3)
Directed research in biology with the student conducting a research project under supervision of an instructor. Research projects should involve investigation of a biological problem using the scientific method. The results of the study should be reported in the form of a scientific research paper and presented in an oral presentation to the department. Three or more credits of BIOL 0399 may be applied toward the biology major. A maximum of 6 credits of BIOL 0299 and BIOL 0399 may be applied toward the biology major.
Stephens, J
Chemical and Physical Sciences
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
ASTR 0101-001 (20215) ASTRONOMY
ASTR 0101 ASTRONOMY (3)
A broad introductory survey of astronomy that also provides students with an introduction to scientific methodology and the multifaceted interactions between science, technology, and society. Topics to be covered include the history of astronomy, basic observations of the night sky, the solar system, stars and stellar evolution, supernovae, pulsars, black holes, the Milky Way galaxy and other galaxies, cosmology, and the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence. Several optional observing sessions will be held on clear evenings.
Rees, R MWF 08:15 AM-09:05 AM WILSN 316 3.0 ASCI
ASTR 0101-002 (21052) ASTRONOMY
ASTR 0101 ASTRONOMY (3)
A broad introductory survey of astronomy that also provides students with an introduction to scientific methodology and the multifaceted interactions between science, technology, and society. Topics to be covered include the history of astronomy, basic observations of the night sky, the solar system, stars and stellar evolution, supernovae, pulsars, black holes, the Milky Way galaxy and other galaxies, cosmology, and the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence. Several optional observing sessions will be held on clear evenings.
Rees, R MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM WILSN 300 3.0 ASCI
ASTR 0121-001 (21053) LIFE IN THE UNIVERSE
ASTR 0121 LIFE IN THE UNIVERSE (3)
The Universe contains billions of galaxies, each including billions of stars, and many of those stars might be orbited by a planet harboring life! With those kinds of numbers, many astronomers think it likely that there are other civilizations of intelligent beings elsewhere in the Universe. But if intelligence is common, why haven�t we received unambiguous signals from any of them? This course will investigate the possibility of life elsewhere in the Universe, beginning with a look at life on Earth and the potential for life elsewhere in our solar system, then moving on to consider the more general requirements for life and how they might be met elsewhere. Topics will include the stellar synthesis of the elements necessary for life, recent discoveries of extrasolar planets, stellar and galactic habitability zones, possible modes of communication with other civilizations, and the potential for space travel.
Rees, R MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM WILSN 300 3.0 ASCI
ASTR 0121-002 (21054) LIFE IN THE UNIVERSE
ASTR 0121 LIFE IN THE UNIVERSE (3)
The Universe contains billions of galaxies, each including billions of stars, and many of those stars might be orbited by a planet harboring life! With those kinds of numbers, many astronomers think it likely that there are other civilizations of intelligent beings elsewhere in the Universe. But if intelligence is common, why haven�t we received unambiguous signals from any of them? This course will investigate the possibility of life elsewhere in the Universe, beginning with a look at life on Earth and the potential for life elsewhere in our solar system, then moving on to consider the more general requirements for life and how they might be met elsewhere. Topics will include the stellar synthesis of the elements necessary for life, recent discoveries of extrasolar planets, stellar and galactic habitability zones, possible modes of communication with other civilizations, and the potential for space travel.
Rees, R MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM WILSN 300 3.0 ASCI
CHEM 0103-001 (20216) CHEMISTRY OF THE LIFE SCIENCES
CHEM 0103 CHEMISTRY OF THE LIFE SCIENCES (4)
Provides an understanding of the chemistry of living systems. The course will build from a discussion of basic chemical principles including measurements, nuclear chemistry, atomic and molecular structure, nomenclature, solution chemistry, stoichiometry, gas laws, and acid/base theory. These concepts will then be applied to the study of organic chemistry and biochemistry. Topics will be related to environmental and societal issues when appropriate. Laboratory work is designed to enhance the understanding of fundamental concepts at the practical level. Three hours lecture, one hour discussion, two hours laboratory per week.
Theis, K MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM WILSN 317 4.0 LSCI
CHEM 0103 Choose One Lab - 0LA
20218
CHEMISTRY OF THE LIFE SCI-LAB Theis, K M 01:40 PM-03:30 PM
M 12:35 PM-01:25 PM
SCI 319
WILSN 309
.0 LSCI
Lab - 0LB
20219
CHEMISTRY OF THE LIFE SCI-LAB Theis, K W 01:40 PM-03:30 PM
W 12:35 PM-01:25 PM
SCI 319
WILSN 309
.0 LSCI
CHEM 0109-001 (20324) GEN CHEMISTRY I
CHEM 0109 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I (4)
A broad look at the fundamental concepts of modern chemistry including the mole concept, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, the periodic law, atomic structure, chemical bonding, and gas phase chemistry. Topics will be related to ethical issues, societal impact, and human behavior when appropriate. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.
Theis, K MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM WILSN 314 4.0 LSCI
CHEM 0109 Choose One Lab - 01A
20325
GEN CHEMISTRY I - LAB STAFF M 12:35 PM-03:25 PM SCI 317 .0 LSCI
Lab - 01B
20524
GEN CHEMISTRY I - LAB STAFF T 08:15 AM-11:05 AM SCI 317 .0 LSCI
CHEM 0109-002 (20327) GEN CHEMISTRY I
CHEM 0109 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I (4)
A broad look at the fundamental concepts of modern chemistry including the mole concept, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, the periodic law, atomic structure, chemical bonding, and gas phase chemistry. Topics will be related to ethical issues, societal impact, and human behavior when appropriate. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.
Evanoski-Cole, A MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM WILSN 316 4.0 LSCI
CHEM 0109 Choose One Lab - 02A
20329
GEN CHEMISTRY I - LAB Evanoski-Cole, A T 12:45 PM-03:35 PM SCI 317 .0 LSCI
Lab - 02B
20525
GEN CHEMISTRY I - LAB STAFF R 08:15 AM-11:05 AM SCI 317 .0 LSCI
CHEM 0109-003 (20444) GEN CHEMISTRY I
CHEM 0109 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I (4)
A broad look at the fundamental concepts of modern chemistry including the mole concept, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, the periodic law, atomic structure, chemical bonding, and gas phase chemistry. Topics will be related to ethical issues, societal impact, and human behavior when appropriate. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.
Evanoski-Cole, A TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM WILSN 316 4.0 LSCI
CHEM 0109 Choose One Lab - 03A
20522
GEN CHEMISTRY I - LAB STAFF W 12:35 PM-03:25 PM SCI 317 .0 LSCI
Lab - 03B
20523
GEN CHEMISTRY I - LAB Evanoski-Cole, A R 12:45 PM-03:35 PM SCI 317 .0 LSCI
CHEM 0201-001 (20323) ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I
CHEM 0201 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (4)
The chemistry of carbon is explored. The semester begins with a look at the bonding models and nomenclature used to describe carbon-based molecules. A mechanistic approach to the chemistry of alkenes, alkynes, and dienes is used to provide a context for chemical concepts such as nucleophilicity, electrophilicity, stereochemistry, and resonance. Additionally, the role that kinetics and thermodynamics play in determining product distribution is also considered. Students are required to attend the accompanying laboratory, where they will learn how to safely perform many of the chemical transformations discussed in class. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.
PR Masi, C MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM WILSN 134 4.0
CHEM 0201 Choose One Lab - 0LA
20333
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I - LAB STAFF M 12:35 PM-03:25 PM SCI 316 .0
Lab - 0LB
20334
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I - LAB STAFF T 12:45 PM-03:35 PM SCI 316 .0
Lab - 0LC
20335
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I - LAB Masi, C W 12:35 PM-03:25 PM SCI 316 .0
CHEM 0305-001 (21056) PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I
CHEM 0305 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I (3)
Investigates the structure and properties of matter. The course involves detailed studies of the gas laws, kinetic-molecular theory, thermodynamics, thermochemistry, physical and chemical equilibria, and chemical kinetics.
PR STAFF MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM WILSN 309 3.0
CHEM 0315-001 (20431) BIOCHEMISTRY
CHEM 0315 BIOCHEMISTRY WITH LAB (4)
A course for science majors that combines lecture and discussion to explore the fundamentals of biochemistry. Major topics are protein structure and function, enzyme kinetics and mechanism, and the energetics, intermediates and products of major metabolic pathways. Emphasis will be placed on fundamental concepts such as intermolecular interactions, enzyme catalysis and regulation. The course relies on a solid foundation in general and organic chemistry. Student may receive credit for either CHEM 0315 or CHEM 0313, but no for both.
PR Acevedo, R MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM WILSN 317 4.0
CHEM 0315 Choose One Lab - 01A
20722
BIOCHEMISTRY - LAB Acevedo, R R 08:15 AM-11:05 AM SCI 319 .0
Lab - 01B
21057
BIOCHEMISTRY - LAB Acevedo, R R 12:45 PM-03:35 PM SCI 319 .0
GEOL 0101-001 (21058) PHYSICAL GEOLOGY
GEOL 0101 PHYSICAL GEOLOGY WITH LABORATORY (4)
A broad introductory survey of geology that focuses on the role of plate tectonic theory in providing a fundamental understanding of the Earth as a global system. The course also provides students with an introduction to scientific methodology and to the multifaceted interactions between science, technology and society. Topics to be covered include the minerals and rocks that make up the Earth�s crust, the processes of weathering and erosion that shape the Earth�s surface, the internal structure of the Earth, geological hazards, and energy and mineral resources. The laboratory portion of the course provides a �hands-on� introduction to the practical aspects of physical geology, including the identification of minerals and rocks, the interpretation of topographic and geologic maps, and the development of landforms. The course includes several field trips that involve additional time commitments (on weekends or beyond the normal ending time for the laboratory). Students may receive credit for either GEOL 0101 or GEOL 0102, but not for both. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
Reyes, A MWF 12:35 PM-01:25 PM WILSN 314 4.0 LSCI
GEOL 0101 Choose One Lab - 01A
21059
PHYSICAL GEOLOGY - LAB Reyes, A M 01:40 PM-03:35 PM WILSN 302 .0 LSCI
Lab - 01B
21060
PHYSICAL GEOLOGY - LAB Reyes, A W 01:40 PM-03:35 PM WILSN 302 .0 LSCI
GEOL 0124-001 (20466) GEOLOGIC HAZARDS
GEOL 0124 GEOLOGIC HAZARDS (3)
The Earth is a dynamic planet, whose surface is constantly being modified by the internal processes associated with plate tectonics and by the external processes associated with the hydrologic cycle. Those processes make the Earth an interesting, but sometimes dangerous place to live. This course will explore the factors that shape the Earth�s surface by investigating the potential hazards associated with those processes (including volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides, floods, and climate change) and human attempts to predict, prepare for and respond to such events.
Reyes, A MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM WILSN 302 3.0 ASCI
GEOL 0124-002 (20467) GEOLOGIC HAZARDS
GEOL 0124 GEOLOGIC HAZARDS (3)
The Earth is a dynamic planet, whose surface is constantly being modified by the internal processes associated with plate tectonics and by the external processes associated with the hydrologic cycle. Those processes make the Earth an interesting, but sometimes dangerous place to live. This course will explore the factors that shape the Earth�s surface by investigating the potential hazards associated with those processes (including volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides, floods, and climate change) and human attempts to predict, prepare for and respond to such events.
Reyes, A MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM WILSN 314 3.0 ASCI
GEOL 0205-001 (20725) ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY
GEOL 0205 ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY (3)
The course focuses on geologic principles and applications related to understanding and controlling environmental problems such as soil/air/water contamination, hazardous waste disposal, erosion, geologic hazards ,mining, energy exploration, and resource development.� The history of human development of resources, product use, and our impact on the natural and physical environment is explored through a geological understanding of the Earth.� Current local and global environmental justice issues are investigated through research and an environmental justice field trip.
Weiss, T TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM WILSN 314 3.0 ASCI
GNSC 0101-001 (20330) PHYSICAL SCIENCE
GNSC 0101 PHYSICAL SCIENCE (4)
Includes the basic concepts of physics, chemistry, earth-space science, and the application of scientific methodology to these areas. Topics may include mechanics, heat, sound, light, electricity, magnetism, atomic structure, chemical bonding, plate tectonics, the cycles of the Earth, and astronomy. The relationships of these concepts to societal issues are discussed. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
STAFF TR 08:15 AM-09:30 AM WILSN 314 4.0 LSCI
GNSC 0101 Choose One Lab - 01A
20331
PHYSICAL SCIENCE - LAB Weiss, T T 09:45 AM-11:35 AM WILSN 311 .0 LSCI
Lab - 01B
20332
PHYSICAL SCIENCE - LAB STAFF R 09:45 AM-11:35 AM WILSN 311 .0 LSCI
GNSC 0101-002 (20337) PHYSICAL SCIENCE
GNSC 0101 PHYSICAL SCIENCE (4)
Includes the basic concepts of physics, chemistry, earth-space science, and the application of scientific methodology to these areas. Topics may include mechanics, heat, sound, light, electricity, magnetism, atomic structure, chemical bonding, plate tectonics, the cycles of the Earth, and astronomy. The relationships of these concepts to societal issues are discussed. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
Giuliano, F TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM WILSN 314 4.0 LSCI
GNSC 0101 Choose One Lab - 02A
20338
PHYSICAL SCIENCE - LAB Weiss, T T 11:50 AM-01:40 PM WILSN 311 .0 LSCI
Lab - 02B
20340
PHYSICAL SCIENCE - LAB STAFF R 11:50 AM-01:40 PM WILSN 311 .0 LSCI
GNSC 0101-003 (20547) PHYSICAL SCIENCE
GNSC 0101 PHYSICAL SCIENCE (4)
Includes the basic concepts of physics, chemistry, earth-space science, and the application of scientific methodology to these areas. Topics may include mechanics, heat, sound, light, electricity, magnetism, atomic structure, chemical bonding, plate tectonics, the cycles of the Earth, and astronomy. The relationships of these concepts to societal issues are discussed. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
Weiss, T MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM WILSN 304 4.0 LSCI
GNSC 0101 Choose One Lab - 03A
20548
PHYSICAL SCIENCE - LAB Weiss, T T 09:45 AM-11:35 AM WILSN 311 .0 LSCI
Lab - 03B
20549
PHYSICAL SCIENCE - LAB Weiss, T T 11:50 AM-01:40 PM WILSN 311 .0 LSCI
GNSC 0349-001 (20520) RESEARCH METHODS PHYS SCI
GNSC 0349 RESEARCH METHODS FOR THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES (1)
Students will create a research proposal in preparation for the companion course GNSC/CHEM 0350. As part of the course, students will learn about faculty research areas/expertise, search the literature, formulate a research question and decide on specific aims of their project.� Topics covered to support creating the proposal include writing a draft proposal, responding to reviewers' concerns, experimental design, complying with ethical and safety standards, analyzing and interpreting quantitative data, treatment of experimental error, supporting a scientific claim with data, and communicating results in oral and written form.
Theis, K W 03:40 PM-04:30 PM WILSN 309 1.0
GNSC 0360-001 (20346) METHODS OF SCIENCE ED. PREK-6
GNSC 0360 METHODS OF SCIENCE EDUCATION FOR PRE-K-6 (2)
This course prepares students to teach PreK-6 science.� An activity-based format is used to create a learning environment that fosters inquiry learning and teaching.� Emphasis is placed on the role and use of hands-on materials, resources, and technology that encourage the development of fundamental concepts outlined in the state science frameworks.� Topics may include: inquiry, engineering design, learning theories, the learning cycle, current state and national standards for science education, lesson plan development, and techniques for assessment.
PR Giuliano, F TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM WILSN 309 2.0
GNSC 0360-002 (20347) METHODS OF SCIENCE ED. PREK-6
GNSC 0360 METHODS OF SCIENCE EDUCATION FOR PRE-K-6 (2)
This course prepares students to teach PreK-6 science.� An activity-based format is used to create a learning environment that fosters inquiry learning and teaching.� Emphasis is placed on the role and use of hands-on materials, resources, and technology that encourage the development of fundamental concepts outlined in the state science frameworks.� Topics may include: inquiry, engineering design, learning theories, the learning cycle, current state and national standards for science education, lesson plan development, and techniques for assessment.
PR Giuliano, F TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM WILSN 309 2.0
GNSC 0360-003 (21536) METHODS OF SCIENCE ED. PREK-6
GNSC 0360 METHODS OF SCIENCE EDUCATION FOR PRE-K-6 (2)
This course prepares students to teach PreK-6 science.� An activity-based format is used to create a learning environment that fosters inquiry learning and teaching.� Emphasis is placed on the role and use of hands-on materials, resources, and technology that encourage the development of fundamental concepts outlined in the state science frameworks.� Topics may include: inquiry, engineering design, learning theories, the learning cycle, current state and national standards for science education, lesson plan development, and techniques for assessment.
PR Giuliano, F TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 309 2.0
GNSC 0371-001 (21525) METHODS OF SCIENCE MID SCHL
GNSC 0371 METHODS OF SCIENCE EDUCATION FOR THE MIDDLE SCHOOL (3)
This course emphasizes the inquiry approach to teaching science in a diverse middle school classroom.� Students will be introduced to current state and national science standards and design standards-based lessons and a thematic unit.� Teaching and learning discussions will inform curriculum planning and focus on teacher-student interaction, classroom management strategies, professional responsibilities and reflective practice.� Curriculum planning will include the development of lesson goals that set high expectations, make knowledge accessible for all, are informally and formally assessed, and emphasize laboratory safety.� Students will present lessons to their classmates and in their pre-practicum settings.� A 30-hour pre-practicum experience is required.
PR Giuliano, F TR 08:15 AM-09:30 AM WILSN 309 3.0
GNSC 0373-001 (21526) METHODS OF CHEMISTRY EDUC
GNSC 0373 METHODS OF CHEMISTRY EDUCATION (3)
This course emphasizes the inquiry approach to teaching chemistry in a diverse secondary classroom.� Students will be introduced to current state and national science standards and design standards-based lessons and a thematic unit.� Teaching and learning discussions will inform curriculum planning and focus on teacher-student interaction, classroom management strategies, professional responsibilities and reflective practice.� Curriculum planning will include the development of lesson goals that set high expectations, make knowledge accessible for all, are informally and formally assessed, and emphasize laboratory safety.� Students will present lessons to their classmates and in their pre-practicum settings.� A 30-hour pre-practicum experience is required.
PR Giuliano, F TR 08:15 AM-09:30 AM WILSN 309 3.0
PHSC 0115-001 (20427) GENERAL PHYSICS I
PHSC 0115 GENERAL PHYSICS I (4)
Newtonian mechanics is the dominant theme of General Physics I. Motion is explored and described graphically using inquiry-based, real-time data collection with computer-based probes. This kinematic description of motion is then connected to a dynamic description through Newton�s laws and the forces causing the motion. Conservation laws, energy, momentum, collisions, and rotational motion are also considered. Material is explored using a student-centered, inquiry approach melding laboratory and more traditional approaches. Three longer activities emphasizing experimental design and data collection are undertaken across the semester in addition to the daily explorations. Mathematical prerequisites are high school algebra and trigonometry. The concepts of slope and area under the curve are used throughout the course, but formal calculus is not required. Three two-hour meetings per week.
STAFF MWF 08:15 AM-09:05 AM WILSN 300 4.0 LSCI
PHSC 0115 Choose One Lab - 0LA
20550
GENERAL PHYSICS I - LAB STAFF R 08:15 AM-11:05 AM WILSN 301 .0 LSCI
Lab - 0LB
21055
GENERAL PHYSICS I - LAB STAFF R 12:45 PM-03:35 PM WILSN 301 .0 LSCI
Communication
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
COMM 0101-002 (20078) INTRO TO MASS COMMUNICATION
COMM 0101 INTRODUCTION TO MASS COMMUNICATION (3)
Provides students with a comprehensive survey and critical analysis of mass communication. This is accomplished through the study of the history and structure of mass media industries and an examination of social, economic, political, cultural, and global factors that create the context in which media operate.
Nimkoff, M ONLINE 3.0 SOCU
COMM 0101-003 (20070) INTRO TO MASS COMMUNICATION
COMM 0101 INTRODUCTION TO MASS COMMUNICATION (3)
Provides students with a comprehensive survey and critical analysis of mass communication. This is accomplished through the study of the history and structure of mass media industries and an examination of social, economic, political, cultural, and global factors that create the context in which media operate.
STAFF TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM ELY 339 3.0 SOCU
COMM 0101-005 (20074) INTRO TO MASS COMMUNICATION
COMM 0101 INTRODUCTION TO MASS COMMUNICATION (3)
Provides students with a comprehensive survey and critical analysis of mass communication. This is accomplished through the study of the history and structure of mass media industries and an examination of social, economic, political, cultural, and global factors that create the context in which media operate.
Duran, D TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM ELY 338 3.0 SOCU
COMM 0101-006 (20077) INTRO TO MASS COMMUNICATION
COMM 0101 INTRODUCTION TO MASS COMMUNICATION (3)
Provides students with a comprehensive survey and critical analysis of mass communication. This is accomplished through the study of the history and structure of mass media industries and an examination of social, economic, political, cultural, and global factors that create the context in which media operate.
Duran, D ONLINE 3.0 SOCU
COMM 0101-007 (20939) INTRO TO MASS COMMUNICATION
COMM 0101 INTRODUCTION TO MASS COMMUNICATION (3)
Provides students with a comprehensive survey and critical analysis of mass communication. This is accomplished through the study of the history and structure of mass media industries and an examination of social, economic, political, cultural, and global factors that create the context in which media operate.
STAFF ONLINE 3.0 SOCU
COMM 0101-H01 (20068) HNRS: INTRO TO MASS COMMUNICAT
COMM 0101 INTRODUCTION TO MASS COMMUNICATION (3)
Provides students with a comprehensive survey and critical analysis of mass communication. This is accomplished through the study of the history and structure of mass media industries and an examination of social, economic, political, cultural, and global factors that create the context in which media operate.
Kang, S MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM ELY 313 3.0 SOCU
COMM 0102-002 (20081) INTRO TO HUMAN COMM
COMM 0102 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN COMMUNICATION (3)
Provides students with a survey of the field of human communication. Students will explore the symbolic nature of both verbal and nonverbal communication in several contexts including dyadic, small group, intercultural and organizational settings. Within and across contexts, students will study fundamental communication processes such as message construction, listening, persuasion, deception, and relationship development.
Cahill, M R 02:15 PM-03:30 PM
T 02:15 PM-03:30 PM
Hybrid
REMSYC
ELY 327
3.0
COMM 0106-001 (20738) VIDEO PRODUCTION I
COMM 0106 VIDEO PRODUCTION I (3)
Offers an introduction to the basics of video production and�nonlinear editing. Topics include camera technology and operation, sound, lighting, graphics, and editing, as well as fundamental aesthetic principles. Experience in planning, shooting, and editing video projects will be provided through hands-on exercise and projects in both studio and field environments.
Preston, E TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM ELY 327 3.0
COMM 0201-001 (20093) INTRO TO COMM TECH
COMM 0201 INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY (3)
Offers an introduction to the presentation tools needed by communication specialists. Students will learn how to use a variety of media to effectively communicate ideas. They will consider the aesthetic dimensions as well as the production aspects of a number of media formats. Those formats will include speech, text, audio, video, the web, and presentation software.
PR Kang, S MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM ELY 313 3.0
COMM 0201-002 (20094) INTRO TO COMM TECH
COMM 0201 INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY (3)
Offers an introduction to the presentation tools needed by communication specialists. Students will learn how to use a variety of media to effectively communicate ideas. They will consider the aesthetic dimensions as well as the production aspects of a number of media formats. Those formats will include speech, text, audio, video, the web, and presentation software.
PR Kang, S MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM ELY 313 3.0
COMM 0202-001 (21023) INTRO TO PHOTOGRAPHY
COMM 0202 INTRODUCTION TO PHOTOGRAPHY (3)
Examines techniques and applications of photography. Areas of study include camera operation, film selection, lenses, filters, lighting, composition, and digital monochrome and color image processing and manipulation (currently Adobe Photoshop). The history of the medium and its communicative properties also are discussed.
STAFF MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM ELY 338 3.0
COMM 0203-001 (20095) PRIN OF PUBLIC RELATIONS
COMM 0203 PRINCIPLES OF PUBLIC RELATIONS (3)
Examines the principles and processes of public relations. Areas of discussion include organizational aspects, the public relations environment, fact finding, planning and programming, implementation, evaluation and audience analysis.
Acquah, S TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM ELY 341 3.0
COMM 0204-001 (20096) WRITING FOR THE MEDIA
COMM 0204 WRITING FOR THE MEDIA (3)
Explores a variety of writing modes used in mass communication. Emphasis is on developing and refining the student�s writing skills. Students will be introduced to writing techniques used in newspapers, radio, television, magazines, advertising and public relations. This course is a prerequisite for all other COMM writing courses.
PR Zhang, Y W
M 01:40 PM-02:55 PM
Hybrid
ONLINE
ELY 339
3.0
COMM 0204-002 (20097) WRITING FOR THE MEDIA
COMM 0204 WRITING FOR THE MEDIA (3)
Explores a variety of writing modes used in mass communication. Emphasis is on developing and refining the student�s writing skills. Students will be introduced to writing techniques used in newspapers, radio, television, magazines, advertising and public relations. This course is a prerequisite for all other COMM writing courses.
PR Zhang, Y W
M 03:10 PM-04:25 PM
Hybrid
ONLINE
ELY 339
3.0
COMM 0206-001 (21017) VIDEO PRODUCTION II
COMM 0206 VIDEO PRODUCTION II (3)
An intensive hands-on, process-oriented workshop that allows students to further explore creative and aesthetic styles and refine their conceptual and technical video production skills. Through a series of exercises and assignments, students will produce and create a variety of short video projects intended to assist them in developing video portfolios (reels) of their work.
PR Preston, E TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM ELY 327 3.0
COMM 0207-001 (20098) COMMUNICATION ETHICS
COMM 0207 COMMUNICATION ETHICS (3)
Examines the process of ethical decision making in the context of communication. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of values and study of ethical principles representing several schools of philosophical thought. Values and principles are then applied to case studies of ethical dilemmas in various communication fields.
PR Nimkoff, M T
R 09:45 AM-11:00 AM
Hybrid
ONLINE
ELY 341
3.0
COMM 0207-002 (20736) COMMUNICATION ETHICS
COMM 0207 COMMUNICATION ETHICS (3)
Examines the process of ethical decision making in the context of communication. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of values and study of ethical principles representing several schools of philosophical thought. Values and principles are then applied to case studies of ethical dilemmas in various communication fields.
PR Nimkoff, M R 11:15 AM-12:30 PM
T
Hybrid
ELY 339
ONLINE
3.0
COMM 0209-001 (21104) GLOBAL COMMUNICATION
COMM 0209 GLOBAL COMMUNICATION (3)
Introduces students to various forms of communication in diverse settings around the world. Students will explore aspects of nationality, politics, ethnicity, religion, gender, sexuality, conflict, and culture. Students will examine how global communication often engenders stereotypes that reflect cultural beliefs and values. Areas for study may include: Africa, Asia, the Middle East, Europe, Oceania, North America, and Latin America.
PR STAFF W 03:10 PM-04:25 PM
Hybrid
REMSYC 3.0
COMM 0212-001 (21105) FILM AND GENDER
COMM 0212 FILM AND GENDER (3)
Examines the construction and portrayal of gender in film. In addition to surveying some of the predominant cinematic images of gender, students will be introduced to the precepts of contemporary feminist film criticism and gender studies.
STAFF T 03:45 PM-05:45 PM
TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM
ELY 338
ELY
3.0 UDIV
COMM 0216-001 (20112) ISSUES IN ADVERTISING
COMM 0216 ISSUES IN ADVERTISING (1-3)
Explores a range of critical perspectives on advertising and consumer culture. Topics may include cultural codes in advertising, advertising and children, and global advertising.
PR Preston, E F
MW 11:30 AM-12:20 PM
Hybrid
ONLINE
ELY 346
3.0
COMM 0221-001 (20113) COMMUNICATION THEORY
COMM 0221 COMMUNICATION THEORY (3)
Explores a variety of perspectives from which communication may be studied. Examines different models that have been developed to conceptualize, describe, and explain the communication process. Through class discussion, reading and research, students will analyze the assumptions underlying various communication theories and examine the strengths and weaknesses of these theories. Areas of study include the social and historical context of theory development, interpersonal communication, communication in organizations, and the impact of mass communication.
PR Duran, D TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM ELY 338 3.0
COMM 0222-001 (21018) INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION
COMM 0222 INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION (3)
Provides knowledge and understanding of the interrelationships among culture, language, and communication. Students will develop skills to overcome intercultural communication barriers such as ethnocentrism, misinterpretation of verbal and nonverbal signals, problems of stereotypes/perceptions and assumptions of similarities. The course will help students become culturally competent communicators in intercultural situations.
Acquah, S ONLINE 3.0 GDIV
COMM 0223-001 (21020) WEB PAGE DESIGN AND CONSTR. I
COMM 0223 WEB PAGE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION I (3)
Provides training in web page production from basic HTML to the use of sophisticated development technologies. Students will learn how the web works, develop skills in design and aesthetics, and gain fundamental mastery of web production software and basic skills in photo editing software. At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to build and manage their own and others' web sites.
Kang, S MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM ELY 313 3.0
COMM 0245-001 (21019) THE SILENT FILM
COMM 0245 THE SILENT FILM (4)
Explores the silent film from its birth in 1895 to its demise around 1930. Students will discover how film techniques and convention that are still in use today were established through experiment and accident during the silent era. The contributions of theater, art, and music to the development of film will be explored. The implications of film as the first modern mass medium will be discussed as students trace the impact of silent films on current cinema and the explosion of celebrity culture. Students will analyze both film form and content with particular attention to the contexts in which silent films were made. Films from Germany, France, and the Soviet union will be included along with those made in Great Britain, and the United States. The course includes lab time each week for watching and analyzing films.
Cahill, M W 01:40 PM-02:55 PM
M 01:40 PM-05:10 PM
Hybrid
REMSYC
ELY 348
4.0 AAPP
COMM 0275-001 (21022) JOURNALISM I
COMM 0275 JOURNALISM I (3)
An introduction to the technique of writing basic news stories. Students will also learn the basics of libel law and consider ethical issues that arise in the practice of journalism. Included is an examination of newsroom duties and responsibilities.
PR STAFF ONLINE 3.0
COMM 0305-001 (20872) COMMUNICATION INTERNSHIP
COMM 0305 COMMUNICATION INTERNSHIP (3-15)
Students, with prior approval of the department, intern at local, regional, or national communication sites. A portfolio of work completed at the internship site is required as part of the student�s final report.
STAFF
COMM 0307-001 (20114) COMMUNICATION LAW
COMM 0307 COMMUNICATION LAW (3)
Examines the principles and applications of communication law. Students will be introduced to fundamentals of the American legal system and legal case studies pertinent to the mass media and related communication technologies. Particular emphasis will be placed on such issues as freedom of expression, defamation, privacy, intellectual property, information access, censorship, commercial speech, and government regulation.
PR Gardner, T TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM ELY 339 3.0
COMM 0308-001 (20322) MULTIMEDIA JOURNALISM
COMM 0308 MULTIMEDIA JOURNALISM (3)
Introduces the skills necessary for reporting and writing in multiple media formats. Students will learn how to put together stories for the Web with video, audio, and graphics as well as text. Using simple hardware and related software, they will be introduced to the technical side of recording, taping, and editing for online presentation.
PR Zhang, Y T 02:15 PM-03:30 PM
R
Hybrid
ELY 313
ONLINE
3.0
COMM 0317-001 (20529) HEALTH COMMUNICATION
COMM 0317 HEALTH COMMUNICATION (3)
The interdisciplinary course will explore Health Communication theories and concepts. It would include topics such as medical interactions (patient-provider communication), health promotion campaigns, health literacy, and narrative medicine. The course will also comprise civic or experiential learning initiatives where students will collaborate with relevant community partners on various health or public health issues. Learning outcomes include students' ability to examine the relevant theories and models that shape health communication discourse; critically examine how social, political, and economic structures impact health; identify and understand the concepts of health literacy;�examine the nature of medical communication; review the role of narative medicine in health communication; demonstrate proficiency in planning, implementing, and evaluating a health communication program.�
Acquah, S T 02:15 PM-03:30 PM
R
Hybrid
ELY 341
ONLINE
3.0
COMM 0320-002 (20115) FOUND-COMM RESEARCH
COMM 0320 FOUNDATIONS OF COMMUNICATION RESEARCH (3)
Explores basic qualitative and quantitative methodologies of communication research, including experiments, surveys, focus groups, field observations, and content analysis. These methodologies are examined as ways of posing questions and solving problems in communication. Each student will write a paper based on a research project including problems definition, literature review, data gathering and analysis.
PR Preston, E F
MW 09:20 AM-11:00 AM
Hybrid
ONLINE
ELY 346
3.0
COMM 0321-001 (21021) POLITICAL COMMUNICATION
COMM 0321 POLITICAL COMMUNICATION (3)
Combines theory, research, and practical experience in order to gain an understanding of the role of mass communication in the electoral process. The course is intended to increase awareness of the problems and responsibilities involved in political and campaign communication, and to provide opportunities to apply political, organizational and communication skills. May be offered in conjunction with the Political Science Department.
PR Gardner, T R
T 02:15 PM-03:30 PM
Hybrid
ONLINE
ELY 339
3.0
COMM 0332-001 (20737) WRITING FOR INTERACTIVE MEDIA
COMM 0332 WRITING FOR THE INTERACTIVE MEDIA (3)
Offers training in writing for media across multiple platforms and genres, including websites, blogs, micro-blogs, television, and online audio formats including podcasts. Concentrates on the theory and practice of writing and publishing within convergent media environments, focusing on key characteristics of digital communication including intertexuality, interactivity and multimedia engagement.
PR Nimkoff, M MW 03:10 PM-04:25 PM ELY 346 3.0
COMM 0336-001 (20116) ADVANCED PUBLIC RELATIONS
COMM 0336 ADVANCED PUBLIC RELATIONS (3)
Focuses on the public relations practitioner as communications manager, emphasizing the counseling function of PR in formulating strategies and policies in corporate communications.
PR STAFF TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM ELY 346 3.0
COMM 0339-001 (20553) JOURNALISM AND SOCIETY
COMM 0339 JOURNALISM AND SOCIETY (3)
Explores contemporary issues in journalism with an emphasis on social and cultural factors. Brings a historical, ethical and comparative lens to discussion of journalisitc values, technological developments, legal issues, and the impact of journalism on society.
Zhang, Y T 12:45 PM-02:00 PM
R
Hybrid
ELY 313
ONLINE
3.0
COMM 0342-001 (20117) PUBLIC RELATIONS WRITING
COMM 0342 PUBLIC RELATIONS WRITING (3)
Covers public relations planning, audience analysis, and construction of motivational messages. Students will work on a variety of assignments that emphasize the design and production of effective public relations material for press, publications, and electronic media.
PR Acquah, S ONLINE 3.0
COMM 0399-001 (21563) IS: ADVANCED FILM/VIDEO EDITIN
COMM 0399 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3)
Independent study of topics in communication.
Kang, S
Computer and Information Sci.
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
CAIS 0101-002 (20168) COMPUTERS IN SOCIETY
CAIS 0101 COMPUTERS IN SOCIETY (3)
An introduction to the nature and function of computers, with emphasis on the social, intellectual, legal and ethical issues involved with their use in contemporary society. Includes a survey of computing technology to the extent necessary to enable the student to identify, understand and evaluate computer-related issues such as privacy and databases, data matching, automation and dehumanization, worker displacement and computer security, fraud and evolving moral and legal concerns associated with modern technological society.
STAFF TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM WILSN 101 3.0 SOCU
CAIS 0102-001 (20815) COMP SCI PRINCIPLES
CAIS 0102 COMPUTER SCIENCE PRINCIPLES (3)
Provides an overview of the fundamental principles of computer science. Topics covered include data representation, storage and manipulation techniques; an introduction to computer architectures and operations; an investigation of useful data structures; and a review of file organization and database models. The development and analysis of elementary algorithms, employing modular design programming language techniques, are used to demonstrate a number of the course concepts.
Boughosn, S MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM WILSN 407 3.0
CAIS 0102-002 (20169) COMP SCI PRINCIPLES
CAIS 0102 COMPUTER SCIENCE PRINCIPLES (3)
Provides an overview of the fundamental principles of computer science. Topics covered include data representation, storage and manipulation techniques; an introduction to computer architectures and operations; an investigation of useful data structures; and a review of file organization and database models. The development and analysis of elementary algorithms, employing modular design programming language techniques, are used to demonstrate a number of the course concepts.
Boughosn, S MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM WILSN 407 3.0
CAIS 0105-001 (21035) INTRODUCTION TO DATA SCIENCE
CAIS 0105 INTRODUCTION TO DATA SCIENCE (3)
This course teachers basic concepts and techniques of data science such as correlation, regression, null-hypothesis testing, and Bayesian inference. The course is part of a trend in data science education towards emphasizing conceptual understanding rather than computational fluency. The course emphasizes the importance of problem driven approach. Statistics software such as R and Python will be used to perform tests on large data sets.
Yang, M TR 03:45 PM-05:00 PM WILSN 407 3.0
CAIS 0117-001 (20170) INTRO COMPUTER PROGRAMMING
CAIS 0117 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER PROGRAMMING (3)
This course introduces the fundamental principles of computer programming by exploring the syntax and semantics of a procedural programming language.� Topics include control structures, iterators, and fundamental data structures.� Problem-solving is the primary emphasis.� Strategies and techniques, along with common, elementary algorithms are explored and applied to the solution of a variety of problem types.� No previous programming experience is required.
Yang, M MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM BATES 03 3.0 ARSN
CAIS 0220-001 (20172) COMPUTER SCIENCE/PROG. DESN II
CAIS 0220 COMPUTER SCIENCE/PROGRAM DESIGN II (4)
An advanced course in computer science and program design for computer science and computer information system majors. A current high-level object-oriented programming language, including concentrated use of its API (Application Programming Interface), is explored. Topics include in depth object-oriented software design techniques, highly developed graphical user interfaces, advanced I/O, recursion, concurrent programming, error processing, and networking. Extensive programming, utilizing a sophisticated integrated development environment, is required of students.
PR Kurniawati, R MW 01:29 PM-03:09 PM WILSN 407 4.0
CAIS 0265-002 (20177) INTRO:MICROPROCESSORS
CAIS 0265 INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL ELECTRONICS AND MICROPROCESSORS (4)
Provides a survey of digital electronics and microprocessors. Initial topics to be covered include logic gates, Boolean Algebra, simplification, logic circuits, flip-flops, shift registers, counters and memory systems, which will be followed by an examination of architectures, instruction sets and applications on microprocessors and microcomputers. Emphasis will be on computer hardware at the chip level. Software content will include the use of an assembly language to control a microprocessor that interfaces to other electronic components. Laboratory sessions will allow students to build and design simple circuits to reinforce lecture concepts.
PR Chung, G T 12:45 PM-02:25 PM
TR 08:15 AM-09:30 AM
WILSN 101
WILSN 407
4.0
CAIS 0305-001 (20178) ELEMENTS OF SYSTEMS PROGRAM.
CAIS 0305 ELEMENTS OF SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING (3)
An introduction to a modern operating system used for systems programming (such as UNIX) and its utilities. Topics representative of those which might be chosen by the instructor as application endeavors include design of a small compiler/interpreter using compiler generating tools, network utilities using TCP/IP or other appropriate protocols, graphics utilities using systems such as X Windows, or device drivers.
PR Chung, G TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM WILSN 407 3.0
CAIS 0307-001 (20179) ORGANIZ. OF PROGRAMMING LANG
CAIS 0307 ORGANIZATION OF PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES (3)
A study of computer programming languages from the following points of view: specification, programming paradigms, implementation, and actual performance. Some laboratory exercises for the various languages will be given as resources permit. The languages will be chosen by the instructor.
PR Boughosn, S MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM WILSN 101 3.0
CAIS 0316-001 (21011) WEB PROGRAMMING
CAIS 0316 WEB PROGRAMMING (3)
An introduction to server-side and client-side Web Programming. One or more popular Web scripting languages will be used to write programs intended to run under a Web browser. Applications of client-side programming and the security issues involved will be explored. The use of one or more languages intended to run on a web server will be illustrated with applications such as remote database access, forms-based systems for e-business and information gathering, and personalized Web pages. Students will be expected to write significant Web applications using both client-side and server-side programming techniques.
PR Kurniawati, R F 11:30 AM-12:20 PM
MW 11:30 AM-12:20 PM
Hybrid
REMSYC
WILSN 407
3.0
CAIS 0347-001 (20726) INTRO TO NETWORKING
CAIS 0347 INTRODUCTION TO NETWORKING (3)
Communications hardware, including network connectors, routers, and wireless communications are discussed. LANs/WANs and network topologies are discussed. Hardware-based network protocols (such as Ethernet) and high-level protocols, such as the TCP/IP suite are surveyed.
PR Kurniawati, R MW 03:15 PM-04:30 PM WILSN 407 3.0
CAIS 0351-001 (20180) INTRO TO THEORY OF COMPUTATION
CAIS 0351 INTRODUCTION TO THE THEORY OF COMPUTATION (3)
Presentation of topics of current theoretical interest in computer science chosen from among grammars, finite automata, Turing machines, cellular automata and other models of computers; computability theory; and computational complexity.
PR Yang, M MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM BATES 03 3.0
Criminal Justice
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
CRJU 0101-004 (20107) INTRO TO CRIM JUSTICE
CRJU 0101 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)
A survey of the American Criminal Justice System as a socio-political institution. The police, criminal courts, and correctional and rehabilitative endeavors will be analyzed within the framework of empirical research from the perspectives of the social sciences. Required of all first-year students in the Criminal Justice major.
Jones, J ONLINE 3.0 SOCU
CRJU 0101-H01 (20066) HNRS:INTRO TO CRIM JUSTICE
CRJU 0101 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)
A survey of the American Criminal Justice System as a socio-political institution. The police, criminal courts, and correctional and rehabilitative endeavors will be analyzed within the framework of empirical research from the perspectives of the social sciences. Required of all first-year students in the Criminal Justice major.
Cho, B TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM HMC 02 3.0 SOCU
CRJU 0201-001 (20104) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND SOCIETY
CRJU 0201 LAW ENFORCEMENT AND SOCIETY (3)
The structure and function of law enforcement agencies in contemporary society will be analyzed in their sociological context. Particular emphasis will be placed on the role of the police within the framework of the Criminal Justice System.
PR Foyle, M TR 03:45 PM-05:00 PM HMC 04 3.0
CRJU 0201-002 (20109) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND SOCIETY
CRJU 0201 LAW ENFORCEMENT AND SOCIETY (3)
The structure and function of law enforcement agencies in contemporary society will be analyzed in their sociological context. Particular emphasis will be placed on the role of the police within the framework of the Criminal Justice System.
PR Barao, L MWF 08:15 AM-09:05 AM HMC 04 3.0
CRJU 0201-003 (20272) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND SOCIETY
CRJU 0201 LAW ENFORCEMENT AND SOCIETY (3)
The structure and function of law enforcement agencies in contemporary society will be analyzed in their sociological context. Particular emphasis will be placed on the role of the police within the framework of the Criminal Justice System.
PR Barao, L MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM HMC 04 3.0
CRJU 0201-004 (20358) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND SOCIETY
CRJU 0201 LAW ENFORCEMENT AND SOCIETY (3)
The structure and function of law enforcement agencies in contemporary society will be analyzed in their sociological context. Particular emphasis will be placed on the role of the police within the framework of the Criminal Justice System.
PR Kaselouskas, S R 04:00 PM-06:30 PM HMC 03 3.0
CRJU 0201-005 (20359) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND SOCIETY
CRJU 0201 LAW ENFORCEMENT AND SOCIETY (3)
The structure and function of law enforcement agencies in contemporary society will be analyzed in their sociological context. Particular emphasis will be placed on the role of the police within the framework of the Criminal Justice System.
PR McCabe, M W 04:00 PM-06:30 PM HMC 03 3.0
CRJU 0205-001 (20271) AMER JUDICIAL SYSTEMS
CRJU 0205 AMERICAN JUDICIAL SYSTEM (3)
An examination of the development of law and the American legal system. The problems related to the meaning and uses of law; the organizational hierarchy of the courts; and the role of the courts in the criminal justice system.
PR Perry, A TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM HMC 03 3.0
CRJU 0205-002 (20277) AMER JUDICIAL SYSTEMS
CRJU 0205 AMERICAN JUDICIAL SYSTEM (3)
An examination of the development of law and the American legal system. The problems related to the meaning and uses of law; the organizational hierarchy of the courts; and the role of the courts in the criminal justice system.
PR Perry, A TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM HMC 03 3.0
CRJU 0205-003 (20105) AMER JUDICIAL SYSTEMS
CRJU 0205 AMERICAN JUDICIAL SYSTEM (3)
An examination of the development of law and the American legal system. The problems related to the meaning and uses of law; the organizational hierarchy of the courts; and the role of the courts in the criminal justice system.
PR Dallam-Murphy, A MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM HMC 03 3.0
CRJU 0205-004 (20108) AMER JUDICIAL SYSTEMS
CRJU 0205 AMERICAN JUDICIAL SYSTEM (3)
An examination of the development of law and the American legal system. The problems related to the meaning and uses of law; the organizational hierarchy of the courts; and the role of the courts in the criminal justice system.
PR Dallam-Murphy, A MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM HMC 03 3.0
CRJU 0205-005 (20106) AMER JUDICIAL SYSTEMS
CRJU 0205 AMERICAN JUDICIAL SYSTEM (3)
An examination of the development of law and the American legal system. The problems related to the meaning and uses of law; the organizational hierarchy of the courts; and the role of the courts in the criminal justice system.
PR Nixon, T TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM HMC 02 3.0
CRJU 0205-006 (20253) AMER JUDICIAL SYSTEMS
CRJU 0205 AMERICAN JUDICIAL SYSTEM (3)
An examination of the development of law and the American legal system. The problems related to the meaning and uses of law; the organizational hierarchy of the courts; and the role of the courts in the criminal justice system.
PR Nixon, T TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM HMC 02 3.0
CRJU 0301-001 (20634) JUVENILE PROCEDURE
CRJU 0301 JUVENILE PROCEDURE (3)
An examination of the underlying philosophy of juvenile justice and procedures used to process a juvenile alleged to be delinquent through the juvenile justice system. The course will focus on the differences between juvenile procedure and adult criminal procedure by examining recent court decisions and statutory law pertaining to juveniles.
PR Williams, H MWF 08:15 AM-09:05 AM HMC 01 3.0
CRJU 0302-002 (20486) CRIMINAL LAW
CRJU 0302 CRIMINAL LAW (3)
The function of criminal law and its relationship to various criminal offenses, including crimes against persons and crimes against property.
PR Perry, A TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM HMC 03 3.0
CRJU 0307-001 (20266) CONTEMP PROB IN LAW ENFORCE.
CRJU 0307 CONTEMPORARY PROBLEMS IN LAW ENFORCEMENT (3)
An intensive analysis of selected problems in American law enforcement and police-community relations. A major research paper is required.
PR Rizzo, B ONLINE 3.0
CRJU 0307-002 (20489) CONTEMP PROB IN LAW ENFORCE.
CRJU 0307 CONTEMPORARY PROBLEMS IN LAW ENFORCEMENT (3)
An intensive analysis of selected problems in American law enforcement and police-community relations. A major research paper is required.
PR Rizzo, B ONLINE 3.0
CRJU 0310-001 (20533) ORGANIZED AND WHITE COLLAR
CRJU 0310 ORGANIZED AND WHITE COLLAR CRIME (3)
The methods through which organized crime influences and, in many instances, controls entire communities. Traditional types of crime heavily influenced by organized crime, such as loan sharking and gambling, will be analyzed in an effort to demonstrate the basis of power and wealth of organized crime in the United States.
PR Michael, G M 01:40 PM-04:10 PM HMC 01 3.0
CRJU 0310-003 (20534) ORGANIZED AND WHITE COLLAR
CRJU 0310 ORGANIZED AND WHITE COLLAR CRIME (3)
The methods through which organized crime influences and, in many instances, controls entire communities. Traditional types of crime heavily influenced by organized crime, such as loan sharking and gambling, will be analyzed in an effort to demonstrate the basis of power and wealth of organized crime in the United States.
PR Michael, G W 01:40 PM-04:10 PM HMC 01 3.0
CRJU 0312-001 (20490) WOMEN IN THE CRIM JUST SYSTEM
CRJU 0312 WOMEN IN THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM (3)
An examination of the female and her often unique involvement in the American criminal justice system, whether as an offender, as a victim, or as an employee in policing, the courts, or in corrections. Traditional as well as feminist theories will be critically evaluated, using both historical analysis and more recent studies. Throughout, the focus is on the detection and understanding of differences and similarities in gender attitudes and behaviors, as well as institutional factors effecting change.
PR Stassinos, E TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM WILSN 300 3.0 UDIV
CRJU 0312-002 (20485) WOMEN IN THE CRIM JUST SYSTEM
CRJU 0312 WOMEN IN THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM (3)
An examination of the female and her often unique involvement in the American criminal justice system, whether as an offender, as a victim, or as an employee in policing, the courts, or in corrections. Traditional as well as feminist theories will be critically evaluated, using both historical analysis and more recent studies. Throughout, the focus is on the detection and understanding of differences and similarities in gender attitudes and behaviors, as well as institutional factors effecting change.
PR Stassinos, E TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 316 3.0 UDIV
CRJU 0313-001 (20487) STATISTICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE
CRJU 0313 STATISTICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)
Examines the relationship and application of statistical techniques to theory building and concept construction.� Gives an overview of statistical methods and their appropriateness for research in criminal justice.� In addition, various computer-oriented analytical tools and data processing systems available to the criminal justice practitioner will be surveyed.
PR Nixon, T TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM HMC PC 3.0 ARSN
CRJU 0313-002 (20488) STATISTICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE
CRJU 0313 STATISTICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3)
Examines the relationship and application of statistical techniques to theory building and concept construction.� Gives an overview of statistical methods and their appropriateness for research in criminal justice.� In addition, various computer-oriented analytical tools and data processing systems available to the criminal justice practitioner will be surveyed.
PR Nixon, T TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM HMC PC 3.0 ARSN
CRJU 0318-001 (21296) THEORY AND PRAC OF MAND REPORT
CRJU 0318 THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF MANDATED REPORTING (3)
This course outlines the specific responsibilities of mandated reporters; those who are required by law to report suspected abuse and/or neglect of children, the elderly, and persons with disabilities.� This course will review the theoretical explanations for these behaviors and the dynamics of their occurrences suggested by the research literature.� It also involves explanations of different wound categories that suggest abuse and/or neglect.� There will be guidance and practice in the development of an accurate and professional reporting format.
Dallam-Murphy, A MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM HMC 03 3.0
CRJU 0327-001 (21114) RACE,ETHNCTY in CRIM. JUST SYS
CRJU 0327 RACE AND ETHNICITY IN THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM (3)
An examination of the issues of race and ethnicity which continue to affect all aspects of criminal justice in America. Whether as offenders, victims, or as persons working (or seeking to work) within 'the system,' African Americans, Hispanics, and other minorities are treated differently than non-minorities. This course explores the core concepts of race and ethnicity as they have developed in our culture, and examines racism, discrimination, and disparities in key institutions of the criminal justice system. The affects of these issues on communities of color and potential remedies for them are also discussed.
PR Tobin, K MW 09:20 AM-10:10 AM
Hybrid
HMC 02 3.0 UDIV
CRJU 0327-002 (21115) RACE,ETHNCTY in CRIM. JUST SYS
CRJU 0327 RACE AND ETHNICITY IN THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM (3)
An examination of the issues of race and ethnicity which continue to affect all aspects of criminal justice in America. Whether as offenders, victims, or as persons working (or seeking to work) within 'the system,' African Americans, Hispanics, and other minorities are treated differently than non-minorities. This course explores the core concepts of race and ethnicity as they have developed in our culture, and examines racism, discrimination, and disparities in key institutions of the criminal justice system. The affects of these issues on communities of color and potential remedies for them are also discussed.
PR Tobin, K MW 10:25 AM-11:15 AM
Hybrid
HMC 02 3.0 UDIV
CRJU 0328-001 (20536) COMPUTER APPL. IN CRIME ANALY.
CRJU 0328 COMPUTER APPLICATION IN CRIME ANALYSIS (3)
This course is designed to examine developments in information systems and their applications in the crime analysis environment. Particular attention will be given to management and analysis of crime-related data as well as an assessment of current and future applications in crime analysis. Previous computer experience is not required.
PR Jones, J R 12:45 PM-02:00 PM
Hybrid
WILSN 202A 3.0
CRJU 0341-001 (20638) ST: LAW ENFORCEMENT TECHNOLOGY PR Barao, L MW 11:30 AM-12:20 PM
Hybrid
HMC 02 3.0
CRJU 0341-002 (21112) ST: LAW ENFORCEMENT TECHNOLOGY PR Barao, L MW 12:35 PM-01:25 PM
Hybrid
HMC 02 3.0
CRJU 0342-001 (20639) ST: SPORTS AND CRIMINAL BEHAVI PR Kudlac, C TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM HMC 01 3.0
CRJU 0342-002 (20640) ST: SPORTS AND CRIMINAL BEHAVI PR Kudlac, C TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM HMC 01 3.0
CRJU 0354-001 (21110) EVALUATING CRIMINAL OFFENDERS
CRJU 0354 EVALUATING CRIMINAL OFFENDERS (3)
An overview of techniques to understand and categorize criminal offenders so as to employ the appropriate criminal justice response. The course will examine how offenders are evaluated at critical junctures of the corrections system, including bail release decisions, eligibility for pretrial programs, sentencing, and classifications in prison, probation, and parole. Current methods used by the justice system, including the persistence investigation (PSI), sentencing guidelines, and structured risk and needs assessment will be reviewed. This course will also review the more clinical or psychodynamic assessment methods used with special offender populations (drugs/alcohol offenders, violent offenders, sex offenders).
PR Roscoe, T TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM HMC 04 3.0
CRJU 0354-002 (21111) EVALUATING CRIMINAL OFFENDERS
CRJU 0354 EVALUATING CRIMINAL OFFENDERS (3)
An overview of techniques to understand and categorize criminal offenders so as to employ the appropriate criminal justice response. The course will examine how offenders are evaluated at critical junctures of the corrections system, including bail release decisions, eligibility for pretrial programs, sentencing, and classifications in prison, probation, and parole. Current methods used by the justice system, including the persistence investigation (PSI), sentencing guidelines, and structured risk and needs assessment will be reviewed. This course will also review the more clinical or psychodynamic assessment methods used with special offender populations (drugs/alcohol offenders, violent offenders, sex offenders).
PR Roscoe, T TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM HMC 04 3.0
CRJU 0355-001 (20065) HIGH PROFILE CRIMES AND TRIALS
CRJU 0355 HIGH PROFILE CRIMES AND TRIALS (3)
A survey of high profile crimes and trials from different periods in history. The importance of the media in creating high profile crimes and trials will be discussed along with the notation of newsworthiness. Particular attention will be given to the effects high profile crimes and trials have on the public and criminal justice system.
PR Kudlac, C ONLINE 3.0
CRJU 0358-001 (20267) SANCTIONING SEXUAL OFFENDERS
CRJU 0358 SANCTIONING SEXUAL OFFENDERS (3)
This course will critically evaluate policies directed toward sex offenders, such as those requiring registration and notification, those that restrict where sex offenders may live, and those that allow for civil commitment of sex offenders after they have served their sentence for a sex crime.� These policies will be evaluated based on current understandings of why people sexually offend, and the types of strategies that offer the most promise for a safe and healthy community.� Consideration will be given to the goals of rehabilitation and reintegration, how they may be compromised, to society's detriment, given the current strong emphasis on the competing goals of retribution, deterrence, and incapacitation in dealing with sexual offenders in particular.
Roscoe, T W 01:40 PM-04:10 PM HMC 04 3.0
CRJU 0358-002 (20357) SANCTIONING SEXUAL OFFENDERS
CRJU 0358 SANCTIONING SEXUAL OFFENDERS (3)
This course will critically evaluate policies directed toward sex offenders, such as those requiring registration and notification, those that restrict where sex offenders may live, and those that allow for civil commitment of sex offenders after they have served their sentence for a sex crime.� These policies will be evaluated based on current understandings of why people sexually offend, and the types of strategies that offer the most promise for a safe and healthy community.� Consideration will be given to the goals of rehabilitation and reintegration, how they may be compromised, to society's detriment, given the current strong emphasis on the competing goals of retribution, deterrence, and incapacitation in dealing with sexual offenders in particular.
Roscoe, T TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM HMC 04 3.0
CRJU 0397-001 (20641) WASHINGTON CENTER:CRIM. JUST. Dallam-Murphy, A
CRJU 0398-001 (20642) FIELD PRACTICUM IN CJ
CRJU 0398 FIELD PRACTICUM IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (3-6)
The field practicum class involves the student�s participation in the day-to-day functions of a criminal justice agency. The course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to translate the theoretically oriented classroom experience into practical application in an area of particular interest to the student.
Dallam-Murphy, A
Economics
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
ECON 0101-001 (21145) PRIN OF MACROECONOMICS
ECON 0101 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS (3)
An introduction to economic analysis with emphasis on the application of economic principles to an understanding of contemporary problems. Topics to be discussed include: the nature of a market economy, national income, employment and fiscal policy, characteristics of the American monetary and banking system, economic growth and international trade. ECON 0101 and ECON 0102 may be taken in any order.
Chuku, S ONLINE 3.0 SOCU
ECON 0101-002 (20398) PRIN OF MACROECONOMICS
ECON 0101 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS (3)
An introduction to economic analysis with emphasis on the application of economic principles to an understanding of contemporary problems. Topics to be discussed include: the nature of a market economy, national income, employment and fiscal policy, characteristics of the American monetary and banking system, economic growth and international trade. ECON 0101 and ECON 0102 may be taken in any order.
Chuku, S ONLINE 3.0 SOCU
ECON 0101-003 (20403) PRIN OF MACROECONOMICS
ECON 0101 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS (3)
An introduction to economic analysis with emphasis on the application of economic principles to an understanding of contemporary problems. Topics to be discussed include: the nature of a market economy, national income, employment and fiscal policy, characteristics of the American monetary and banking system, economic growth and international trade. ECON 0101 and ECON 0102 may be taken in any order.
Wagner, J MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM WILSN 400 3.0 SOCU
ECON 0101-004 (20409) PRIN OF MACROECONOMICS
ECON 0101 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS (3)
An introduction to economic analysis with emphasis on the application of economic principles to an understanding of contemporary problems. Topics to be discussed include: the nature of a market economy, national income, employment and fiscal policy, characteristics of the American monetary and banking system, economic growth and international trade. ECON 0101 and ECON 0102 may be taken in any order.
Wagner, J MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM WILSN 400 3.0 SOCU
ECON 0102-001 (21147) PRIN OF MICROECONOMICS
ECON 0102 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (3)
Emphasis on the economics of the firm and resource allocation. Topics to be discussed include: the price and output determination under pure competition, pure monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly, the resource market, international trade, and an evaluation of American capitalism. ECON 0101 and ECON 0102 may be taken in any order.
Sarnikar, S ONLINE 3.0 SOCU
ECON 0102-002 (20399) PRIN OF MICROECONOMICS
ECON 0102 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (3)
Emphasis on the economics of the firm and resource allocation. Topics to be discussed include: the price and output determination under pure competition, pure monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly, the resource market, international trade, and an evaluation of American capitalism. ECON 0101 and ECON 0102 may be taken in any order.
Sarnikar, S ONLINE 3.0 SOCU
ECON 0102-003 (20482) PRIN OF MICROECONOMICS
ECON 0102 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (3)
Emphasis on the economics of the firm and resource allocation. Topics to be discussed include: the price and output determination under pure competition, pure monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly, the resource market, international trade, and an evaluation of American capitalism. ECON 0101 and ECON 0102 may be taken in any order.
Sarnikar, S M 01:40 PM-02:55 PM
W 01:40 PM-02:55 PM
Hybrid
WILSN 400
REMSYC
3.0 SOCU
ECON 0102-004 (20410) PRIN OF MICROECONOMICS
ECON 0102 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (3)
Emphasis on the economics of the firm and resource allocation. Topics to be discussed include: the price and output determination under pure competition, pure monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly, the resource market, international trade, and an evaluation of American capitalism. ECON 0101 and ECON 0102 may be taken in any order.
Schlaffer, J TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM WILSN 401 3.0 SOCU
ECON 0102-005 (20756) PRIN OF MICROECONOMICS
ECON 0102 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (3)
Emphasis on the economics of the firm and resource allocation. Topics to be discussed include: the price and output determination under pure competition, pure monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly, the resource market, international trade, and an evaluation of American capitalism. ECON 0101 and ECON 0102 may be taken in any order.
Schlaffer, J TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM WILSN 401 3.0 SOCU
ECON 0201-001 (20373) MICROECONOMIC THEORY
ECON 0201 MICROECONOMIC THEORY (3)
An examination of the basic assumptions and methods of analysis employed in microeconomic theory. Topics studied include: elasticity concepts, demand derivation, production and cost relationships, pricing under various market structures, and distribution theory. These topics are integrated through short and long-run analysis as applied to the firm and industry. Lecture and exercises of concepts is included.
PR Sackett-Taylor, H TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM WILSN 401 3.0
ECON 0304-001 (21146) URBAN ECONOMICS
ECON 0304 URBAN ECONOMICS (3)
An economic analysis of contemporary urban issues. Topics include: rent control, minimum wage laws, racial and gender discrimination, illegal drugs, the regulation of public utilities, inequality with regard to income and wealth, and the economics of crime.
PR Wagner, J TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM WILSN 400 3.0 UDIV
ECON 0305-001 (20411) INTRO TO ECONOMETRIC METHODS
ECON 0305 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRIC METHODS (3)
A study of the application of statistical methods and techniques to economic conditions. The primary focus of the course is the formulation, interpretation, and critical analysis of regression methodology. Topics include: hypothesis testing, multiple regression, specification errors, multi-collinearity, and autocorrelation.
PR Chuku, S TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 407 3.0 ARSN
ECON 0314-001 (21149) INDUSTRIAL ORG.
ECON 0314 INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION (3)
An examination of the structure, conduct and performance of industries in the United States. Determinants of industrial organization, including economies of scale, mergers, vertical integration, advertising, pricing strategies and technology, are examined. Analysis of antitrust policy focusing on legal precedents regarding monopoly, price-fixing, mergers, and deceptive practices.
PR Schlaffer, J MWF 12:35 PM-01:25 PM WILSN 420 3.0
ECON 0351-001 (21371) ST: BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS
ECON 0351 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS (3)
Examines and analyzes contemporary topics in economics. Course content will vary according to the area of specialization of the instructor and the interests of the students. May be repeated if course content differs.
Sarnikar, S ONLINE 3.0
Education
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
EDUC 0201-001 (20111) LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT
EDUC 0201 LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT (3)
An introduction to the basic principles and practices of effective assessment for classroom teachers. The course addresses what teachers need to do to assess learning before, during, and after instruction with special emphasis given to the importance of personal judgment and educational accountability. Topics include selecting appropriate modes of assessment, assessment and issues of diversity, technology and assessment, standardized testing, assessment and programmatic change.
Bailey, E ONLINE 3.0
EDUC 0201-002 (21175) LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT
EDUC 0201 LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT (3)
An introduction to the basic principles and practices of effective assessment for classroom teachers. The course addresses what teachers need to do to assess learning before, during, and after instruction with special emphasis given to the importance of personal judgment and educational accountability. Topics include selecting appropriate modes of assessment, assessment and issues of diversity, technology and assessment, standardized testing, assessment and programmatic change.
Bailey, E ONLINE 3.0
EDUC 0215-001 (21179) THEORY CRTICAL MULTCLTRL EDUC
EDUC 0215 THEORY OF CRITICAL MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION (3)
This course provides a foundation in Critical Multicultural Education and Critical Race theories. Students are guided in reflecting on their personal identities and socialization to examine how social constructions of difference shape the perspectives, policies, and opportunities of different groups in the United States. The construction of difference includes, but is not limited to: race, class, religion, gender, ability status, and sexual orientation. This course explores the historical role that education plays in framing relationships between social groups and institutional power. Critical self reflection, historical contexts of oppression, and contemporary social justice issues are emphasized in this course to align with the department's commitment to Social Justice, Critical Engagement with Diversity, and�Reflective Practice.
Gleason, S TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM BATES 225 3.0
EDUC 0215-002 (21180) THEORY CRTICAL MULTCLTRL EDUC
EDUC 0215 THEORY OF CRITICAL MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION (3)
This course provides a foundation in Critical Multicultural Education and Critical Race theories. Students are guided in reflecting on their personal identities and socialization to examine how social constructions of difference shape the perspectives, policies, and opportunities of different groups in the United States. The construction of difference includes, but is not limited to: race, class, religion, gender, ability status, and sexual orientation. This course explores the historical role that education plays in framing relationships between social groups and institutional power. Critical self reflection, historical contexts of oppression, and contemporary social justice issues are emphasized in this course to align with the department's commitment to Social Justice, Critical Engagement with Diversity, and�Reflective Practice.
Gleason, S TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM BATES 125 3.0
EDUC 0215-003 (21181) THEORY CRTICAL MULTCLTRL EDUC
EDUC 0215 THEORY OF CRITICAL MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION (3)
This course provides a foundation in Critical Multicultural Education and Critical Race theories. Students are guided in reflecting on their personal identities and socialization to examine how social constructions of difference shape the perspectives, policies, and opportunities of different groups in the United States. The construction of difference includes, but is not limited to: race, class, religion, gender, ability status, and sexual orientation. This course explores the historical role that education plays in framing relationships between social groups and institutional power. Critical self reflection, historical contexts of oppression, and contemporary social justice issues are emphasized in this course to align with the department's commitment to Social Justice, Critical Engagement with Diversity, and�Reflective Practice.
Gleason, S T 04:30 PM-06:55 PM BATES 212 3.0
EDUC 0215-004 (21182) THEORY CRTICAL MULTCLTRL EDUC
EDUC 0215 THEORY OF CRITICAL MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION (3)
This course provides a foundation in Critical Multicultural Education and Critical Race theories. Students are guided in reflecting on their personal identities and socialization to examine how social constructions of difference shape the perspectives, policies, and opportunities of different groups in the United States. The construction of difference includes, but is not limited to: race, class, religion, gender, ability status, and sexual orientation. This course explores the historical role that education plays in framing relationships between social groups and institutional power. Critical self reflection, historical contexts of oppression, and contemporary social justice issues are emphasized in this course to align with the department's commitment to Social Justice, Critical Engagement with Diversity, and�Reflective Practice.
Hafner, A MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM BATES 126 3.0
EDUC 0215-005 (21183) THEORY CRTICAL MULTCLTRL EDUC
EDUC 0215 THEORY OF CRITICAL MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION (3)
This course provides a foundation in Critical Multicultural Education and Critical Race theories. Students are guided in reflecting on their personal identities and socialization to examine how social constructions of difference shape the perspectives, policies, and opportunities of different groups in the United States. The construction of difference includes, but is not limited to: race, class, religion, gender, ability status, and sexual orientation. This course explores the historical role that education plays in framing relationships between social groups and institutional power. Critical self reflection, historical contexts of oppression, and contemporary social justice issues are emphasized in this course to align with the department's commitment to Social Justice, Critical Engagement with Diversity, and�Reflective Practice.
Hafner, A MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM BATES 126 3.0
EDUC 0220-001 (20091) SCHOOL IN AMER.CULTURE
EDUC 0220 SCHOOLS IN AMERICAN CULTURE (3)
This course is designed to stimulate creative and critical thinking about the nature and value of education. Participants will be introduced to the role of the teachers, learners, and schools in society. The role of schools in maintaining and perpetuating culture will be considered as well as issues and controversies confronting American education. Students will also be familiarized with important global educational issues and developments. Field experience required for teacher licensure students.
Raker, D MWF 08:15 AM-09:05 AM BATES 221 3.0 SOCU
EDUC 0220-002 (20085) SCHOOL IN AMER.CULTURE
EDUC 0220 SCHOOLS IN AMERICAN CULTURE (3)
This course is designed to stimulate creative and critical thinking about the nature and value of education. Participants will be introduced to the role of the teachers, learners, and schools in society. The role of schools in maintaining and perpetuating culture will be considered as well as issues and controversies confronting American education. Students will also be familiarized with important global educational issues and developments. Field experience required for teacher licensure students.
Raker, D MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM BATES 221 3.0 SOCU
EDUC 0221-001 (20069) FOUNDATIONS OF SPECIAL EDUCATI
EDUC 0221 INTRODUCTION TO STUDENTS WITH EXCEPTIONAL LEARNING NEEDS (3)
This course will focus on students who meet the criteria for categories of disabilities that are identified by education law, as well as students with other exceptional learning needs.� An exploration of case studies of individuals in the context of schools will facilitate an understanding of laws, history, litigation, individualized education programs, Response to Intervention (RTI), and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principles.� Course participants will explore strategies for developing differentiated learning experiences that address learner variability while maintaining high expectations for all students.� Race, ethnicity, gender, and economic status are examined as they apply to students with exceptional learning needs.� Historical and current approaches to the education and inclusion of students with�exceptional learning needs will be considered, including topics of identification, referral, evaluation, placement, and the use of assistive technologies.� A 15-hour field experience is required.
McLeod, T TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM BATES 126 3.0
EDUC 0221-002 (20766) FOUNDATIONS OF SPECIAL EDUCATI
EDUC 0221 INTRODUCTION TO STUDENTS WITH EXCEPTIONAL LEARNING NEEDS (3)
This course will focus on students who meet the criteria for categories of disabilities that are identified by education law, as well as students with other exceptional learning needs.� An exploration of case studies of individuals in the context of schools will facilitate an understanding of laws, history, litigation, individualized education programs, Response to Intervention (RTI), and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principles.� Course participants will explore strategies for developing differentiated learning experiences that address learner variability while maintaining high expectations for all students.� Race, ethnicity, gender, and economic status are examined as they apply to students with exceptional learning needs.� Historical and current approaches to the education and inclusion of students with�exceptional learning needs will be considered, including topics of identification, referral, evaluation, placement, and the use of assistive technologies.� A 15-hour field experience is required.
STAFF MWF 12:35 PM-01:25 PM BATES 125 3.0
EDUC 0221-003 (20576) FOUNDATIONS OF SPECIAL EDUCATI
EDUC 0221 INTRODUCTION TO STUDENTS WITH EXCEPTIONAL LEARNING NEEDS (3)
This course will focus on students who meet the criteria for categories of disabilities that are identified by education law, as well as students with other exceptional learning needs.� An exploration of case studies of individuals in the context of schools will facilitate an understanding of laws, history, litigation, individualized education programs, Response to Intervention (RTI), and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principles.� Course participants will explore strategies for developing differentiated learning experiences that address learner variability while maintaining high expectations for all students.� Race, ethnicity, gender, and economic status are examined as they apply to students with exceptional learning needs.� Historical and current approaches to the education and inclusion of students with�exceptional learning needs will be considered, including topics of identification, referral, evaluation, placement, and the use of assistive technologies.� A 15-hour field experience is required.
STAFF MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM WILSN 314 3.0
EDUC 0222-001 (21184) LEARNG DISAB. INSTRUC STRAT
EDUC 0222 LEARNING DISABILITIES AND INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES (3)
This course introduces teacher candidates to the history, etiology, assessment, and identification of best practices for educating students with a range of specific learning disabilities, Understanding and implementing Individualized Education Programs and 504 plans in the general education setting will be addressed. The impact of learning difficulties and the student's social and emotional development will be emphasized along with cultural and contextual considerations to align with the department's commitment to Critical Engagement with Diversity and Social Justice.
PR STAFF M 04:30 PM-06:55 PM BATES 111 3.0
EDUC 0223-001 (21185) CRITICAL ROLES AND RESPONSIBL
EDUC 0223 CRITICAL ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE SPECIAL EDUCATOR (3)
This course provides an in-depth exploration of the responsibilities of the special educator including application of the principles of IDEA, the use of language and culturally appropriate formal assessments, development and implementation of Individual Education Programs (IEP), and collaboration with school teams, paraprofessionals, and families. The course focuses on equity in education regardless of ability, race, language and culture, and a collaborative approach to meeting the needs of all students. It is aligned to the department's commitment to Critical Engagement with Diversity, Social Justice, and Building Community.
PR McLeod, T TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM BATES 125 3.0
EDUC 0301-001 (20072) MTHDS TEACH MATH: ELEM
EDUC 0301 METHODS OF TEACHING MATHEMATICS, ELEMENTARY 1-6 (2)
This course is designed to prepare pre-service teachers to teach mathematics effectively to diverse learners at different levels of readiness in elementary classrooms grades 1-6.� The course will develop teacher candidates' ability to facilitate elementary students' understanding and application of mathematical concepts in engaging and meaningful ways.� Throughout the course candidates will read and discuss case studies written by practicing elementary teachers and analyze video of authentic elementary school mathematics instruction.� Emphasis will be placed on National Council of Teachers of Mathematics supported pedagogy and assessment and on the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Mathematics grades 1-6.� Course participates will design lesson plans that includes measurable learning outcomes and best instructional practices in mathematics for elementary students.
PR Lee, J TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM BATES 113 2.0
EDUC 0301-002 (21186) MTHDS TEACH MATH: ELEM
EDUC 0301 METHODS OF TEACHING MATHEMATICS, ELEMENTARY 1-6 (2)
This course is designed to prepare pre-service teachers to teach mathematics effectively to diverse learners at different levels of readiness in elementary classrooms grades 1-6.� The course will develop teacher candidates' ability to facilitate elementary students' understanding and application of mathematical concepts in engaging and meaningful ways.� Throughout the course candidates will read and discuss case studies written by practicing elementary teachers and analyze video of authentic elementary school mathematics instruction.� Emphasis will be placed on National Council of Teachers of Mathematics supported pedagogy and assessment and on the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Mathematics grades 1-6.� Course participates will design lesson plans that includes measurable learning outcomes and best instructional practices in mathematics for elementary students.
PR Lee, J T 04:25 PM-06:55 PM BATES 113 2.0
EDUC 0302-001 (20088) MTHDS TEACH MATH: ECED
EDUC 0302 METHODS OF TEACHING MATHEMATICS, EARLY CHILDHOOD PREK-2 (2)
This course is designed to prepare pre-service teachers to teach mathematics effectively to diverse learners at different levels of readiness in elementary classrooms grades PreK-2.� The course will develop teacher candidates' ability to facilitate early childhood students' understanding and application of mathematical concepts in engaging and meaningful ways.� Throughout the course candidates will read and discuss case studies written by practicing early childhood teachers and analyze video of authentic elementary school mathematics instruction.� Emphasis will be placed on National Council of Teachers of Mathematics supported pedagogy and assessment and on the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Mathematics grades PreK-2.� Participants will design a lesson plan that includes measurable outcomes.
PR STAFF R 04:25 PM-06:55 PM BATES 125 2.0
EDUC 0303-001 (21187) FOUNDATIONS OF READING
EDUC 0303 FOUNDATIONS OF READING (4)
This course provides the prospective teacher with an introduction to early literacy and reading development.�The course emphasizes a foundation in the major components of reading.�Content includes beginning theoretical principles and research based strategies for assessment and diagnostic practices as well as instructional strategies for phonological awareness, phonics and other word recognition strategies, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension. The interaction between readers and texts of different genres are explored and the needs of English language learners are embedded throughout the curriculum.�Critical literacy, language variation, equity in text representation, and access to literacy are emphasized in this course to align with the department's commitment to Critical Engagement with Diversity and Social Justice. Note: The course is aligned with the objectives of the Massachusetts Test of Educator Licensure (MTEL) in Foundations of Reading, Field 190. Students should take this course prior to taking this MTEL.
Grimaldi, S MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM BATES 214 4.0
EDUC 0303-002 (21188) FOUNDATIONS OF READING
EDUC 0303 FOUNDATIONS OF READING (4)
This course provides the prospective teacher with an introduction to early literacy and reading development.�The course emphasizes a foundation in the major components of reading.�Content includes beginning theoretical principles and research based strategies for assessment and diagnostic practices as well as instructional strategies for phonological awareness, phonics and other word recognition strategies, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension. The interaction between readers and texts of different genres are explored and the needs of English language learners are embedded throughout the curriculum.�Critical literacy, language variation, equity in text representation, and access to literacy are emphasized in this course to align with the department's commitment to Critical Engagement with Diversity and Social Justice. Note: The course is aligned with the objectives of the Massachusetts Test of Educator Licensure (MTEL) in Foundations of Reading, Field 190. Students should take this course prior to taking this MTEL.
Grimaldi, S MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM BATES 214 4.0
EDUC 0303-003 (21189) FOUNDATIONS OF READING
EDUC 0303 FOUNDATIONS OF READING (4)
This course provides the prospective teacher with an introduction to early literacy and reading development.�The course emphasizes a foundation in the major components of reading.�Content includes beginning theoretical principles and research based strategies for assessment and diagnostic practices as well as instructional strategies for phonological awareness, phonics and other word recognition strategies, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension. The interaction between readers and texts of different genres are explored and the needs of English language learners are embedded throughout the curriculum.�Critical literacy, language variation, equity in text representation, and access to literacy are emphasized in this course to align with the department's commitment to Critical Engagement with Diversity and Social Justice. Note: The course is aligned with the objectives of the Massachusetts Test of Educator Licensure (MTEL) in Foundations of Reading, Field 190. Students should take this course prior to taking this MTEL.
Grimaldi, S MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM BATES 214 4.0
EDUC 0303-005 (21190) FOUNDATIONS OF READING
EDUC 0303 FOUNDATIONS OF READING (4)
This course provides the prospective teacher with an introduction to early literacy and reading development.�The course emphasizes a foundation in the major components of reading.�Content includes beginning theoretical principles and research based strategies for assessment and diagnostic practices as well as instructional strategies for phonological awareness, phonics and other word recognition strategies, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension. The interaction between readers and texts of different genres are explored and the needs of English language learners are embedded throughout the curriculum.�Critical literacy, language variation, equity in text representation, and access to literacy are emphasized in this course to align with the department's commitment to Critical Engagement with Diversity and Social Justice. Note: The course is aligned with the objectives of the Massachusetts Test of Educator Licensure (MTEL) in Foundations of Reading, Field 190. Students should take this course prior to taking this MTEL.
Berkowitz, S T 04:25 PM-06:55 PM
Hybrid
BATES 225 4.0
EDUC 0304-001 (21191) TEACHING WRITING: K-6
EDUC 0304 TEACHING WRITING: PRE-K-6 (3)
This course will focus on teaching writing of all discourse styles including personal narrative, creative writing, argument, information/explanatory texts, and poetry for early childhood and elementary populations including English language learners and students with variable learning needs.� It will emphasize the competencies for grades K-6 included in the Massachusetts Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and best teaching and assessment practices.� Students will have the opportunity to apply learning with K-6 students in an apprenticeship linked to the course or to apply learning to students' authentic writing samples.
PR STAFF M 04:30 PM-06:55 PM BATES 125 3.0
EDUC 0305-002 (21192) TCHNG AND WRTG CHILDRENS LIT
EDUC 0305 TEACHING WRITING, CHILDREN'S LITERATURE, AND DISCIPLINARY LITERACY (3)
This course provides the prospective teacher with an introduction to the foundations of written language expression, with a specific focus on orthographic and writing development, literature and nonfiction texts, and critical literacy practices. Equity in text representation, critical literacy practices, and the power of voice in narrative and nonnarrative writing are emphasized to align with the department's commitment to Critical Engagement with Diversity and Building Community.
PR STAFF TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM BATES 125 3.0
EDUC 0305-003 (21193) TCHNG AND WRTG CHILDRENS LIT
EDUC 0305 TEACHING WRITING, CHILDREN'S LITERATURE, AND DISCIPLINARY LITERACY (3)
This course provides the prospective teacher with an introduction to the foundations of written language expression, with a specific focus on orthographic and writing development, literature and nonfiction texts, and critical literacy practices. Equity in text representation, critical literacy practices, and the power of voice in narrative and nonnarrative writing are emphasized to align with the department's commitment to Critical Engagement with Diversity and Building Community.
PR STAFF TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM BATES 3.0
EDUC 0305-004 (21194) TCHNG AND WRTG CHILDRENS LIT
EDUC 0305 TEACHING WRITING, CHILDREN'S LITERATURE, AND DISCIPLINARY LITERACY (3)
This course provides the prospective teacher with an introduction to the foundations of written language expression, with a specific focus on orthographic and writing development, literature and nonfiction texts, and critical literacy practices. Equity in text representation, critical literacy practices, and the power of voice in narrative and nonnarrative writing are emphasized to align with the department's commitment to Critical Engagement with Diversity and Building Community.
PR STAFF TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM BATES 3.0
EDUC 0306-001 (20092) ELEM CURR AND INSTRUC
EDUC 0306 ELEMENTARY CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION (3)
This course offers a foundation in elementary curriculum design, development, and implementation.� Course participants will investigate how educators design and teach units that are anchored in rich content and authentic learning and assessment experiences.� Culturally responsive curricula and teaching practices that meet the needs of all learners are explored and implemented through readings, discussions and guided activities in unit and lesson development.� Differentiation and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) are practices applied to a backwards design approach to curriculum development.� Course participants create well-structured lessons with measurable outcomes anchored in the big ideas of academic disciplines.� They explore a range of informal and formal assessment methods and teaching approaches as they work in the field to create inclusive learning environments that value diversity, empower students as learners, support the success of all students, and embrace family and community collaboration.� Throughout the course, participants engage in critical reflection relative to their work in both the course and the elementary classroom.� They develop the capacity to use observation anecdotal notes, and feedback from the course instructor and supervising practitioner to improve their developing practice and sense of professionalism.� A 30-hour field experience in an elementary setting is required.
PR STAFF MWF 08:15 AM-09:05 AM BATES 118 3.0
EDUC 0306-002 (20100) ELEM CURR AND INSTRUC
EDUC 0306 ELEMENTARY CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION (3)
This course offers a foundation in elementary curriculum design, development, and implementation.� Course participants will investigate how educators design and teach units that are anchored in rich content and authentic learning and assessment experiences.� Culturally responsive curricula and teaching practices that meet the needs of all learners are explored and implemented through readings, discussions and guided activities in unit and lesson development.� Differentiation and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) are practices applied to a backwards design approach to curriculum development.� Course participants create well-structured lessons with measurable outcomes anchored in the big ideas of academic disciplines.� They explore a range of informal and formal assessment methods and teaching approaches as they work in the field to create inclusive learning environments that value diversity, empower students as learners, support the success of all students, and embrace family and community collaboration.� Throughout the course, participants engage in critical reflection relative to their work in both the course and the elementary classroom.� They develop the capacity to use observation anecdotal notes, and feedback from the course instructor and supervising practitioner to improve their developing practice and sense of professionalism.� A 30-hour field experience in an elementary setting is required.
PR STAFF MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM ELY 212 3.0
EDUC 0308-001 (20083) EARLY CHILD CURRICULUM
EDUC 0308 EARLY CHILDHOOD CURRICULUM (3)
This course offers a foundation in early childhood curriculum design, development, and implementation.� Course participants will examine how early childhood educators design and teach standards-based units of study that are anchored in rich content and authentic learning and assessment experiences.� Culturally responsive curricula and teaching practices that convey high expectations and meet the needs of all learners are explored through readings, discussions, and guided activities.� Differentiation and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) practices are applied to a backward design approach to curriculum development.� As part of the course, students apply course knowledge, skills, and understandings in an early childhood field placement.� Course participants create well-structured lessons with measurable outcomes and explore a range of informal and formal assessment methods and teaching approaches.� In their field placement, students practice skills for effective and respectful partnerships with families, and work to create safe and inclusive learning environments that value diversity, empower students as learners, encourage positive behavior, and embrace collaboration with school colleagues and the community.� Throughout the course, students engage in critical reflection relative to their work in both the course and the early childhood classroom.� Students develop the capacity to use observation, anecdotal notes, and feedback from course instructor and supervising practitioner to improve their developing practice and sense of professionalism.� A 30-hour field experience in an approved PreK-2 setting is required.
PR Tager, M MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM BATES 113 3.0
EDUC 0308-002 (21176) EARLY CHILD CURRICULUM
EDUC 0308 EARLY CHILDHOOD CURRICULUM (3)
This course offers a foundation in early childhood curriculum design, development, and implementation.� Course participants will examine how early childhood educators design and teach standards-based units of study that are anchored in rich content and authentic learning and assessment experiences.� Culturally responsive curricula and teaching practices that convey high expectations and meet the needs of all learners are explored through readings, discussions, and guided activities.� Differentiation and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) practices are applied to a backward design approach to curriculum development.� As part of the course, students apply course knowledge, skills, and understandings in an early childhood field placement.� Course participants create well-structured lessons with measurable outcomes and explore a range of informal and formal assessment methods and teaching approaches.� In their field placement, students practice skills for effective and respectful partnerships with families, and work to create safe and inclusive learning environments that value diversity, empower students as learners, encourage positive behavior, and embrace collaboration with school colleagues and the community.� Throughout the course, students engage in critical reflection relative to their work in both the course and the early childhood classroom.� Students develop the capacity to use observation, anecdotal notes, and feedback from course instructor and supervising practitioner to improve their developing practice and sense of professionalism.� A 30-hour field experience in an approved PreK-2 setting is required.
PR Tager, M MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM BATES 113 3.0
EDUC 0309-001 (20071) CHILDRENS LITERATURE
EDUC 0309 CHILDREN'S LITERATURE (3)
This course is designed to provide teachers with a background of the major objectives and purposes for children's literature in today's classroom. Major emphasis will be given to a review of various types of children's literature, ways to share literature effectively with children, the use of new literacies to encourage more reading, and the establishment of library centers within the classroom setting. Areas of specialization such as award winning books, key illustrators, poetry, and traditional literature also will be included.
Tager, M MW 12:35 PM-01:25 PM BATES 113 3.0
EDUC 0311-001 (20075) SOC STUDIES IN ELEM SCHOOL
EDUC 0311 SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (3)
Requires students to examine actively the basic principles underlying Social Studies. It requires that students become aware of unifying concepts and generalizations related to the realities of how people live and interact. Examination of traditional and current Social Studies projects is a matter of concern. Concurrently, production of materials and use of procedures promoting apt combinations of cognitive affective and psychomotor behaviors are expected.
PR Risler, L W 04:30 PM-06:55 PM BATES 8 3.0
EDUC 0311-002 (21540) SOC STUDIES IN ELEM SCHOOL
EDUC 0311 SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (3)
Requires students to examine actively the basic principles underlying Social Studies. It requires that students become aware of unifying concepts and generalizations related to the realities of how people live and interact. Examination of traditional and current Social Studies projects is a matter of concern. Concurrently, production of materials and use of procedures promoting apt combinations of cognitive affective and psychomotor behaviors are expected.
PR Risler, L MWF 12:35 PM-01:25 PM BATES 223 3.0
EDUC 0314-001 (21195) CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT
EDUC 0314 BUILDING CLASSROOM COMMUNITIES (3)
This course offers an introduction to practices for organizing and managing a classroom in ways that establish and sustain an inclusive and safe learning environment. Teacher beliefs and their impact on classroom management and student social/emotional learning are critically examined. Emphasis is placed on proactive planning, teacher language, and positive and restorative practices. Equity, community, and care are emphasized int his course to align with the department's commitment to Building Community, Reflective Practice, and Social Justice.
PR Risler, L MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM BATES 223 3.0
EDUC 0319-001 (20099) FOUND OF TEACHNG AND LEARNING
EDUC 0319 FOUNDATIONS OF TEACHING AND LEARNING (3)
This course is the first of a series of three methods courses for the prospective teacher. In this introductory methods course, students will focus on the foundations of teaching, learning, and assessment and the creation and critical evaluation of curriculum materials, including well-structured lessons and meeting diverse needs. Examining personal bias and assumptions and the critical evaluation of instritutional practices that create inequities and curricular materials are emphasized in this course to align with the department's commitment to Critical Engagement with Diversity and Reflective Practice.
PR Lee, J TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM BATES 8 3.0
EDUC 0319-003 (20076) FOUND OF TEACHNG AND LEARNING
EDUC 0319 FOUNDATIONS OF TEACHING AND LEARNING (3)
This course is the first of a series of three methods courses for the prospective teacher. In this introductory methods course, students will focus on the foundations of teaching, learning, and assessment and the creation and critical evaluation of curriculum materials, including well-structured lessons and meeting diverse needs. Examining personal bias and assumptions and the critical evaluation of instritutional practices that create inequities and curricular materials are emphasized in this course to align with the department's commitment to Critical Engagement with Diversity and Reflective Practice.
PR Risler, L MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM BATES 8 3.0
EDUC 0319-005 (21196) FOUND OF TEACHNG AND LEARNING
EDUC 0319 FOUNDATIONS OF TEACHING AND LEARNING (3)
This course is the first of a series of three methods courses for the prospective teacher. In this introductory methods course, students will focus on the foundations of teaching, learning, and assessment and the creation and critical evaluation of curriculum materials, including well-structured lessons and meeting diverse needs. Examining personal bias and assumptions and the critical evaluation of instritutional practices that create inequities and curricular materials are emphasized in this course to align with the department's commitment to Critical Engagement with Diversity and Reflective Practice.
PR STAFF M 04:30 PM-06:55 PM BATES 210 3.0
EDUC 0320-001 (21197) FIELD EXPRNCE 1: BECMNG A TCHR
EDUC 0320 FIELD EXPERIENCE 1: BECOMING A TEACHER (1)
Field Experience 1 provides the prospective teacher the opportunity to enter their first placement in intentionally selected schools that will allow them to reflect on their desire and define their commitment to become educators. Students will be placed in PreK-12 partner schools with the goal of connecting theories of education to practice, including well-structured lessons. Students will critically reflect on teaching models to formulate their own vision. Students will continue to build their education portfolio in seminar sessions of big ideas, emerging philosophies, and instructional practices that will thread through their coursework. Critical reflection is emphasized in this course to align with the department's commitment to Reflective Practice and Scholarship. Each credit of Field Experience should correspond to approximately 30 hours in the field and 10 hours in seminar.
PR STAFF ONLINE 1.0
EDUC 0321-001 (20526) THE MIDDLE SCH AND ITS STUDENTS
EDUC 0321 THE MIDDLE SCHOOL AND ITS STUDENTS (3)
Participants in this course will explore the unique social, emotional, physical, and cognitive needs of middle grade learners with and without special needs.� Focus will be placed on utilizing an asset vs. deficit model, as well as the importance of understanding one's own dispositional/cultural mindset.� In order to create developmentally responsive schools, classrooms, lessons, and interactions, research-based practices will be emphasized.
STAFF R 04:30 PM-06:55 PM BATES 113 3.0
EDUC 0354-002 (20122) EDUC PLAN AND EVAL:MIDDLE/SECOND
EDUC 0354 EDUCATIONAL PLANNING AND EVALUATION: MIDDLE AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS (3)
This course introduces students to the work of teachers at the middle and high school levels.� Students are provided theoretical grounding and practical experiences in curriculum planning, instructional strategies, classroom assessment, classroom management, and professionalism.� This course also prepares students for reflective, collaborative, and culturally responsive pedagogical practices.� A 30-hour pre-practicum that involves teaching, classroom observation, and completing a Field Experience Manual is a requirement of the course.
PR Bailey, E TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM BATES 125 3.0
EDUC 0360-001 (21537) CMTY ENGAGED LEARNING FOR EDUC
EDUC 0360 CIVIC ENGAGEMENT CAPSTONE: LEARNING IN COMMUNITY (3-9)
This course is designed to provide students with an alternative to practicum, allowing for a field experience in which students can engage with professionals, students, family, and community members, as they apply, test, evaluate, and integrate the knowledge, skills, and dispositions developed in their education coursework. Students' occupational, academic, and�civic engagement interests will determine placements, which may include more than one setting and/or working with a small cohort on a project. Course requirements include weekly reflections connecting student observations and work int he placement to the scholarly work, multiple on-campus seminars, a civic engagement project, and a final presentation. Note: This course does not meet the requirements for Practicum. Each credit should correspond to approximately 40 hours in the field.
STAFF M 03:10 PM-04:25 PM BATES 125
EDUC 0363-001 (20527) SOS:SHELTERED ENGLISH IMMERSI
EDUC 0363 SHELTERED ENGLISH IMMERSION (3)
This course teaches the knowledge, skills, and dispositions essential to effectively shelter content instruction in English. Students will understand the social, political, historical and cultural issues, and intersections of race, identity, and power, that shape the school experience of English Learners. Students learn asset-based frameworks, methods, and strategies for language development within subject area content. Students use the World Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) Standards in conjunction with Massachusetts PreK-12 curriculum standards. The course integrates critical pedagogy and language instruction to align with the department's commitment to Social Justice, Critical Engagement with Diversity, and Reflective Practice. The minimum grade needed for SEI endorsement is B- for the 2021-2022 year, and B for 2022 and beyond.
Ortiz, F TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM WILSN 304 3.0
EDUC 0363-002 (20101) SHELTERED ENGLISH IMMERSION
EDUC 0363 SHELTERED ENGLISH IMMERSION (3)
This course teaches the knowledge, skills, and dispositions essential to effectively shelter content instruction in English. Students will understand the social, political, historical and cultural issues, and intersections of race, identity, and power, that shape the school experience of English Learners. Students learn asset-based frameworks, methods, and strategies for language development within subject area content. Students use the World Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) Standards in conjunction with Massachusetts PreK-12 curriculum standards. The course integrates critical pedagogy and language instruction to align with the department's commitment to Social Justice, Critical Engagement with Diversity, and Reflective Practice. The minimum grade needed for SEI endorsement is B- for the 2021-2022 year, and B for 2022 and beyond.
Ortiz, F TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 304 3.0
EDUC 0363-003 (20120) SHELTERED ENGLISH IMMERSION
EDUC 0363 SHELTERED ENGLISH IMMERSION (3)
This course teaches the knowledge, skills, and dispositions essential to effectively shelter content instruction in English. Students will understand the social, political, historical and cultural issues, and intersections of race, identity, and power, that shape the school experience of English Learners. Students learn asset-based frameworks, methods, and strategies for language development within subject area content. Students use the World Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) Standards in conjunction with Massachusetts PreK-12 curriculum standards. The course integrates critical pedagogy and language instruction to align with the department's commitment to Social Justice, Critical Engagement with Diversity, and Reflective Practice. The minimum grade needed for SEI endorsement is B- for the 2021-2022 year, and B for 2022 and beyond.
Hafner, A M 04:15 PM-06:45 PM BATES 126 3.0
EDUC 0363-004 (20079) SHELTERED ENGLISH IMMERSION
EDUC 0363 SHELTERED ENGLISH IMMERSION (3)
This course teaches the knowledge, skills, and dispositions essential to effectively shelter content instruction in English. Students will understand the social, political, historical and cultural issues, and intersections of race, identity, and power, that shape the school experience of English Learners. Students learn asset-based frameworks, methods, and strategies for language development within subject area content. Students use the World Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) Standards in conjunction with Massachusetts PreK-12 curriculum standards. The course integrates critical pedagogy and language instruction to align with the department's commitment to Social Justice, Critical Engagement with Diversity, and Reflective Practice. The minimum grade needed for SEI endorsement is B- for the 2021-2022 year, and B for 2022 and beyond.
Hafner, A MWF 12:35 PM-01:25 PM BATES 126 3.0
EDUC 0363-005 (20082) SHELTERED ENGLISH IMMERSION
EDUC 0363 SHELTERED ENGLISH IMMERSION (3)
This course teaches the knowledge, skills, and dispositions essential to effectively shelter content instruction in English. Students will understand the social, political, historical and cultural issues, and intersections of race, identity, and power, that shape the school experience of English Learners. Students learn asset-based frameworks, methods, and strategies for language development within subject area content. Students use the World Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) Standards in conjunction with Massachusetts PreK-12 curriculum standards. The course integrates critical pedagogy and language instruction to align with the department's commitment to Social Justice, Critical Engagement with Diversity, and Reflective Practice. The minimum grade needed for SEI endorsement is B- for the 2021-2022 year, and B for 2022 and beyond.
Ortiz, F TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM WILSN 304 3.0
EDUC 0363-006 (21562) SHELTERED ENGLISH IMMERSION
EDUC 0363 SHELTERED ENGLISH IMMERSION (3)
This course teaches the knowledge, skills, and dispositions essential to effectively shelter content instruction in English. Students will understand the social, political, historical and cultural issues, and intersections of race, identity, and power, that shape the school experience of English Learners. Students learn asset-based frameworks, methods, and strategies for language development within subject area content. Students use the World Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) Standards in conjunction with Massachusetts PreK-12 curriculum standards. The course integrates critical pedagogy and language instruction to align with the department's commitment to Social Justice, Critical Engagement with Diversity, and Reflective Practice. The minimum grade needed for SEI endorsement is B- for the 2021-2022 year, and B for 2022 and beyond.
Ortiz, F R 04:30 PM-06:55 PM BATES 210 3.0
EDUC 0370-001 (20090) LANG/COMM DEV AND INTERVENTION
EDUC 0370 LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION DEVELOPMENT AND INTERVENTION (3)
This course examines language and communication with an emphasis on continuity and variation in development. The developmental process of acquiring oral and written language and communication skills will be introduced. In addition, the impact of exceptional learning needs and cultural and linguistic diversity on language and communication development and use will be examined. Students will explore strategies for assessing and supporting language and communication skills, including the use of augmentative and alternative communication approaches and other assistive technologies. Students will consider language and communication teaching from a Universal Design for Learning perspective and will be exposed to culturally responsive interventions that support oral and written language proficiency and communicative competence. Issues and practices related to language and culturally appropriate assessment and intervention for speech, language, and communication difficulties will be examined in alignment with the department's commitment to Critical Engagement with Diversity and Social Justice.
PR STAFF T 04:00 PM-06:30 PM BATES 126 3.0
EDUC 0371-001 (20086) SPECIAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM
EDUC 0371 SPECIAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM (3)
This course offers a foundation in special education curriculum design, development, and implementation.� Course participants will investigate how special educators design and teach units reflecting high expectations that are anchored in rich content and authentic learning and assessment experiences.� Culturally responsive curricula and teaching practices that meet the needs of all learners are explored and implemented through readings, discussions and guided activities in unit lesson development.� Differentiation and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) are practices applied to a backwards design approach to curriculum development.� The dual mandate of inclusion and meeting individual needs requires that special educators must develop a wide array of subject matter knowledge, develop skills in instructional approaches which support differentiation, use a variety of assessment tools, and analyze the results to continue in the design of effective and rigorous standards-based units of instruction.� As part of the course, students develop a unit and apply course knowledge, skills and understandings.� In their field placements students construct and implement lessons informed by assessments.� Throughout the course, students engage in critical reflection upon all curricular components including cultural, linguistic and community responsiveness, the maintenance of a safe and well-managed classroom, and the development of a collaborative learning environment for students, families, and team members.� A 30-hour field experience in an approved special education setting for students with moderate disabilities is required.
PR McLeod, T TR 08:15 AM-09:30 AM BATES 126 3.0
EDUC 0374-001 (21177) CAREER EDUC/TRANS STDT W/DISAB
EDUC 0374 CAREER EDUCATION AND TRANSITION FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES (3)
This course addresses transition assessment and person-centered planning for students with disabilities in preparation for their exist from the educational system to the adult service system, jobs, or further education. Collaboration with school and community-based professionals and resources will be emphasized in the development of effective transition plans that recognize the students' language, culture, race, and ethnicity. Federal and state laws and mandates will be reviewed to include issues of discrimination in programs and services. Intentional, individually driven planning reflects the department's commitment to Critical Engagement with Diversity.
PR STAFF M 04:30 PM-06:50 PM BATES 212 3.0
EDUC 0376-001 (21178) DEV. DISABL AND SELF DETERM.
EDUC 0376 SELF DETERMINATION AND FAMILY ADVOCACY FOR STUDENTS WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES (3)
This course provides the prospective teacher with the foundational kowledge to effectively work with students with developmental disabilities and their families. Descriptions of specific disabilities; identification of learning and behavioral strengths and needs; utilization of evidence-based practices for supporting these students, including training for general education teachers, self-advocacy; and strategies for home-school collaboration are explored. This course is aligned with the department's commitment to Building Community and Reflective Practice.
PR STAFF R 04:30 PM-06:55 PM BATES 118 3.0
EDUC 0382-002 (21200) LANG DEV AND EMERGENT LITERACY
EDUC 0382 LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT AND EMERGENT LITERACY (3)
This course offers the prospective early childhood teacher/caregiver the theoretical background and practical knowledge critical for supporting language and literacy development in the youngest of learners. Course participants will explore developmental and cultural influences on early language and literacy development and examine universally designed, culturally sustaining methods materials, and assessments for use in supporting language and emergent literacy skills in infants, toddlers, and young children. Topics include the role of teachers and caregivers in partnering with families to support children's language and early literacy development; dual language learning and multilingualism in the early years; the role of children's literature, play, and the arts in supporting young children's oral and written language development; and the use of assistive technology to support language development in young children with disabilities. This course aligns with the department's commitment to Critical Engagement with Diversity, Community Building, and Social Justice.
Griffin, T TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM
Hybrid
BATES 126 3.0
EDUC 0396-001 (20583) TECHNGLY, TEACHNG AND LEARNING
EDUC 0396 TECHNOLOGY, TEACHING, AND LEARNING (3)
This course is designed to help students explore the current technology landscape. Digital tools, collaboration, critical analysis of technology in teaching and learning, and digital literacy will be explored and applied. Equitable access, the digital divide and applications are emphasized in this course to align with the department's commitment to Reflective Practice and Social Justice.
PR Raker, D MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM BATES 221 3.0
EDUC 0396-002 (20584) TECHNGLY, TEACHNG AND LEARNING
EDUC 0396 TECHNOLOGY, TEACHING, AND LEARNING (3)
This course is designed to help students explore the current technology landscape. Digital tools, collaboration, critical analysis of technology in teaching and learning, and digital literacy will be explored and applied. Equitable access, the digital divide and applications are emphasized in this course to align with the department's commitment to Reflective Practice and Social Justice.
PR Raker, D MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM BATES 221 3.0
EDUC 0398-001 (21201) ST: PRACTICUM SEMINAR
EDUC 0398 SPECIAL TOPICS IN EDUCATION (3)
An in-depth study of a limited or specialized area within the education field. Course content will vary according to the area of specialization of the instructor and the interest of the students. May be repeated if course content differs.
STAFF W 04:30 PM-06:00 PM REMSYC 2.0
English
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
ENGL 0101-001 (20137) COMPOSITION 1
ENGL 0101 COMPOSITION I: RHETORIC AND INQUIRY (4)
A writing course taken fall or spring of students' first year that introduces them to the practice of producing texts for different rhetorical occasions. Students use feedback from peers and instructor to strengthen techniques in three stages of the writing process-pre-writing, drafting, and revision-in order to compose rhetorically effective texts for multiple audiences. While summarizing and responding to a range of texts, students learn to situate an original argument within the framework of other speakers, to practice critical inquiry, and to understand conventions associated with a range of rhetorical genres. In addition to writing formally and informally throughout the semester, writers produce a final portfolio whereby they demonstrate, through a variety of projects, meta-cognitive reflection and their ability to incorporate other texts or speakers into their own writing.
Hermansen, P M 08:15 AM-09:05 AM
MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM
ELY 220
ELY 220
4.0 CMP
ENGL 0101-002 (20139) COMPOSITION 1
ENGL 0101 COMPOSITION I: RHETORIC AND INQUIRY (4)
A writing course taken fall or spring of students' first year that introduces them to the practice of producing texts for different rhetorical occasions. Students use feedback from peers and instructor to strengthen techniques in three stages of the writing process-pre-writing, drafting, and revision-in order to compose rhetorically effective texts for multiple audiences. While summarizing and responding to a range of texts, students learn to situate an original argument within the framework of other speakers, to practice critical inquiry, and to understand conventions associated with a range of rhetorical genres. In addition to writing formally and informally throughout the semester, writers produce a final portfolio whereby they demonstrate, through a variety of projects, meta-cognitive reflection and their ability to incorporate other texts or speakers into their own writing.
Todd, E M 10:25 AM-11:15 AM
MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM
BATES 218
BATES 218
4.0 CMP
ENGL 0101-003 (20140) COMPOSITION 1
ENGL 0101 COMPOSITION I: RHETORIC AND INQUIRY (4)
A writing course taken fall or spring of students' first year that introduces them to the practice of producing texts for different rhetorical occasions. Students use feedback from peers and instructor to strengthen techniques in three stages of the writing process-pre-writing, drafting, and revision-in order to compose rhetorically effective texts for multiple audiences. While summarizing and responding to a range of texts, students learn to situate an original argument within the framework of other speakers, to practice critical inquiry, and to understand conventions associated with a range of rhetorical genres. In addition to writing formally and informally throughout the semester, writers produce a final portfolio whereby they demonstrate, through a variety of projects, meta-cognitive reflection and their ability to incorporate other texts or speakers into their own writing.
Chen, B M 08:15 AM-09:05 AM
MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM
BATES 210
BATES 210
4.0 CMP
ENGL 0101-005 (20142) COMPOSITION 1
ENGL 0101 COMPOSITION I: RHETORIC AND INQUIRY (4)
A writing course taken fall or spring of students' first year that introduces them to the practice of producing texts for different rhetorical occasions. Students use feedback from peers and instructor to strengthen techniques in three stages of the writing process-pre-writing, drafting, and revision-in order to compose rhetorically effective texts for multiple audiences. While summarizing and responding to a range of texts, students learn to situate an original argument within the framework of other speakers, to practice critical inquiry, and to understand conventions associated with a range of rhetorical genres. In addition to writing formally and informally throughout the semester, writers produce a final portfolio whereby they demonstrate, through a variety of projects, meta-cognitive reflection and their ability to incorporate other texts or speakers into their own writing.
STAFF F 08:15 AM-09:05 AM
MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM
BATES 22
BATES 22
4.0 CMP
ENGL 0101-006 (20141) COMPOSITION 1
ENGL 0101 COMPOSITION I: RHETORIC AND INQUIRY (4)
A writing course taken fall or spring of students' first year that introduces them to the practice of producing texts for different rhetorical occasions. Students use feedback from peers and instructor to strengthen techniques in three stages of the writing process-pre-writing, drafting, and revision-in order to compose rhetorically effective texts for multiple audiences. While summarizing and responding to a range of texts, students learn to situate an original argument within the framework of other speakers, to practice critical inquiry, and to understand conventions associated with a range of rhetorical genres. In addition to writing formally and informally throughout the semester, writers produce a final portfolio whereby they demonstrate, through a variety of projects, meta-cognitive reflection and their ability to incorporate other texts or speakers into their own writing.
Chen, B F 11:30 AM-12:20 PM
MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM
BATES 210
BATES 210
4.0 CMP
ENGL 0101-007 (20152) COMPOSITION 1
ENGL 0101 COMPOSITION I: RHETORIC AND INQUIRY (4)
A writing course taken fall or spring of students' first year that introduces them to the practice of producing texts for different rhetorical occasions. Students use feedback from peers and instructor to strengthen techniques in three stages of the writing process-pre-writing, drafting, and revision-in order to compose rhetorically effective texts for multiple audiences. While summarizing and responding to a range of texts, students learn to situate an original argument within the framework of other speakers, to practice critical inquiry, and to understand conventions associated with a range of rhetorical genres. In addition to writing formally and informally throughout the semester, writers produce a final portfolio whereby they demonstrate, through a variety of projects, meta-cognitive reflection and their ability to incorporate other texts or speakers into their own writing.
STAFF M 11:30 AM-12:20 PM
MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM
BATES 125
BATES 125
4.0 CMP
ENGL 0101-008 (20217) COMPOSITION 1
ENGL 0101 COMPOSITION I: RHETORIC AND INQUIRY (4)
A writing course taken fall or spring of students' first year that introduces them to the practice of producing texts for different rhetorical occasions. Students use feedback from peers and instructor to strengthen techniques in three stages of the writing process-pre-writing, drafting, and revision-in order to compose rhetorically effective texts for multiple audiences. While summarizing and responding to a range of texts, students learn to situate an original argument within the framework of other speakers, to practice critical inquiry, and to understand conventions associated with a range of rhetorical genres. In addition to writing formally and informally throughout the semester, writers produce a final portfolio whereby they demonstrate, through a variety of projects, meta-cognitive reflection and their ability to incorporate other texts or speakers into their own writing.
STAFF W 10:25 AM-11:15 AM
MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM
BATES 218
BATES 218
4.0 CMP
ENGL 0101-009 (20155) COMPOSITION 1
ENGL 0101 COMPOSITION I: RHETORIC AND INQUIRY (4)
A writing course taken fall or spring of students' first year that introduces them to the practice of producing texts for different rhetorical occasions. Students use feedback from peers and instructor to strengthen techniques in three stages of the writing process-pre-writing, drafting, and revision-in order to compose rhetorically effective texts for multiple audiences. While summarizing and responding to a range of texts, students learn to situate an original argument within the framework of other speakers, to practice critical inquiry, and to understand conventions associated with a range of rhetorical genres. In addition to writing formally and informally throughout the semester, writers produce a final portfolio whereby they demonstrate, through a variety of projects, meta-cognitive reflection and their ability to incorporate other texts or speakers into their own writing.
STAFF M 01:40 PM-02:30 PM
MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM
BATES 212
BATES 212
4.0 CMP
ENGL 0101-010 (20220) COMPOSITION 1
ENGL 0101 COMPOSITION I: RHETORIC AND INQUIRY (4)
A writing course taken fall or spring of students' first year that introduces them to the practice of producing texts for different rhetorical occasions. Students use feedback from peers and instructor to strengthen techniques in three stages of the writing process-pre-writing, drafting, and revision-in order to compose rhetorically effective texts for multiple audiences. While summarizing and responding to a range of texts, students learn to situate an original argument within the framework of other speakers, to practice critical inquiry, and to understand conventions associated with a range of rhetorical genres. In addition to writing formally and informally throughout the semester, writers produce a final portfolio whereby they demonstrate, through a variety of projects, meta-cognitive reflection and their ability to incorporate other texts or speakers into their own writing.
STAFF M 12:35 PM-01:25 PM
MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM
ELY 339
ELY 339
4.0 CMP
ENGL 0101-011 (20238) COMPOSITION 1
ENGL 0101 COMPOSITION I: RHETORIC AND INQUIRY (4)
A writing course taken fall or spring of students' first year that introduces them to the practice of producing texts for different rhetorical occasions. Students use feedback from peers and instructor to strengthen techniques in three stages of the writing process-pre-writing, drafting, and revision-in order to compose rhetorically effective texts for multiple audiences. While summarizing and responding to a range of texts, students learn to situate an original argument within the framework of other speakers, to practice critical inquiry, and to understand conventions associated with a range of rhetorical genres. In addition to writing formally and informally throughout the semester, writers produce a final portfolio whereby they demonstrate, through a variety of projects, meta-cognitive reflection and their ability to incorporate other texts or speakers into their own writing.
STAFF W 11:30 AM-12:20 PM
MWF 12:35 PM-01:25 PM
BATES 111
BATES 111
4.0 CMP
ENGL 0101-012 (20247) COMPOSITION 1
ENGL 0101 COMPOSITION I: RHETORIC AND INQUIRY (4)
A writing course taken fall or spring of students' first year that introduces them to the practice of producing texts for different rhetorical occasions. Students use feedback from peers and instructor to strengthen techniques in three stages of the writing process-pre-writing, drafting, and revision-in order to compose rhetorically effective texts for multiple audiences. While summarizing and responding to a range of texts, students learn to situate an original argument within the framework of other speakers, to practice critical inquiry, and to understand conventions associated with a range of rhetorical genres. In addition to writing formally and informally throughout the semester, writers produce a final portfolio whereby they demonstrate, through a variety of projects, meta-cognitive reflection and their ability to incorporate other texts or speakers into their own writing.
STAFF M 01:40 PM-02:30 PM
MWF 12:35 PM-01:25 PM
BATES 210
BATES 210
4.0 CMP
ENGL 0101-013 (20161) COMPOSITION 1
ENGL 0101 COMPOSITION I: RHETORIC AND INQUIRY (4)
A writing course taken fall or spring of students' first year that introduces them to the practice of producing texts for different rhetorical occasions. Students use feedback from peers and instructor to strengthen techniques in three stages of the writing process-pre-writing, drafting, and revision-in order to compose rhetorically effective texts for multiple audiences. While summarizing and responding to a range of texts, students learn to situate an original argument within the framework of other speakers, to practice critical inquiry, and to understand conventions associated with a range of rhetorical genres. In addition to writing formally and informally throughout the semester, writers produce a final portfolio whereby they demonstrate, through a variety of projects, meta-cognitive reflection and their ability to incorporate other texts or speakers into their own writing.
STAFF W 01:40 PM-02:30 PM
MWF 12:35 PM-01:25 PM
BATES 212
BATES 212
4.0 CMP
ENGL 0101-014 (20162) COMPOSITION 1
ENGL 0101 COMPOSITION I: RHETORIC AND INQUIRY (4)
A writing course taken fall or spring of students' first year that introduces them to the practice of producing texts for different rhetorical occasions. Students use feedback from peers and instructor to strengthen techniques in three stages of the writing process-pre-writing, drafting, and revision-in order to compose rhetorically effective texts for multiple audiences. While summarizing and responding to a range of texts, students learn to situate an original argument within the framework of other speakers, to practice critical inquiry, and to understand conventions associated with a range of rhetorical genres. In addition to writing formally and informally throughout the semester, writers produce a final portfolio whereby they demonstrate, through a variety of projects, meta-cognitive reflection and their ability to incorporate other texts or speakers into their own writing.
STAFF W 03:10 PM-04:00 PM
MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM
BATES 223
BATES 223
4.0 CMP
ENGL 0101-015 (20164) COMPOSITION 1
ENGL 0101 COMPOSITION I: RHETORIC AND INQUIRY (4)
A writing course taken fall or spring of students' first year that introduces them to the practice of producing texts for different rhetorical occasions. Students use feedback from peers and instructor to strengthen techniques in three stages of the writing process-pre-writing, drafting, and revision-in order to compose rhetorically effective texts for multiple audiences. While summarizing and responding to a range of texts, students learn to situate an original argument within the framework of other speakers, to practice critical inquiry, and to understand conventions associated with a range of rhetorical genres. In addition to writing formally and informally throughout the semester, writers produce a final portfolio whereby they demonstrate, through a variety of projects, meta-cognitive reflection and their ability to incorporate other texts or speakers into their own writing.
STAFF W 02:05 PM-02:55 PM
MW 03:10 PM-04:25 PM
BATES 118
BATES 118
4.0 CMP
ENGL 0101-016 (20258) COMPOSITION 1
ENGL 0101 COMPOSITION I: RHETORIC AND INQUIRY (4)
A writing course taken fall or spring of students' first year that introduces them to the practice of producing texts for different rhetorical occasions. Students use feedback from peers and instructor to strengthen techniques in three stages of the writing process-pre-writing, drafting, and revision-in order to compose rhetorically effective texts for multiple audiences. While summarizing and responding to a range of texts, students learn to situate an original argument within the framework of other speakers, to practice critical inquiry, and to understand conventions associated with a range of rhetorical genres. In addition to writing formally and informally throughout the semester, writers produce a final portfolio whereby they demonstrate, through a variety of projects, meta-cognitive reflection and their ability to incorporate other texts or speakers into their own writing.
STAFF T 11:15 AM-12:05 PM
TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM
ELY 348
ELY 348
4.0 CMP
ENGL 0101-017 (20165) COMPOSITION 1
ENGL 0101 COMPOSITION I: RHETORIC AND INQUIRY (4)
A writing course taken fall or spring of students' first year that introduces them to the practice of producing texts for different rhetorical occasions. Students use feedback from peers and instructor to strengthen techniques in three stages of the writing process-pre-writing, drafting, and revision-in order to compose rhetorically effective texts for multiple audiences. While summarizing and responding to a range of texts, students learn to situate an original argument within the framework of other speakers, to practice critical inquiry, and to understand conventions associated with a range of rhetorical genres. In addition to writing formally and informally throughout the semester, writers produce a final portfolio whereby they demonstrate, through a variety of projects, meta-cognitive reflection and their ability to incorporate other texts or speakers into their own writing.
STAFF R 11:15 AM-12:05 PM
TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM
BATES 212
BATES 212
4.0 CMP
ENGL 0101-019 (20189) COMPOSITION 1
ENGL 0101 COMPOSITION I: RHETORIC AND INQUIRY (4)
A writing course taken fall or spring of students' first year that introduces them to the practice of producing texts for different rhetorical occasions. Students use feedback from peers and instructor to strengthen techniques in three stages of the writing process-pre-writing, drafting, and revision-in order to compose rhetorically effective texts for multiple audiences. While summarizing and responding to a range of texts, students learn to situate an original argument within the framework of other speakers, to practice critical inquiry, and to understand conventions associated with a range of rhetorical genres. In addition to writing formally and informally throughout the semester, writers produce a final portfolio whereby they demonstrate, through a variety of projects, meta-cognitive reflection and their ability to incorporate other texts or speakers into their own writing.
STAFF T 12:45 PM-01:35 PM
TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM
BATES
BATES
4.0 CMP
ENGL 0101-020 (20251) COMPOSITION 1
ENGL 0101 COMPOSITION I: RHETORIC AND INQUIRY (4)
A writing course taken fall or spring of students' first year that introduces them to the practice of producing texts for different rhetorical occasions. Students use feedback from peers and instructor to strengthen techniques in three stages of the writing process-pre-writing, drafting, and revision-in order to compose rhetorically effective texts for multiple audiences. While summarizing and responding to a range of texts, students learn to situate an original argument within the framework of other speakers, to practice critical inquiry, and to understand conventions associated with a range of rhetorical genres. In addition to writing formally and informally throughout the semester, writers produce a final portfolio whereby they demonstrate, through a variety of projects, meta-cognitive reflection and their ability to incorporate other texts or speakers into their own writing.
STAFF R 12:45 PM-01:35 PM
TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM
BATES 210
BATES 210
4.0 CMP
ENGL 0101-021 (20210) COMPOSITION 1
ENGL 0101 COMPOSITION I: RHETORIC AND INQUIRY (4)
A writing course taken fall or spring of students' first year that introduces them to the practice of producing texts for different rhetorical occasions. Students use feedback from peers and instructor to strengthen techniques in three stages of the writing process-pre-writing, drafting, and revision-in order to compose rhetorically effective texts for multiple audiences. While summarizing and responding to a range of texts, students learn to situate an original argument within the framework of other speakers, to practice critical inquiry, and to understand conventions associated with a range of rhetorical genres. In addition to writing formally and informally throughout the semester, writers produce a final portfolio whereby they demonstrate, through a variety of projects, meta-cognitive reflection and their ability to incorporate other texts or speakers into their own writing.
STAFF R 11:15 AM-12:05 PM
TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM
ELY 348
ELY 348
4.0 CMP
ENGL 0101-022 (20211) COMPOSITION 1
ENGL 0101 COMPOSITION I: RHETORIC AND INQUIRY (4)
A writing course taken fall or spring of students' first year that introduces them to the practice of producing texts for different rhetorical occasions. Students use feedback from peers and instructor to strengthen techniques in three stages of the writing process-pre-writing, drafting, and revision-in order to compose rhetorically effective texts for multiple audiences. While summarizing and responding to a range of texts, students learn to situate an original argument within the framework of other speakers, to practice critical inquiry, and to understand conventions associated with a range of rhetorical genres. In addition to writing formally and informally throughout the semester, writers produce a final portfolio whereby they demonstrate, through a variety of projects, meta-cognitive reflection and their ability to incorporate other texts or speakers into their own writing.
STAFF T 11:15 AM-12:05 PM
TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM
BATES 212
BATES 212
4.0 CMP
ENGL 0101-023 (20212) COMPOSITION 1
ENGL 0101 COMPOSITION I: RHETORIC AND INQUIRY (4)
A writing course taken fall or spring of students' first year that introduces them to the practice of producing texts for different rhetorical occasions. Students use feedback from peers and instructor to strengthen techniques in three stages of the writing process-pre-writing, drafting, and revision-in order to compose rhetorically effective texts for multiple audiences. While summarizing and responding to a range of texts, students learn to situate an original argument within the framework of other speakers, to practice critical inquiry, and to understand conventions associated with a range of rhetorical genres. In addition to writing formally and informally throughout the semester, writers produce a final portfolio whereby they demonstrate, through a variety of projects, meta-cognitive reflection and their ability to incorporate other texts or speakers into their own writing.
Starr, E R 03:45 PM-04:35 PM
TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM
BATES 212
BATES 212
4.0 CMP
ENGL 0103-001 (20148) SPEECH
ENGL 0103 SPEECH (3)
A course that gives students an opportunity to practice the fundamental principles of oral communication. It includes experience in organizing and delivering various kinds of talks, participating in group and panel discussions, and evaluating speech habits. Voice quality, articulation, and pronunciation are studied.
STAFF MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM BATES 218 3.0
ENGL 0103-002 (20160) SPEECH
ENGL 0103 SPEECH (3)
A course that gives students an opportunity to practice the fundamental principles of oral communication. It includes experience in organizing and delivering various kinds of talks, participating in group and panel discussions, and evaluating speech habits. Voice quality, articulation, and pronunciation are studied.
STAFF MW 03:10 PM-04:25 PM BATES 218 3.0
ENGL 0103-003 (20958) SPEECH
ENGL 0103 SPEECH (3)
A course that gives students an opportunity to practice the fundamental principles of oral communication. It includes experience in organizing and delivering various kinds of talks, participating in group and panel discussions, and evaluating speech habits. Voice quality, articulation, and pronunciation are studied.
STAFF ONLINE 3.0
ENGL 0103-004 (20248) SPEECH
ENGL 0103 SPEECH (3)
A course that gives students an opportunity to practice the fundamental principles of oral communication. It includes experience in organizing and delivering various kinds of talks, participating in group and panel discussions, and evaluating speech habits. Voice quality, articulation, and pronunciation are studied.
STAFF TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM BATES 223 3.0
ENGL 0103-005 (20252) SPEECH
ENGL 0103 SPEECH (3)
A course that gives students an opportunity to practice the fundamental principles of oral communication. It includes experience in organizing and delivering various kinds of talks, participating in group and panel discussions, and evaluating speech habits. Voice quality, articulation, and pronunciation are studied.
STAFF ONLINE 3.0
ENGL 0105-H01 (21070) HNRS: COMP I
ENGL 0105 COMPOSITION I SEMINAR (HONORS)
(4) An honors-level writing course taken fall or spring of students' first year that introduces them to the practice of producing texts for different rhetorical occasions. Students use feedback from peers and the instructor to strengthen techniques in three stages of the writing process-pre-writing, drafting, and revision-in order to compose rhetorically effective texts for multiple audiences. While summarizing and responding to a range of texts, students learn to situate an original argument within the framework of other speakers, to practice critical inquiry, and to understand conventions associated with a range of rhetorical genres. In addition to writing formally and informally throughout the semester, writers produce a final portfolio whereby they demonstrate, through a variety of projects, metacognitive reflection and their ability to incorporate other texts or speakers into their own writing.
Todd, E M 12:35 PM-01:25 PM
MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM
BATES 22
BATES 22
4.0 CMP
ENGL 0105-H02 (21080) HNRS: COMP I
ENGL 0105 COMPOSITION I SEMINAR (HONORS)
(4) An honors-level writing course taken fall or spring of students' first year that introduces them to the practice of producing texts for different rhetorical occasions. Students use feedback from peers and the instructor to strengthen techniques in three stages of the writing process-pre-writing, drafting, and revision-in order to compose rhetorically effective texts for multiple audiences. While summarizing and responding to a range of texts, students learn to situate an original argument within the framework of other speakers, to practice critical inquiry, and to understand conventions associated with a range of rhetorical genres. In addition to writing formally and informally throughout the semester, writers produce a final portfolio whereby they demonstrate, through a variety of projects, metacognitive reflection and their ability to incorporate other texts or speakers into their own writing.
STAFF M 10:25 AM-11:15 AM
MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM
BATES 223
BATES 223
4.0 CMP
ENGL 0105-H03 (21077) HNRS: COMP I
ENGL 0105 COMPOSITION I SEMINAR (HONORS)
(4) An honors-level writing course taken fall or spring of students' first year that introduces them to the practice of producing texts for different rhetorical occasions. Students use feedback from peers and the instructor to strengthen techniques in three stages of the writing process-pre-writing, drafting, and revision-in order to compose rhetorically effective texts for multiple audiences. While summarizing and responding to a range of texts, students learn to situate an original argument within the framework of other speakers, to practice critical inquiry, and to understand conventions associated with a range of rhetorical genres. In addition to writing formally and informally throughout the semester, writers produce a final portfolio whereby they demonstrate, through a variety of projects, metacognitive reflection and their ability to incorporate other texts or speakers into their own writing.
STAFF T 02:15 PM-03:05 PM
TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM
BATES 111
BATES 111
4.0 CMP
ENGL 0105-H04 (21073) HNRS: COMP I
ENGL 0105 COMPOSITION I SEMINAR (HONORS)
(4) An honors-level writing course taken fall or spring of students' first year that introduces them to the practice of producing texts for different rhetorical occasions. Students use feedback from peers and the instructor to strengthen techniques in three stages of the writing process-pre-writing, drafting, and revision-in order to compose rhetorically effective texts for multiple audiences. While summarizing and responding to a range of texts, students learn to situate an original argument within the framework of other speakers, to practice critical inquiry, and to understand conventions associated with a range of rhetorical genres. In addition to writing formally and informally throughout the semester, writers produce a final portfolio whereby they demonstrate, through a variety of projects, metacognitive reflection and their ability to incorporate other texts or speakers into their own writing.
Diana, V R 03:45 PM-04:35 PM
TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM
BATES 214
BATES 214
4.0 CMP
ENGL 0108-001 (20144) INTRODUCTION TO FILM
ENGL 0108 INTRODUCTION TO FILM (3)
Examines the aesthetic elements of film including cinematography, editing, sound, script, acting, direction, and mise-en-scene. The study of film also may include contexts such as cultural roles, genre, political issues, economics, and history.
Brewster, G MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM WILSN 403 3.0 AAPP
ENGL 0108-002 (21071) INTRODUCTION TO FILM
ENGL 0108 INTRODUCTION TO FILM (3)
Examines the aesthetic elements of film including cinematography, editing, sound, script, acting, direction, and mise-en-scene. The study of film also may include contexts such as cultural roles, genre, political issues, economics, and history.
Brewster, G MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM WILSN 403 3.0 AAPP
ENGL 0112-002 (21232) INTRO TO BLACK AMERICAN LIT
ENGL 0112 INTRODUCTION TO BLACK AMERICAN LITERATURE (3)
Introduces a diverse array of significant works by Black American writers drawn from various genres, regions, and periods and considered in the historical and cultural contexts of the Black experience.� Students will gain a better understanding and appreciation for the diversity and complexity of Black American literary production and cultures.� Students will also practice literary analysis and close reading skills and gain familiarity with foundational critical concepts in Black American literary studies.� Intended for all majors.
Bailey, C TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM BATES 118 3.0 UDIV/LPA
ENGL 0115-001 (21072) INTRO TO NATIVE AMER LIT
ENGL 0115 INTRODUCTION TO NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE (3)
Introduces a diverse array of significant works by Native American writers drawn from various genres, regions, and periods, and tribal nations and considered in the historical and cultural contexts of the Native American experience.� Students will also practice literary analysis and close reading skills and gain familiarity with foundational critical concepts in Native American literary studies.� Intended for all majors.
Diana, V MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM BATES 123 3.0 UDIV/LPA
ENGL 0115-003 (20239) INTRO TO NATIVE AMER LIT
ENGL 0115 INTRODUCTION TO NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE (3)
Introduces a diverse array of significant works by Native American writers drawn from various genres, regions, and periods, and tribal nations and considered in the historical and cultural contexts of the Native American experience.� Students will also practice literary analysis and close reading skills and gain familiarity with foundational critical concepts in Native American literary studies.� Intended for all majors.
Diana, V TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM BATES 214 3.0 UDIV/LPA
ENGL 0204-001 (21233) COMP II: RHETORIC AND RESEARCH PR STAFF MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM BATES 126 3.0
ENGL 0204-002 (21234) COMP II: RHETORIC AND RESEARCH PR Hermansen, P MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM WILSN 138 3.0
ENGL 0204-003 (21235) COMP II: RHETORIC AND RESEARCH PR DiGrazia, J MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM BATES 8 3.0
ENGL 0204-004 (21236) COMP II: RHETORIC AND RESEARCH PR Olander, R TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM WILSN 134 3.0
ENGL 0204-005 (21237) COMP II: RHETORIC AND RESEARCH PR Heim, S TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 3.0
ENGL 0204-006 (21238) COMP II: RHETORIC AND RESEARCH PR Heim, S TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM BATES 223 3.0
ENGL 0204-007 (21287) COMP II: RHETORIC AND RESEARCH PR STAFF TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM BATES 113 3.0
ENGL 0206-001 (20163) PRINCIPLES AND APPL OF GRAMMAR
ENGL 0206 PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATIONS OF GRAMMAR (3)
Designed for students preparing to teach English Language Arts and others seeking a review of language conventions, this class will cover the fundamentals of English grammar, such as sentence types and structure, case and agreement, and the definitions of key terms in the study of language.� Students will also review the conventions of usage, mechanics, and punctuation.� In addition, students who are preparing for careers as teachers will learn pedagogical techniques and best practices for teaching these areas as outlined in national standards, while other students will learn how to become more competent editors of writing.
Hermansen, P MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM ELY 220 3.0
ENGL 0210-001 (20246) BRITISH LIT TO 1780
ENGL 0210 BRITISH LITERATURE TO 1780 (3)
A survey of the literature of the British Isles and Ireland to the nineteenth century in its cultural contexts. Students will read and explore texts such as Beowulf, the Canterbury Tales, Shakespeare sonnets, paradise Lost, and Gulliver's Travels. Literary and intellectual currents if Medieval feudalism, Early Modern humanism, and the Enlightenment will be given significant attention. he early part of the course will be read generally in Early Modern or Modern English.
PR Adams, S MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM BATES 225 3.0 LPA
ENGL 0213-002 (20669) INTRO TO BRITISH LITERATURE
ENGL 0213 INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH LITERATURE (3)
Introduces students to a range of British literary texts representing various genres and time periods. Students develop skills that will enable them to read British literature with greater pleasure and understanding. The interrelations of literature, the arts, and social history receive considerable attention. Course readings may focus on a shared theme(s). Intended for non-English majors, this course does not satisfy English major requirements. English majors should instead take required British literature surveys.
Starr, E W 03:10 PM-04:25 PM
Hybrid
BATES 214 3.0 LPA
ENGL 0213-H01 (21076) HNRS: INTRO TO BRITISH LIT
ENGL 0213 INTRODUCTION TO BRITISH LITERATURE (3)
Introduces students to a range of British literary texts representing various genres and time periods. Students develop skills that will enable them to read British literature with greater pleasure and understanding. The interrelations of literature, the arts, and social history receive considerable attention. Course readings may focus on a shared theme(s). Intended for non-English majors, this course does not satisfy English major requirements. English majors should instead take required British literature surveys.
PR Starr, E W 01:40 PM-02:55 PM BATES 214 3.0 LPA
ENGL 0215-001 (20954) INTRO TO AMERICAN LITERATURE
ENGL 0215 INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN LITERATURE (3)
Introduces students to a range of American literary texts representing various genres and time periods. Students develop skills that will enable them to read American literature with greater pleasure and understanding. The interrelations of literature, the arts, and social history receive considerable attention. Course readings may focus on a shared theme(s). Intended for non-English majors, this course does not satisfy English major requirements. English majors should instead take required American literature surveys.
Brewster, G MWF 12:35 PM-01:25 PM BATES 123 3.0 LPA
ENGL 0215-002 (20145) INTRO TO AMERICAN LITERATURE
ENGL 0215 INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN LITERATURE (3)
Introduces students to a range of American literary texts representing various genres and time periods. Students develop skills that will enable them to read American literature with greater pleasure and understanding. The interrelations of literature, the arts, and social history receive considerable attention. Course readings may focus on a shared theme(s). Intended for non-English majors, this course does not satisfy English major requirements. English majors should instead take required American literature surveys.
Stessel, H TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM BATES 218 3.0 LPA
ENGL 0217-001 (21086) AMERICAN LIT SINCE 1865
ENGL 0217 AMERICAN LITERATURE SINCE 1865 (3)
This survey course introduces students to the expansive range of works comprising American literature from 1865 to the present. Students explore diverse voices, genres, and themes that offer a vision of America�s complex plurality. The course considers literature in relation to such artistic, historical, and cultural topics as regionalism, naturalism, realism, feminism, the Harlem Renaissance, developments in poetry, modernism, postmodernism, experimentation, civil rights movements, ethnic identity, and multiculturalism. Intended for serious students of literature, and required of all English majors.
PR Filas, M TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM BATES 113 3.0 LPA
ENGL 0218-001 (20670) POSTCOLONIAL LIT AND THEORY
ENGL 0218 POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE AND THEORY (3)
This course will serve as an introduction to postcolonial literature and theory and critical race theory. Students will examine literature through the lens of postcolonial and critical race theories, reading in tandem both imaginative literature and secondary scholarship. The course readings will consist of literatures of the Global South (including Asia, Africa, South America, the Caribbean, etc.) and of minority and indigenous writing in the U.S. Students will engage with key critical concepts that may include: diaspora, decolonization, globalization, racial difference, black radical feminism, and intersectionality.
Bailey, C TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM BATES 221 3.0 LPA/GDIV
ENGL 0221-001 (20181) WORLD LIT: FORTUNATE FALL
ENGL 0221 WORLD LITERATURE (3)
This course introduces the diverse yet underrepresented cultures and literatures from at least three geographical locations of the world to initiate a dialog around global understanding of history and human experience.� This course will help students recognize literary figures, texts, themes, and movements within the given historical period(s) under study, identify literary genres and devices, and draw the connections between different themes and ideas presented in literature.� Through a critical study of literary texts, either in English or in translation, this course will establish a foundation to promote intellectual growth by strengthening students' abilities to think analytically and creatively about literature and by developing their sensitivity to cultural diversity.� In addition to interpreting and synthesizing representative texts from different literary traditions, students will practice writing reflectively about literary texts and themes by applying the conventions of academic writing to create an essay that is rhetorically cohesive, sufficiently evidenced, and stylistically sound.� Note: This course can be repeated if the themes and texts are different.� Intended for all majors.
Stessel, H MW 03:10 PM-04:25 PM BATES 225 3.0 LPA/GDIV
ENGL 0221-004 (20451) WORLD LITERATURE
ENGL 0221 WORLD LITERATURE (3)
This course introduces the diverse yet underrepresented cultures and literatures from at least three geographical locations of the world to initiate a dialog around global understanding of history and human experience.� This course will help students recognize literary figures, texts, themes, and movements within the given historical period(s) under study, identify literary genres and devices, and draw the connections between different themes and ideas presented in literature.� Through a critical study of literary texts, either in English or in translation, this course will establish a foundation to promote intellectual growth by strengthening students' abilities to think analytically and creatively about literature and by developing their sensitivity to cultural diversity.� In addition to interpreting and synthesizing representative texts from different literary traditions, students will practice writing reflectively about literary texts and themes by applying the conventions of academic writing to create an essay that is rhetorically cohesive, sufficiently evidenced, and stylistically sound.� Note: This course can be repeated if the themes and texts are different.� Intended for all majors.
STAFF MW 08:15 AM-09:30 AM BATES 111 3.0 LPA/GDIV
ENGL 0221-007 (20256) WORLD LITERATURE
ENGL 0221 WORLD LITERATURE (3)
This course introduces the diverse yet underrepresented cultures and literatures from at least three geographical locations of the world to initiate a dialog around global understanding of history and human experience.� This course will help students recognize literary figures, texts, themes, and movements within the given historical period(s) under study, identify literary genres and devices, and draw the connections between different themes and ideas presented in literature.� Through a critical study of literary texts, either in English or in translation, this course will establish a foundation to promote intellectual growth by strengthening students' abilities to think analytically and creatively about literature and by developing their sensitivity to cultural diversity.� In addition to interpreting and synthesizing representative texts from different literary traditions, students will practice writing reflectively about literary texts and themes by applying the conventions of academic writing to create an essay that is rhetorically cohesive, sufficiently evidenced, and stylistically sound.� Note: This course can be repeated if the themes and texts are different.� Intended for all majors.
Stessel, H TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM BATES 221 3.0 LPA/GDIV
ENGL 0240-001 (20671) CULTURAL STUDIES
ENGL 0240 CULTURAL STUDIES (3)
The study of American culture through the study of various art forms, such as literature, film, music, visual arts, television, and performance in an interdisciplinary context with an emphasis on critical analysis of cultural texts and events from multiple perspectives including differences in race, class, and gender. This course is always offered with a particular focus, such as an historical period, a current topic, or a specific theoretical approach. Issues of formal differences, varied multicultural and multi-ethnic reception, and universal human response are considered as the class acquires a critical vocabulary. Students will also enter the creative process and explore first-hand the different attributes of some of the genres studied.
STAFF ONLINE 3.0 UDIV/AAPP
ENGL 0246-002 (20249) CREATIVE WRITING
ENGL 0246 CREATIVE WRITING (3)
For qualified students interested in identifying and developing their special writing abilities. The techniques of writing fiction, drama, and verse will be studied.
PR Olander, R TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 134 3.0
ENGL 0246-003 (21088) CREATIVE WRITING
ENGL 0246 CREATIVE WRITING (3)
For qualified students interested in identifying and developing their special writing abilities. The techniques of writing fiction, drama, and verse will be studied.
PR Nielsen, L MW 10:25 AM-11:15 AM
Hybrid
BATES 212 3.0
ENGL 0246-004 (21089) CREATIVE WRITING
ENGL 0246 CREATIVE WRITING (3)
For qualified students interested in identifying and developing their special writing abilities. The techniques of writing fiction, drama, and verse will be studied.
PR Nielsen, L MW 09:20 AM-10:10 AM
Hybrid
BATES 22 3.0
ENGL 0285-001 (21078) BASIC FILM WRITING
ENGL 0285 BASICS OF FILM WRITING (3)
This course will introduce students to screenwriting. They first will learn the syntax of film -- the various kinds of shots and how those shots can be combined to create meaning or to tell a story. They will then learn how their own ideas can be transcribed into scripts. They will try their hands at three of the main modes of screenwriting: each student will write a brief documentary, an adaptation, and an original story. Students also will screen and discuss examples of these three kinds of movies.
PR Stessel, H MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM BATES 225 3.0
ENGL 0295-001 (20484) GATEWAY TO ADV LIT STUDY
ENGL 0295 GATEWAY TO ADVANCED LITERARY STUDY (3)
Designed to help prepare students for advanced coursework in literature, this gateway class will situate a critical approach in the context of developments in literary studies; offer advanced instruction in literary research techniques (including formal library instruction); require further practice in close reading strategies, participating in seminar discussions, reading literary criticism and writing about literary texts; and give students the opportunity to work closely with faculty members in their areas of expertise.� Topics vary by semester; this class should be taken in the junior year or second semester of the sophomore year.
PR Starr, E TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM BATES 214 3.0
ENGL 0301-001 (21091) TUTORING WRITING
ENGL 0301 TUTORING WRITING (2-3)
Designed for students from all disciplines, this course will teach students to help their peers - now and in the future - with writing projects. The course will suit those interested in working as tutors or teachers and those interested in pursuing a career that involves writing and/or collaboration. Students will focus on improving their abilities to read, evaluate, and respond verbally to drafts. To this end, students will practice unpacking writing assignments, analyzing texts in different genres and disciplines, and providing feedback to one another. Students will also complete a number of formal and informal writing assignments, such as journal entries, a project proposal, and a research paper. Students enrolled in Tutoring Writing for two credits will not be expected to write the research essay and will complete the course by the first week in November.
Savini, C TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 130 3.0
ENGL 0305-001 (21092) GRANT WRITING
ENGL 0305 GRANT WRITING (3)
This course will examine the rhetorical moves of successful grants on the federal, state, and foundation level in a variety of disciplines to determine how they work to create compelling proposals and powerful projects.� Students will learn how to identify funding sources on the web, how to develop projects, and how to meet a funder's requirements in the text and format of a grant proposal.� Assignments will include short analytical papers, letters of interest, a short corporate or foundation proposal, and a longer state or federal proposal.� Students will learn how to revise proposals to meet a variety of funders' requirements.� This class will be of interest to those who may plan to work in a variety of fields including the sciences, social services, education, the arts, non-profit sectors, and public agencies.
PR STAFF TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM BATES 04 3.0
ENGL 0317-001 (21075) SHAKESPEARE:TRAG. AND HIS
ENGL 0317 SHAKESPEARE: TRAGEDIES AND HISTORIES (3)
A study of the tragedies and histories of Shakespeare, including some consideration of his sources, his use of Elizabethan ideas, and his theatre.
PR Adams, S MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM BATES 225 3.0
ENGL 0322-001 (21093) PRACTICUM SEMINAR: ENGL EDUC
ENGL 0322 PRACTICUM SEMINAR: ENGLISH EDUCATION (2)
Designed to accompany student teachers' semester of practicum in classrooms, the seminar aims to guide students to think about and address daily classroom challenges and questions, larger issues in teaching and learning, as well as to offer support for completing English Education curriculum components needed for graduation and teacher certification.� Seminar� topics will include pedagogy and content, classroom management, unit plan development, assessment, family and community engagement, and professional development. The course models the use of theory intersected with practice as a means to respond, in a more thoughtful way, to current and future teaching.� Required for Secondary Education English students enrolled in practicum.
PR Sarigianides, S M 06:30 PM-08:20 PM BATES 123 2.0
ENGL 0338-001 (20213) YOUNG ADULT LIT IN ELA CLASS
ENGL 0338 YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE IN THE ELA CLASSROOM (3)
This course prepares students for a career as a middle and/or secondary school English teacher, and focuses on the reading and teaching of young adult literature.� Topics addressed include ideas about adolescents and their learning practices; analysis of texts from a range of young adult genres; methods for teaching young adult literature; lesson and unit design.
Sarigianides, S M 04:00 PM-06:25 PM BATES 123 3.0
ENGL 0346-002 (20677) WRITING POETRY
ENGL 0346 WRITING POETRY (3)
For students interested in practicing the craft of poetry. This course emphasizes the importance of foundational skills and builds on the collaborative workshop and revision processes students learn in ENGL 0246; it also introduces the publication submissions process. As a way to encourage students to become responsible literary citizens, the course emphasizes the importance of reading contemporary poetry widely and of sharing work in public spaces.
PR Nielsen, L TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM BATES 218 3.0
ENGL 0347-001 (21096) ADVANCED CRITICAL WRITING
ENGL 0347 ADVANCED CRITICAL WRITING (3)
Designed to develop formal writing ability on scholarly topics. Intensive library research will precede all writings. The goal of the course is to provide students with the research and writing skills necessary in the preparation of papers of publishable quality.
PR DiGrazia, J MWF 12:35 PM-01:25 PM BATES 118 3.0
ENGL 0350-001 (20214) METHODS TCHNG ENG-MID/SEC SCH
ENGL 0350 METHODS OF TEACHING ENGLISH IN THE SECONDARY AND/OR MIDDLE SCHOOL (3)
This course prepares students for a career as a middle and/or secondary school English teacher.� The course features theories and practice focused on: teaching strategies in speaking, reading, writing, and listening; lesson and unit design; incorporating students' diverse backgrounds into curriculum design and implementation; differentiating to support and to challenge students; assessment techniques; presentation of lessons; collaborating with peers and colleagues; reflection on practice.� A 30-hour field experience in an approved middle or high school are required for this course.
Sarigianides, S W 04:30 PM-07:15 PM BATES 123 3.0
ENGL 0380-001 (21547) INTERNSHIP IN ENGLISH
ENGL 0380 INTERNSHIP IN ENGLISH (3-12)
A practical internship program for senior English majors who want to gain real experience in on-the-job training such as theatre, television, radio, report writing, news writing, insurance underwriting, education, editing, public relations, and advertising. Students will participate for a stipulated period under professional supervision and will be observed periodically by college faculty.
Filas, M
ENGL 0381-001 (21098) ADVANCED PROSE WRITING
ENGL 0381 ADVANCED PROSE WRITING (3)
This course is an advanced workshop in writing, revising, and submitting for publication a substantial project in prose.� Options include: novella, memoir, a collection of short stories or creative nonfiction.� this course will emphasize how to compose and market a cohesive collection and develop a distinct signature voice.� Special emphasis will be given to developing themes through the exploration of prose elements such as symbolism, plot development, and transformation.� A deeper consideration of narrative form and voice is also made possible by the diversity of forms the class can choose from for their semester-long projects.� The class is structured as a studio workshop with mandatory individual conferences with the professor.� Requirements include a public reading from the projects and submission of work for publication in nationally distributed literary journals and presses.
PR Filas, M TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM BATES 8 3.0
ENGL 0392-001 (20135) BUS AND TECH WRITING
ENGL 0392 BUSINESS AND TECHNICAL WRITING (3)
How to write more powerfully, persuasively, and successfully in business. Students will learn the strategies of writing clear and effective memos, letters, and reports, and easy techniques for using tables and graphs. By the end of the course the student will have a portfolio of writing samples to demonstrate writing skills.
Neikirk, G ONLINE 3.0
ENGL 0392-002 (20136) BUS AND TECH WRITING
ENGL 0392 BUSINESS AND TECHNICAL WRITING (3)
How to write more powerfully, persuasively, and successfully in business. Students will learn the strategies of writing clear and effective memos, letters, and reports, and easy techniques for using tables and graphs. By the end of the course the student will have a portfolio of writing samples to demonstrate writing skills.
Neikirk, G ONLINE 3.0
ENGL 0392-003 (20678) BUS AND TECH WRITING
ENGL 0392 BUSINESS AND TECHNICAL WRITING (3)
How to write more powerfully, persuasively, and successfully in business. Students will learn the strategies of writing clear and effective memos, letters, and reports, and easy techniques for using tables and graphs. By the end of the course the student will have a portfolio of writing samples to demonstrate writing skills.
Neikirk, G ONLINE 3.0
ENGL 0392-004 (20255) BUS AND TECH WRITING
ENGL 0392 BUSINESS AND TECHNICAL WRITING (3)
How to write more powerfully, persuasively, and successfully in business. Students will learn the strategies of writing clear and effective memos, letters, and reports, and easy techniques for using tables and graphs. By the end of the course the student will have a portfolio of writing samples to demonstrate writing skills.
Adams, S T 09:45 AM-11:00 AM
Hybrid
BATES 3.0
ENGL 0392-006 (21102) BUS AND TECH WRITING
ENGL 0392 BUSINESS AND TECHNICAL WRITING (3)
How to write more powerfully, persuasively, and successfully in business. Students will learn the strategies of writing clear and effective memos, letters, and reports, and easy techniques for using tables and graphs. By the end of the course the student will have a portfolio of writing samples to demonstrate writing skills.
STAFF MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM BATES 8 3.0
ENGL 0397-001 (20679) ST: GRAPHIC NARRATIVE
ENGL 0397 SPECIAL TOPICS IN LITERATURE (3)
Focuses on a specific period, genre, writer, or group of writers, chosen in keeping with the instructor�s field of specialization and in response to student interest.
PR Chen, B MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM BATES 22 3.0
Environmental Science
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
ENVS 0101-001 (20035) PRINC OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCI
ENVS 0101 PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (3)
This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary topics and techniques of Environmental Science including the scientific method, ecology, the human population, resources use, pollution, climate change, and others.
Szerlag, K MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM WILSN 207 3.0 ASCI
ENVS 0101-002 (20036) PRINC OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCI
ENVS 0101 PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (3)
This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary topics and techniques of Environmental Science including the scientific method, ecology, the human population, resources use, pollution, climate change, and others.
Szerlag, K MWF 12:35 PM-01:25 PM WILSN 207 3.0 ASCI
ENVS 0101-H01 (20545) HNRS:PRINC OF ENVRNMNTL SCI
ENVS 0101 PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (3)
This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary topics and techniques of Environmental Science including the scientific method, ecology, the human population, resources use, pollution, climate change, and others.
DiCarlo, L TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM WILSN 221 3.0 ASCI
ENVS 0105-001 (20037) NATURAL HIST AND FIELD TECHNIQUES
ENVS 0105 NATURAL HISTORY AND FIELD TECHNIQUES (3)
This course will introduce students to natural history through field and lecture-based instruction focusing on the Northeastern U.S.� Students will learn to identify common plant and wildlife species, understand basic geography and land-use history, and understand the relationships among the various natural and human-altered habitats on the landscape.� Students will gain hands-on exposure to the tools and techniques for sampling the environment including the use of compasses and global positioning system devices to navigate the landscape.
McDonald, J T 12:45 PM-03:35 PM SCI 113 3.0
ENVS 0105-002 (20038) NATURAL HIST AND FIELD TECHNIQUES
ENVS 0105 NATURAL HISTORY AND FIELD TECHNIQUES (3)
This course will introduce students to natural history through field and lecture-based instruction focusing on the Northeastern U.S.� Students will learn to identify common plant and wildlife species, understand basic geography and land-use history, and understand the relationships among the various natural and human-altered habitats on the landscape.� Students will gain hands-on exposure to the tools and techniques for sampling the environment including the use of compasses and global positioning system devices to navigate the landscape.
McDonald, J R 12:45 PM-03:35 PM SCI 113 3.0
ENVS 0105-003 (20865) NATURAL HIST AND FIELD TECHNIQUES
ENVS 0105 NATURAL HISTORY AND FIELD TECHNIQUES (3)
This course will introduce students to natural history through field and lecture-based instruction focusing on the Northeastern U.S.� Students will learn to identify common plant and wildlife species, understand basic geography and land-use history, and understand the relationships among the various natural and human-altered habitats on the landscape.� Students will gain hands-on exposure to the tools and techniques for sampling the environment including the use of compasses and global positioning system devices to navigate the landscape.
DiCarlo, L T 09:45 AM-12:30 PM SCI 113 3.0
ENVS 0180-001 (20040) INTRO ENVIRONMENTAL SCI SEM
ENVS 0180 INTRODUCTORY ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE SEMINAR (1)
This seminar introduces Environmental Science students to the theory and practice of environmental science.� Students will examine the interdisciplinary approach used to address environmental issues.� Critical thinking, mathematical literacy, and communication skills required for the study of environmental science will be emphasized.� The Department of Environmental Science major objectives and assessment process will be introduced.
Vorwerk, M T 12:45 PM-02:00 PM WILSN 207 1.0
ENVS 0180-002 (20041) INTRO ENVIRONMENTAL SCI SEM
ENVS 0180 INTRODUCTORY ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE SEMINAR (1)
This seminar introduces Environmental Science students to the theory and practice of environmental science.� Students will examine the interdisciplinary approach used to address environmental issues.� Critical thinking, mathematical literacy, and communication skills required for the study of environmental science will be emphasized.� The Department of Environmental Science major objectives and assessment process will be introduced.
Vorwerk, M R 12:45 PM-02:00 PM WILSN 207 1.0
ENVS 0216-001 (21249) PILOT: PLANT COMMUNITIES AND F
ENVS 0216 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (1-4)
This course offers an in-depth study of a specialized area within the envrionmental sciences. Course content will vary according to the area of specialization of the instructor and the interests of the students. May be repeated if course content differs.
Lovejoy, D M 01:40 PM-04:30 PM WILSN 223 3.0
ENVS 0216-002 (21280) ST: NATURE AND ENVS WELLNESS
ENVS 0216 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (1-4)
This course offers an in-depth study of a specialized area within the envrionmental sciences. Course content will vary according to the area of specialization of the instructor and the interests of the students. May be repeated if course content differs.
Parshall, T MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM WILSN 207 3.0
ENVS 0233-001 (20043) ENVIRONMENTAL LEGISLATION
ENVS 0233 ENVIRONMENTAL LEGISLATION (3)
A detailed examination of the need for, and biological basis for, the standards established by existing, or proposed, federal and state legislation. The lectures, which will deal with topics such as the National Environment Policy Act and the Water Pollution Control Act, will be supplemented by analysis and discussion of environmental impact statements and court decision dealing with each of the topics covered.
PR Parshall, T TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM WILSN 221 3.0
ENVS 0240-001 (20044) WRITING FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SCI
ENVS 0240 WRITING FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (3)
This course is designed to develop skills in reading, evaluating, writing, and communicating scientific and technical concepts in a variety of formats such as scientific research papers, proposals, professional reports, professional letters and memos, oral and poster presentations, and science news stories.� Students will have opportunities to evaluate good models of written documents and scientific presentations as well as share and evaluate the work of other students.
PR Leigh, K TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 207 3.0
ENVS 0251-001 (20546) WATER RESRCE PLN.MGMT WATERSHD
ENVS 0251 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT (4)
This course focuses on societies' management of water resources. Students a will develop an understanding of the diverse water issues affecting people on local, regional, and global scales. The lab portion will include topics such as field sampling of water flow and water quality. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.
PR Vorwerk, M W 09:20 AM-12:10 PM
MWF 12:35 PM-01:25 PM
SCI 113
SCI 113
4.0
ENVS 0255-001 (20046) ENVIRONMENTAL SOIL SCIENCE
ENVS 0255 ENVIRONMENTAL SOIL SCIENCE (4)
In this hands-on lab and lecture course students will learn the principles of soil in the context of environmental science - soil formation, soil chemical and physical attributes, the soil ecosystems, soil and food security, soil contamination and remediation and soil management practices to limit degradation and erosion.� Lab activities may include evaluation of soil horizons, analysis of local soil resources, and investigation into management practices.
Szerlag, K R 09:45 AM-12:30 PM
MW 03:10 PM-04:30 PM
SCI 113
WILSN 207
4.0
ENVS 0300-001 (20707) WETLANDS ASSESSMENT/PLANNING
ENVS 0300 WETLANDS ASSESSMENT AND PLANNING (4)
This course is designed to learn about wetland functions and values and to give an overview of federal, state, and municipal environmental laws with specific focus on wetlands.� Students will learn wetland identification using hydrology, hydric soils, and hydrophytic vegetation following DEP�methods.� Lectures will focus on wetland functions, values, regulatory jurisdiction, and developmental rights and restrictions.� labs will emphasize field techniques using DEP protocols to identify, delineate, and permit activities in jurisdictional areas as well as field trips to wetlands and areas undergoing development.� A research project is required.
PR Leigh, K F 09:20 AM-12:10 PM
TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM
SCI 113
WILSN 207
4.0
ENVS 0309-001 (20480) WILDLIFE ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMNT
ENVS 0309 WILDLIFE ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT (4)
This course will provide an overview of the history of wildlife management in the United States and focus on common wildlife management concepts, techniques, and issues.� Students will learn about techniques for determining sex and age of wildlife species, understand common population estimation methods including non-invasive methods, learn about the management of game and non-game species, and learn techniques for assessing wildlife species use of habitats, with a focus on Northeastern U.S. species and habitats.� Laboratory sessions will include surveys for animal sign, introduction to radiotelemetry, trapping methods, and visits to local management areas.� Students will conduct an independent research project that can be field-based or have a service learning component and will prepare a scientific-journal style report.
PR McDonald, J M 01:40 PM-04:30 PM
TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM
SCI 113
WILSN 207
4.0
ENVS 0341-001 (20708) ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION
ENVS 0341 ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION (4)
This course will address the fundamentals of successfully restoring and reclaiming disturbed landscapes and ecosystems.� Topics will include assessment of site conditions; determining restoration goals and feasibility; hydrologic, biotic, and soil functions and their importance in restoration; and measure of successful restoration.� Students will develop critical thinking skills and hands-on experience in the application of ecological principles to restoration.
PR DiCarlo, L W 01:40 PM-04:25 PM
TR 08:15 AM-09:30 AM
SCI 113
SCI 113
4.0
ENVS 0390-001 (20047) ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE SR. SEM.
ENVS 0390 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE SENIOR SEMINAR (3)
This seminar will be conducted by members of the Geography,� Planning and Sustainability and Biology departments and will include guest lectures. It will focus on environmental issues, applied methods and skills, the interdisciplinary nature of environmental science, methods of inquiry and present trends. Each student is supervised by a faculty member and expected to formulate and develop a research project that addresses a particular environmental problem. Independent research is conducted by collecting and analyzing data and recommending alternatives and solutions to the environmental problem. The research will be presented to the full class, evaluated by faculty and juried by outside reviewers at the end of the semester.
Parshall, T M 09:20 AM-12:10 PM SCI 113 3.0
Ethnic and Gender Studies
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
EGST 0101-001 (20955) INTRO TO COMP ETHNIC STUDIES
EGST 0101 INTRODUCTION TO COMPARATIVE ETHNIC STUDIES (3)
This course focuses on the meaning and significance of race, ethnicity and culture in the United States. Students will be exposed to basic concepts in ethnic studies such as ethnicity, culture, race, socialization, cultural assimilation, acculturation, migration, immigration, social protest, and resistance. This course will be taught from an interdisciplinary perspective, thereby allowing students to build a base from various viewpoints and methodologies including but not limited to historical, cultural, political, economic, and sociological.
Judge, E MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM BATES 212 3.0 UDIV
EGST 0101-002 (21500) INTRO TO COMP ETHNIC STUDIES
EGST 0101 INTRODUCTION TO COMPARATIVE ETHNIC STUDIES (3)
This course focuses on the meaning and significance of race, ethnicity and culture in the United States. Students will be exposed to basic concepts in ethnic studies such as ethnicity, culture, race, socialization, cultural assimilation, acculturation, migration, immigration, social protest, and resistance. This course will be taught from an interdisciplinary perspective, thereby allowing students to build a base from various viewpoints and methodologies including but not limited to historical, cultural, political, economic, and sociological.
Hennessy, M ONLINE 3.0 UDIV
EGST 0101-003 (20182) INTRO TO COMP ETHNIC STUDIES
EGST 0101 INTRODUCTION TO COMPARATIVE ETHNIC STUDIES (3)
This course focuses on the meaning and significance of race, ethnicity and culture in the United States. Students will be exposed to basic concepts in ethnic studies such as ethnicity, culture, race, socialization, cultural assimilation, acculturation, migration, immigration, social protest, and resistance. This course will be taught from an interdisciplinary perspective, thereby allowing students to build a base from various viewpoints and methodologies including but not limited to historical, cultural, political, economic, and sociological.
Robinson, C MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM REMSYC 3.0 UDIV
EGST 0101-005 (20185) INTRO TO COMP ETHNIC STUDIES
EGST 0101 INTRODUCTION TO COMPARATIVE ETHNIC STUDIES (3)
This course focuses on the meaning and significance of race, ethnicity and culture in the United States. Students will be exposed to basic concepts in ethnic studies such as ethnicity, culture, race, socialization, cultural assimilation, acculturation, migration, immigration, social protest, and resistance. This course will be taught from an interdisciplinary perspective, thereby allowing students to build a base from various viewpoints and methodologies including but not limited to historical, cultural, political, economic, and sociological.
Judge, E TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM WILSN 138 3.0 UDIV
EGST 0102-004 (20184) INTRO WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES
EGST 0102 INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN�S AND GENDER STUDIES (3)
Introduces students to the scholarship and research developed Women�s and Gender Studies. The course will address a variety of issues in the field in an interdisciplinary format, generally focusing on the social construction of gender and women�s lives and experiences as illuminated by the social sciences and humanities. The course will be taught with a global comparative perspective allowing students to examine women�s experiences and the politics of gender with a wide international lens.
Rajgopal, S MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM WILSN 404 3.0 GDIV
EGST 0102-008 (21141) INTRO WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES
EGST 0102 INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN�S AND GENDER STUDIES (3)
Introduces students to the scholarship and research developed Women�s and Gender Studies. The course will address a variety of issues in the field in an interdisciplinary format, generally focusing on the social construction of gender and women�s lives and experiences as illuminated by the social sciences and humanities. The course will be taught with a global comparative perspective allowing students to examine women�s experiences and the politics of gender with a wide international lens.
Rajgopal, S TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 138 3.0 GDIV
EGST 0102-009 (21140) INTRO WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES
EGST 0102 INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN�S AND GENDER STUDIES (3)
Introduces students to the scholarship and research developed Women�s and Gender Studies. The course will address a variety of issues in the field in an interdisciplinary format, generally focusing on the social construction of gender and women�s lives and experiences as illuminated by the social sciences and humanities. The course will be taught with a global comparative perspective allowing students to examine women�s experiences and the politics of gender with a wide international lens.
Robinson, C TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM WILSN 304 3.0 GDIV
EGST 0102-H01 (20186) HNRS: INTRO WOMEN'S AND GENDER
EGST 0102 INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN�S AND GENDER STUDIES (3)
Introduces students to the scholarship and research developed Women�s and Gender Studies. The course will address a variety of issues in the field in an interdisciplinary format, generally focusing on the social construction of gender and women�s lives and experiences as illuminated by the social sciences and humanities. The course will be taught with a global comparative perspective allowing students to examine women�s experiences and the politics of gender with a wide international lens.
Conant, T TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 317 3.0 GDIV
EGST 0216-001 (21143) DEVIANCE AND CULTURE
EGST 0216 DEVIANCE AND CULTURE (3)
Studies individual deviants and 'misfits' both within and outside the United States who have defied their culture's norms and/or value systems. This course will focus specifically on deviance and stigma, with great emphasis on economic 'untouchables' who are denied work, social status, and belonging due to race, gender, ethnicity, class, sexuality, religion and ability.
Stassinos, E MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM WILSN 401 3.0 UDIV
EGST 0220-001 (20785) RELIGION, GENDER AND SOCIETY
EGST 0220 RELIGION. GENDER AND SOCIETY (3)
Examines the intersection of contemporary feminisms with the multicultural American religious landscape. Particular attention to issues of race, class, multiple identities, and the shaping of public discourse.
Rajgopal, S MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM WILSN 403 3.0 UDIV
EGST 0221-001 (21142) WOMEN IN MODERN ORGANIZATIONS
EGST 0221 WOMEN IN MODERN ORGANIZATIONS (3)
An interdisciplinary approach to the policy questions and social tensions created by the entrance of women as full participants in modern organizational life. Attention to the social, political, ethical, and professional problems faced by women in organizations and to the stresses placed on traditional organizational cultures by demand for gender equal policies. Special emphasis on analyses and strategies aimed at successful critique, problem-solving and professional achievement within such institutions. Topics vary by semester.
Rajgopal, S TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM WILSN 134 3.0 UDIV
EGST 0225-001 (21144) INSTITUTIONAL RACISM
EGST 0225 INSTITUTIONAL RACISM IN THE U.S. (3)
This course will examine the historical basis of racial themes and attitudes in the U.S., analyze racist manifestation extant within contemporary institutions and propose some strategies for action which might lend themselves to easing and eventually eradicating the problem. Additionally, we will present selected theoretical frameworks or �analytical models� that have been developed � some of which have actually fanned the flames of racism more than subdued it � to help provide students with a kid of graphic understanding of racial phenomena. Lastly, the terminal course objective will be synthesis of class learning and your own invaluable personal perspective in the form of a final paper or project based on your research and evaluation of a particular U.S. institution.
PR Ali, A TR 02:00 PM-03:30 PM BATES 210 3.0
EGST 0305-001 (21494) DE-COLONIAL BLACK FEMINISMS
EGST 0305 CRITICAL RACE STUDIES (3)
le disciplinary approaches within the emerging field of critical race studies. The course will interrogate the construction of �race� as a legal, institutional and social construction and explore the impact of that construction over different historical periods for different populations. Possible exploration may include the social construction of whiteness, perspectives on institutional racism in the United States, the development and impact of critical race theory in places such as Australia particularly in reference to the Indigenous populations and Europe in relation to the immigrant populations. Topics may vary by semester. Course can be taken more than once if topic is different.
PR Hennessy, M R 04:00 PM-06:30 PM BATES 223 3.0
EGST 0390-001 (21548) IS: RACE, CLASS , GENDER JUSTI
EGST 0390 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ETHNIC AND GENDER STUDIES (3)
An advanced course offers a variety of topics with a myriad of perspectives and foci. Course offerings may include explorations of particular research areas in ethnic and gender studies from content based analysis to theoretical explorations. Course may be repeated to fulfill multiple thematic areas in the EGST Major
PR Rajgopal, S 3.0
General Academic Program
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
ELEC 9998-C01 (21565) CCGS: NATL SECURITY LEADERSHIP STAFF 3.0
ELEC 9998-C02 (21566) CCGS: ADV PHYSICAL CONDITIONIN STAFF 1.0
Geog, Planning Sustainability
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
GPS 0101-001 (20612) WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY
GPS 0101 WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY (3)
Within a world regional context, the course offers an examination of the patterns and underlying processes comprising both the human and natural realms of geography. Course content deals with the earth, places, people, the natural environment, human-environmental interaction, and the movement of people, goods, and ideas. Special emphasis is given to achieving a degree of literacy in world locations and developing map interpretation skills. The course also introduces various topical specializations in geography such as economic geography, political geography, population geography, physiography, and urban geography.
LeDoux, T MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM WILSN 404 3.0 SOCU
GPS 0101-003 (20959) WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY
GPS 0101 WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY (3)
Within a world regional context, the course offers an examination of the patterns and underlying processes comprising both the human and natural realms of geography. Course content deals with the earth, places, people, the natural environment, human-environmental interaction, and the movement of people, goods, and ideas. Special emphasis is given to achieving a degree of literacy in world locations and developing map interpretation skills. The course also introduces various topical specializations in geography such as economic geography, political geography, population geography, physiography, and urban geography.
Neog, D TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM WILSN 138 3.0 SOCU
GPS 0101-004 (20615) WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY
GPS 0101 WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY (3)
Within a world regional context, the course offers an examination of the patterns and underlying processes comprising both the human and natural realms of geography. Course content deals with the earth, places, people, the natural environment, human-environmental interaction, and the movement of people, goods, and ideas. Special emphasis is given to achieving a degree of literacy in world locations and developing map interpretation skills. The course also introduces various topical specializations in geography such as economic geography, political geography, population geography, physiography, and urban geography.
LeDoux, T ONLINE 3.0 SOCU
GPS 0102-001 (20616) PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY
GPS 0102 PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY (4)
Physical Geography is the study of the spatial variations of the physical phenomena on the surface of the Earth. It focuses on the geo-systems of the Earth, including the four major 'spheres': Atmosphere (weather, climatology); Lithosphere (landforms); Hydrosphere (water resources); and Biosphere (flora, fauna). The human-environmental interaction is emphasized. Laboratory and field experiments will explore the various spheres of the Earth and include map interpretation, remote sensing analysis, atmospheric studies, geomorphology investigation, and other human-environment interactions.
Braun, C MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM WILSN 130 4.0 LSCI
GPS 0102-002 (21132) PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY W/LAB
GPS 0102 PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY (4)
Physical Geography is the study of the spatial variations of the physical phenomena on the surface of the Earth. It focuses on the geo-systems of the Earth, including the four major 'spheres': Atmosphere (weather, climatology); Lithosphere (landforms); Hydrosphere (water resources); and Biosphere (flora, fauna). The human-environmental interaction is emphasized. Laboratory and field experiments will explore the various spheres of the Earth and include map interpretation, remote sensing analysis, atmospheric studies, geomorphology investigation, and other human-environment interactions.
Fitzgerald, S ONLINE 4.0 LSCI
GPS 0105-001 (20620) INTRO TO COMMUNITY PLANNING
GPS 0105 INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNITY PLANNING (3)
This course examines the history of planning, planning theory, and the specialty areas of planning including physical, social and economic planning. Students learn to identify urban and environmental planning problems, apply specific tools to solve the problems, and develop master plans. Topics covered include land preservation strategies, innovative zoning techniques for affordable housing, economic revitalization techniques, and grant-writing skills.
Ndegeah, S MW 03:10 PM-04:25 PM
First-Year COURSE
3.0 SOCU
GPS 0105-003 (20622) INTRO COMMUNITY PLANNING
GPS 0105 INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNITY PLANNING (3)
This course examines the history of planning, planning theory, and the specialty areas of planning including physical, social and economic planning. Students learn to identify urban and environmental planning problems, apply specific tools to solve the problems, and develop master plans. Topics covered include land preservation strategies, innovative zoning techniques for affordable housing, economic revitalization techniques, and grant-writing skills.
Neog, D ONLINE 3.0 SOCU
GPS 0105-H01 (21137) HNRS: INTRO TO COMMUNITY PLANN
GPS 0105 INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNITY PLANNING (3)
This course examines the history of planning, planning theory, and the specialty areas of planning including physical, social and economic planning. Students learn to identify urban and environmental planning problems, apply specific tools to solve the problems, and develop master plans. Topics covered include land preservation strategies, innovative zoning techniques for affordable housing, economic revitalization techniques, and grant-writing skills.
Neog, D TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM WILSN 202 3.0 SOCU
GPS 0106-002 (21135) ENVIR., SUSTAIN. AND SOCIETY
GPS 0106 ENVIR., SUBSTAIN. AND SOCIETY (3)
This course provides an introduction to human environment relationships and the scientific, literary, and philosophical foundations of environmental thought and sustainability science.� The course involves the exploration of major currents in environmental thought, in their changing geographical and historical contexts, in order to better understand the application of sustainability science to major environmental concerns including population and scarcity, urbanization, food systems, biodiversity loss, soil degradation, water resources, pollution, energy issues and climate change, among others.� Special attention is given to the specific social, cultural, political, economic and eco-regional contexts which condition environmental problem solving and sustainability science's contributions to public discourse.�� The complexity and coevolution of human and environmental systems, and the ethical tensions that characterize the search for sustainable solutions at diverse scales are also emphasized.
Lally, M TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM BATES 111 3.0 LPA/ASCI
GPS 0107-002 (21134) CLIMATE CHANGE
GPS 0107 CLIMATE CHANGE (3)
An examination of our climate systems, including the physics of the greenhouse effect and mechanisms/forcings, both natural and human, of climate change.� The second part of the course focuses on climate change observed in the past, today, and in the future, including methods of past climate reconstruction and future climate prediction.� The third part of the course extends the discussion beyond the scientific basis and into questions of impacts, vulnerabilities, and possible adaptation/mitigation strategies.
Braun, C MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM WILSN 202 3.0 ASCI
GPS 0210-001 (20624) CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY
GPS 0210 CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY (3)
An examination of the world's major geographic realms, focusing on characteristics such as language, religion, population growth, and national development which give identity to these realms and often spawn conflict between realms.
Ndegeah, S TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM WILSN 211 3.0 GDIV
GPS 0210-002 (20625) CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY
GPS 0210 CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY (3)
An examination of the world's major geographic realms, focusing on characteristics such as language, religion, population growth, and national development which give identity to these realms and often spawn conflict between realms.
Ndegeah, S TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM WILSN 211 3.0 GDIV
GPS 0216-001 (20626) THE (UN)JUST CITY
GPS 0216 THE (UN)
JUST CITY (3) This course asks students to think criticially about urban social relations and gain an understanding of social justice, inequality, access, and privledge as they relate to urban space.� It explores how identity, power, and space create different understandings of cities.� It also highlights the roles of race, class, gender, and ethnicity in shaping urban geography.� The course challenges students to interrogate representations and conceptualizations of cities and to think critically about urban space.
Gross, A R 12:45 PM-03:15 PM BATES 05 3.0
GPS 0222-001 (20798) SITE PLANNING STUDIO
GPS 0222 SITE PLANNING STUDIO (3)
An introduction to the geography of site and locational analysis. Students are presented with case studies involving the best locations for various types of facilities, including business, residential, and institutional uses. Students complete projects involving urban form and site design.
Neog, D W 03:10 PM-05:40 PM WILSN 202 3.0
GPS 0225-001 (20799) LEGAL ISS.IN ZONING AND PLANNING
GPS 0225 LEGAL ISSUES IN ZONING AND PLANNING (3)
This course provides an overview of the land use/law field by introducing the student to the highlights of the history of zoning, and the impacts of courts case law on land use development decisions. The student will learn how to interpret and prepare land use court case review. Specific topics of the course include: how constitutional law governs land use decision making; the impacts of police power, eminent domain, and aesthetic controls on planning practice; and the effects of exclusionary practices on zoning districts.
PR Gross, A TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM BATES 05 3.0
GPS 0244-001 (20629) INTRO TO GEOGRAPHIC INFO SYST
GPS 0244 INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)
provides the fundamental background of a GIS. Students will be introduced to the basic computer skills, map interpretation, and structure of digital graphic databases necessary to develop a GIS. Open to all majors this course trains students to think 'Geographically' for a variety of disciplines and to apply these skills in the analysis of real life problems. The course will blend lecture with applied computer labs to learn how to analyze the world.
Braun, C MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM WILSN 202A 3.0
GPS 0244-002 (20630) INTRO TO GEOGRAPHIC INFO SYST
GPS 0244 INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)
provides the fundamental background of a GIS. Students will be introduced to the basic computer skills, map interpretation, and structure of digital graphic databases necessary to develop a GIS. Open to all majors this course trains students to think 'Geographically' for a variety of disciplines and to apply these skills in the analysis of real life problems. The course will blend lecture with applied computer labs to learn how to analyze the world.
LeDoux, T MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM WILSN 202A 3.0
GPS 0246-001 (20631) QUANT MTHDS SOCIAL/PHYS SCIE
GPS 0246 QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR SOCIAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCE (3)
Introduces students to a variety of statistical methods used in research across the social and physical science realms with emphasis primarily upon applications rather than theory. The class is taught in the computer laboratory, with class time divided between lectures and computer-based exercises. Topics include data measurement levels, measures of central tendency and dispersion, frequency distributions, cross-tabulations, hypothesis testing, chi-square analyses, t-tests, regression, and bivariate and multiple correlation.
LeDoux, T MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM WILSN 202A 3.0 ARSN
GPS 0251-001 (20702) WATER RESRCE PLN/MGMT WTRSHED
GPS 0251 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT (4)
This course focuses on societies' management of water resources. Students will develop an understanding of the diverse water issues affecting people on local, regional, and global scales. The lab portion will include topics such as field sampling of water flow and water quality. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.
PR Vorwerk, M W 09:20 AM-12:10 PM
MWF 12:35 PM-01:25 PM
SCI 113
SCI 113
4.0
GPS 0317-001 (21250) ST: SITE PLANNING LAB
GPS 0317 SPECIAL TOPICS IN GEOGRAPHY AND PLANNING (1-4)
An in-depth study of a limited or specialized area within Geography and Regional Planning. Course content will vary according to the area of specialization of the instructor and the interests of the students. May be repeated if course content differs.
STAFF F 09:20 AM-10:10 AM WILSN 202A 1.0
GPS 0344-001 (21138) ADV. GEOGRAPHICAL INFO. SYSTEM
GPS 0344 ADVANCED GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)
Advanced GIS is an advanced course which provides students with the techniques for the spatial analysis of humans in the Earth's environment. Included assignments will explore digital data collection and encoding, spatial analysis, visual interpretation, and graphic output.
PR STAFF TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 202A 3.0
Health Sciences
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
GERO 0101-001 (21277) INTRO TO GERONTOLOGY
GERO 0101 INTRODUCTION TO GERONTOLOGY (3)
An introduction to the societal and cultural factors which impact aging individuals.� Explains the interrelatedness of social, psychological, and physical aging.� Topics to be covered include, but are not limited to, societal and biological theories of aging, societal and individual consequences of demographic changes in an aging society, current issues in social gerontology, and aging.
Smith, T MWF 09:00 AM-09:50 AM
Hybrid
BATES 117 3.0 SOCU
GERO 0101-002 (21302) INTRO TO GERONTOLOGY
GERO 0101 INTRODUCTION TO GERONTOLOGY (3)
An introduction to the societal and cultural factors which impact aging individuals.� Explains the interrelatedness of social, psychological, and physical aging.� Topics to be covered include, but are not limited to, societal and biological theories of aging, societal and individual consequences of demographic changes in an aging society, current issues in social gerontology, and aging.
Smith, T ONLINE 3.0 SOCU
HESC 0101-001 (20439) INTRO TO HEALTH CARE PRACTICE
HESC 0101 INTRODUCTION TO THE HEALTH CARE PRACTICE (3)
This course will be the introduction to the Health Sciences major.� The goal of this course is to introduce students to different health professions and to develop the literacy and communication skills needed for health professions in a team-based, patient-centered healthcare system.� During this course the students will be required to engage in, through active observation and reflection, a variety of health professions.
Smith, T TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM
Hybrid
BATES 22 3.0
HESC 0101-002 (20578) INTRO TO HEALTH CARE PRACTICE
HESC 0101 INTRODUCTION TO THE HEALTH CARE PRACTICE (3)
This course will be the introduction to the Health Sciences major.� The goal of this course is to introduce students to different health professions and to develop the literacy and communication skills needed for health professions in a team-based, patient-centered healthcare system.� During this course the students will be required to engage in, through active observation and reflection, a variety of health professions.
St. Pierre, B T 11:15 AM-12:30 PM
Hybrid
BATES 22 3.0
HESC 0101-003 (20579) INTRO TO HEALTH CARE PRACTICE
HESC 0101 INTRODUCTION TO THE HEALTH CARE PRACTICE (3)
This course will be the introduction to the Health Sciences major.� The goal of this course is to introduce students to different health professions and to develop the literacy and communication skills needed for health professions in a team-based, patient-centered healthcare system.� During this course the students will be required to engage in, through active observation and reflection, a variety of health professions.
St. Pierre, B T 03:45 PM-05:15 PM
Hybrid
BATES 22 3.0
HESC 0201-001 (20440) HUMAN ASSESSMENT
HESC 0201 HUMAN ASSESSMENT (3)
This course is the second course of the Health Sciences program.� The focus of this course will be fostering the understanding and application of the many facets of professional healthcare communication, evaluation and documentation.� Student understanding of relevant communication forms and skills will be demonstrated and evaluated.� During this course students will engage in active observations with healthcare practitioners and maneuver the electronic medical record.
STAFF TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM
Hybrid
BATES 117 3.0
HESC 0250-001 (20580) MEDICAL ETHICS
HESC 0250 MEDICAL ETHICS (3)
This course will introduce the student to a variety of topics involving professional and ethical issues in the practice of medicine.� The legal and institutional perspectives of ethical dilemma will be discussed.� A framework of resolution and decision-making will assure the student can manage contemporary ethical issues adequately.
St. Pierre, B ONLINE 3.0
HESC 0350-001 (20581) RSRCH MTHDS IN EVID BASED PRAC
HESC 0350 RESEARCH METHODS IN EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE (3)
This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of evidence-based practice, epidemiology and biostatistics, including acquiring the skill of critically reading medical literature to apply concepts to patient care.� This course will include, but is not limited to, independent, online and small group learning.
Sladyk, K TR 03:45 PM-05:00 PM
Hybrid
BATES 117 3.0
HESC 0350-002 (21278) RSRCH MTHDS IN EVID BASED PRAC
HESC 0350 RESEARCH METHODS IN EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE (3)
This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of evidence-based practice, epidemiology and biostatistics, including acquiring the skill of critically reading medical literature to apply concepts to patient care.� This course will include, but is not limited to, independent, online and small group learning.
Smith, T TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM
Hybrid
BATES 3.0
HESC 0380-001 (20582) PUBLIC HEALTH INTERVENTIONS
HESC 0380 PUBLIC HEALTH INTERVENTION (3)
This course is the culmination of the Health Science courses that allows the student to utilize new learning and skills in a clinical environment.� The student will gain experience in a clinical environment to provide opportunity for patient interviewing and appropriate medical record reporting.� These clinical experiences will expose the student to public health issues and prevention.
STAFF TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM
Hybrid
BATES 117 3.0
History
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
HIST 0101-002 (20557) WESTERN EXPERIENCE I
HIST 0101 WESTERN EXPERIENCE I (3)
A survey of western civilizations from antiquity to 1500 A.D. Major topics include: early civilizations in Mesopotamia, the classical societies of ancient Greece and Rome, Judeo-Christian heritage, spread of Christianity in Europe, medieval society and culture, and European exploration. Surveys the political, economic, social, cultural, and religious developments in Europe to 1500.
Dempsey, J TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM BATES 123 3.0 SOCU
HIST 0101-003 (20769) WESTERN EXPERIENCE I
HIST 0101 WESTERN EXPERIENCE I (3)
A survey of western civilizations from antiquity to 1500 A.D. Major topics include: early civilizations in Mesopotamia, the classical societies of ancient Greece and Rome, Judeo-Christian heritage, spread of Christianity in Europe, medieval society and culture, and European exploration. Surveys the political, economic, social, cultural, and religious developments in Europe to 1500.
Dempsey, J ONLINE 3.0 SOCU
HIST 0102-001 (20456) WESTERN EXPERIENCE II
HIST 0102 WESTERN EXPERIENCE II (3)
A multi-disciplinary survey of�the political, economic, social, cultural, religious and intellectual developments in Europe from the 16th to 21st centuries. Topics include: European exploration, colonialism, and imperialism; rise of nation states; Scientific Revolution; French� AND Russian Revolutions; World War I and II; fascism; rise and fall of the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe; creation of the modern European Union.
Abate, M TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM BATES 223 3.0 SOCU
HIST 0102-002 (20455) WESTERN EXPERIENCE II
HIST 0102 WESTERN EXPERIENCE II (3)
A multi-disciplinary survey of�the political, economic, social, cultural, religious and intellectual developments in Europe from the 16th to 21st centuries. Topics include: European exploration, colonialism, and imperialism; rise of nation states; Scientific Revolution; French� AND Russian Revolutions; World War I and II; fascism; rise and fall of the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe; creation of the modern European Union.
Abate, M TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM BATES 223 3.0 SOCU
HIST 0113-001 (20770) WORLD HISTORY TO 16TH CENTURY
HIST 0113 WORLD HISTORY TO 1600 (3)
Survey of the origins and development of civilizations from prehistory to the 16th century with an emphasis on Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and the Americas. Examines the religious, cultural, political, economic and intellectual characteristics of numerous societies and civilizations. Students will gain insight into the historical roots of the world's major cultural and religious traditions and their impact on today's world.
Banwo, A TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM BATES 123 3.0 GDIV
HIST 0113-002 (20320) WORLD HISTORY TO 16TH CENTURY
HIST 0113 WORLD HISTORY TO 1600 (3)
Survey of the origins and development of civilizations from prehistory to the 16th century with an emphasis on Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and the Americas. Examines the religious, cultural, political, economic and intellectual characteristics of numerous societies and civilizations. Students will gain insight into the historical roots of the world's major cultural and religious traditions and their impact on today's world.
Banwo, A ONLINE 3.0 GDIV
HIST 0114-001 (20558) MODERN WORLD HISTORY
HIST 0114 MODERN WORLD HISTORY (3)
Survey of global history from the 16th to 21st centuries with an emphasis on Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and the Americas.�Examines political, cultural, religious, and scientific developments as well as imperialism, colonialism, modern revolutions, world wars, and the ideological, economic, and technological foundations of the modern world. Students will gain insight into the historical roots of many current global conflicts and issues.
Banwo, A TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM BATES 118 3.0
HIST 0121-001 (21013) THE HISTORIAN
HIST 0121 THE HISTORIAN (3)
A writing intensive course that introduces students to reading and writing about history, historiography, as well as the roles that historians have served in the intellectual growth of the liberal arts and the various professional services that they have rendered to society. Students will be introduced to the basic skills and functions of the historian; how historical interpretations are developed, challenged, and modified; and the applicability of the historian's skills to various professions and careers.
Dempsey, J TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM BATES 123 3.0
HIST 0130-001 (21009) U.S. HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT
HIST 0130 UNITED STATES HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT (3)
This is a survey course intended for Education majors that explores the history for the United States from the pre-contact period through the early colonies, development of government in the early Republic, the expansion of the nation, growing sectional conflicts and their consequences in the 19th century, and the Civil Rights Movement of the mid-20th century. Emphasis is placed on the struggle for civil rights for all. Not for history majors.
Aieta, N MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM BATES 113 3.0 HSGV
HIST 0131-004 (20771) U.S. HISTORY TO 1865
HIST 0131 UNITED STATES HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT TO 1865 (3)
This course traces the history of the United States from the colonial period to the end of the Civil War, surveying the political, economic, social and cultural aspects. Topics include: Native Americans, Colonial Period, American Revolution, United States New Nation, North versus South, American Slavery, Westward Expansion, and the Civil War. The course focuses on major events, presidential administrations, United States Constitution, structure of state and federal government. Not open to students who have taken HIST 0130.
Cleaton-Ruiz, C MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM BATES 118 3.0 HSGV
HIST 0131-005 (20430) U.S. HISTORY TO 1865
HIST 0131 UNITED STATES HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT TO 1865 (3)
This course traces the history of the United States from the colonial period to the end of the Civil War, surveying the political, economic, social and cultural aspects. Topics include: Native Americans, Colonial Period, American Revolution, United States New Nation, North versus South, American Slavery, Westward Expansion, and the Civil War. The course focuses on major events, presidential administrations, United States Constitution, structure of state and federal government. Not open to students who have taken HIST 0130.
Cleaton-Ruiz, C MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM BATES 118 3.0 HSGV
HIST 0131-006 (20772) U.S. HISTORY TO 1865
HIST 0131 UNITED STATES HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT TO 1865 (3)
This course traces the history of the United States from the colonial period to the end of the Civil War, surveying the political, economic, social and cultural aspects. Topics include: Native Americans, Colonial Period, American Revolution, United States New Nation, North versus South, American Slavery, Westward Expansion, and the Civil War. The course focuses on major events, presidential administrations, United States Constitution, structure of state and federal government. Not open to students who have taken HIST 0130.
Orr, B MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM BATES 123 3.0 HSGV
HIST 0131-007 (21116) U.S. HISTORY TO 1865
HIST 0131 UNITED STATES HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT TO 1865 (3)
This course traces the history of the United States from the colonial period to the end of the Civil War, surveying the political, economic, social and cultural aspects. Topics include: Native Americans, Colonial Period, American Revolution, United States New Nation, North versus South, American Slavery, Westward Expansion, and the Civil War. The course focuses on major events, presidential administrations, United States Constitution, structure of state and federal government. Not open to students who have taken HIST 0130.
Cleaton-Ruiz, C ONLINE 3.0 HSGV
HIST 0132-002 (20457) U.S.HISTORY SINCE 1865
HIST 0132 UNITED STATES HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT 1865 � PRESENT (3)
This course traces the history of the United States from the Civil War to the present, surveying the political, economic, social and cultural aspects. Topics include the Civil War, Reconstruction, Industrial Revolution, Progressive Period, 1920�s, Great Depression, World War II, Cold War, Civil Rights, Vietnam War, and domestic and foreign politics to the present. The course focuses on major events, presidential administrations, United States Constitution, structure of state and federal government. Not open to students who have taken HIST 0130.
Dodge, L TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM BATES 221 3.0 HSGV
HIST 0132-003 (21118) U.S.HISTORY SINCE 1865
HIST 0132 UNITED STATES HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT 1865 � PRESENT (3)
This course traces the history of the United States from the Civil War to the present, surveying the political, economic, social and cultural aspects. Topics include the Civil War, Reconstruction, Industrial Revolution, Progressive Period, 1920�s, Great Depression, World War II, Cold War, Civil Rights, Vietnam War, and domestic and foreign politics to the present. The course focuses on major events, presidential administrations, United States Constitution, structure of state and federal government. Not open to students who have taken HIST 0130.
Dodge, L TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM BATES 221 3.0 HSGV
HIST 0132-004 (20345) U.S.HISTORY SINCE 1865
HIST 0132 UNITED STATES HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT 1865 � PRESENT (3)
This course traces the history of the United States from the Civil War to the present, surveying the political, economic, social and cultural aspects. Topics include the Civil War, Reconstruction, Industrial Revolution, Progressive Period, 1920�s, Great Depression, World War II, Cold War, Civil Rights, Vietnam War, and domestic and foreign politics to the present. The course focuses on major events, presidential administrations, United States Constitution, structure of state and federal government. Not open to students who have taken HIST 0130.
Kelliher, E TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM BATES 118 3.0 HSGV
HIST 0132-005 (20944) U.S.HISTORY SINCE 1865
HIST 0132 UNITED STATES HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT 1865 � PRESENT (3)
This course traces the history of the United States from the Civil War to the present, surveying the political, economic, social and cultural aspects. Topics include the Civil War, Reconstruction, Industrial Revolution, Progressive Period, 1920�s, Great Depression, World War II, Cold War, Civil Rights, Vietnam War, and domestic and foreign politics to the present. The course focuses on major events, presidential administrations, United States Constitution, structure of state and federal government. Not open to students who have taken HIST 0130.
Kelliher, E MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM BATES 111 3.0 HSGV
HIST 0202-001 (20343) INTRO HIST RESEARCH/ANALYSIS
HIST 0202 INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS (3)
This course teaches students the essential skills of historical research, writing, and analysis. Students will learn how to: locate and critically analyze different types of primary and secondary sources; identify an author's thesis; evaluate historical arguments and construct their own; use traditional and electronic research tools;�and recognize the roles of subjectivity, perspective, and historical context in shaping historians' interpretations of the past. Students will build on historiographical debates introduced in HIST 0121�and exemplary case studies; learn proper citation methods; and engage in the process of writing, editing, and revision.�The final project will be the production of a substantive�research paper, historiographical analysis, or creative project that demonstrates understanding and application of these skills.
PR Kelliher, E TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM BATES 218 3.0
HIST 0216-001 (21119) FRENCH REVOLUTION
HIST 0216 THE FRENCH REVOLUTION (3)
This course will deal with the upheaval that effectively destroyed the age-old European hierarchical society and laid the foundation for modern political systems. The problem of the impact of ideas, the role of economic dislocation and political dysfunction as portents of revolution will be considered. Use will be made of the newer research into demography and crowd psychology as well as of the traditional literary and historical sources.
Dempsey, J W 04:15 PM-06:15 PM BATES 125 3.0
HIST 0263-001 (20565) U.S. WOMAN'S HISTORY
HIST 0263 U.S. WOMEN�S HISTORY (3)
This course explores United States women�s history from the 1700s to the present. We will focus on the diversity of women�s experiences, including but not limited to European, African-American, Native American, Asian-American, Latina, Jewish, and lesbian. Topics include changing ideas about women�s roles in society; movements for social , legal, economic, and civil rights; sexuality, family and reproduction; women and work.
Dodge, L ONLINE 3.0 UDIV
HIST 0276-001 (21117) LATIN AMERICA TO 1800
HIST 0276 LATIN AMERICA TO 1800 (3)
This course offers a broad survey of Latin American history. Topics include: native cultures and civilizations; impact of Spanish and European colonialism; the role of the Catholic Church; slavery and race relations; political , economic, and social patters of development: and cultural achievements.
Cleaton-Ruiz, C MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM BATES 118 3.0 SOCU/GDIV
HIST 0289-001 (21120) ST: THE MODERN MIDDLE EAST
HIST 0289 TOPICS IN MIDDLE EASTERN HISTORY (3)
Topics relate to the history of a specific Middle Eastern country, empire, geographical region, time period, or theme. Examples might be: Modern Iran, the Ottoman Empire, 20th Century Middle East. Course may be taken 3 times for major credit.
Abate, M ONLINE 3.0
HIST 0290-001 (20773) ST: HISTORY OF WARFARE
HIST 0290 SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE HISTORY (3)
This course will use case studies to compare and explore a topic or theme from the perspective of differing countries, cultures, civilizations, geographic regions and/or time periods.� Examples might be: Comparative Slavery, 20th Century Revolutions, History of Science.� Course may be taken 3 times for major credit. �
Abate, M ONLINE 3.0
HIST 0293-001 (21533) INTERNSHIP: MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES
HIST 0293 INTERNSHIP: MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES (1-12)
Off-campus internships are available in a wide variety of areas, including: museums, archives, libraries, historic sites, and historical societies both in the nearby area and throughout the state.� Summer internships may be available near a student's hometown.� In addition to gaining practical work experience in the historical field, the student will complete a paper relating to their internship.� A maximum of 3 internship credits may be applied to the 18 credit History major electives.
Cleaton-Ruiz, C
HIST 0312-001 (21121) US DISABILITY HISTORY
HIST 0312 U.S. DISABILITY HISTORY:CONSTRUCTING DISABILITY,DIFFERENCE, AND CITIZENSHIP (3)
This course explores the major themes, groups, individuals, and events concerning American disability history, from the pre-colonial period to the present. Students will investigate the lives of persons with disabilities, the ever changing definitions of disability, and public and private institutional responses to disability. Students will consider how perceptions of 'disability' and 'normalcy' have been socially-culturally constructed and reformulated throughout U.S. history from colonial times to the present.
Orr, B MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM BATES 125 3.0
HIST 0332-001 (20341) HISTORY METH-MIDDLE AND SECONDARY
HIST 0332 METHODS OF TEACHING HISTORY: MIDDLE AND SECONDARY (3)
This course prepares students for a career as a middle and/or secondary school history/social studies teacher.� A variety of topics are introduced and practiced in this course, including, but not limited to, lesson and unit planning, active learning and differentiated instruction, critical thinking, assessment techniques and classroom management that incorporate diverse learning needs and backgrounds, and textbook analysis.� Through lesson design and implementation, students learn techniques of collaboration and reflective practice.� The course requires a 30-hour field experience in an approved middle or high school setting.� This field experience must include active teaching of lessons in addition to observing professional teachers.
PR Aieta, N TR 08:15 AM-09:30 AM BATES 113 3.0
Management and Marketing
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
MGMT 0101-001 (20781) INTRO TO BUSINESS
MGMT 0101 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS (3)
An introduction to the field of Business Management. The course covers types of businesses, their organization, and the general functions of financial management, production management and marketing management. (For non-business majors or students considering enrollment in the major.)
STAFF MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM WILSN 402 3.0
MGMT 0107-001 (20354) SOFTWARE APP IN MGMT
MGMT 0107 SOFTWARE APPLICATIONS IN MANAGEMENT (3)
Examines software designed for management including spreadsheets, data-base packages, and mainframe communications. Provides practical experience and systems theory necessary for managerial decision-making. Fundamentals of computer literacy and logical thinking, as they relate to management, are emphasized.
STAFF ONLINE 3.0
MGMT 0107-002 (20397) SOFTWARE APP IN MGMT
MGMT 0107 SOFTWARE APPLICATIONS IN MANAGEMENT (3)
Examines software designed for management including spreadsheets, data-base packages, and mainframe communications. Provides practical experience and systems theory necessary for managerial decision-making. Fundamentals of computer literacy and logical thinking, as they relate to management, are emphasized.
STAFF TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM BATES 03 3.0
MGMT 0107-003 (20406) SOFTWARE APP IN MGMT
MGMT 0107 SOFTWARE APPLICATIONS IN MANAGEMENT (3)
Examines software designed for management including spreadsheets, data-base packages, and mainframe communications. Provides practical experience and systems theory necessary for managerial decision-making. Fundamentals of computer literacy and logical thinking, as they relate to management, are emphasized.
STAFF TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM BATES 03 3.0
MGMT 0107-004 (20415) SOFTWARE APP IN MGMT
MGMT 0107 SOFTWARE APPLICATIONS IN MANAGEMENT (3)
Examines software designed for management including spreadsheets, data-base packages, and mainframe communications. Provides practical experience and systems theory necessary for managerial decision-making. Fundamentals of computer literacy and logical thinking, as they relate to management, are emphasized.
STAFF MW 09:20 AM-10:10 AM WILSN 101 3.0
MGMT 0107-006 (20496) SOFTWARE APP IN MGMT
MGMT 0107 SOFTWARE APPLICATIONS IN MANAGEMENT (3)
Examines software designed for management including spreadsheets, data-base packages, and mainframe communications. Provides practical experience and systems theory necessary for managerial decision-making. Fundamentals of computer literacy and logical thinking, as they relate to management, are emphasized.
STAFF MW 10:25 AM-11:15 AM WILSN 101 3.0
MGMT 0107-007 (20497) SOFTWARE APP IN MGMT
MGMT 0107 SOFTWARE APPLICATIONS IN MANAGEMENT (3)
Examines software designed for management including spreadsheets, data-base packages, and mainframe communications. Provides practical experience and systems theory necessary for managerial decision-making. Fundamentals of computer literacy and logical thinking, as they relate to management, are emphasized.
STAFF ONLINE 3.0
MGMT 0220-001 (20392) PROD-OPERATIONS MGMT
MGMT 0220 PRODUCTION/OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3)
A state of the art strategic systems approach to the operations functions of manufacturing and service organizations. The course covers designing, acquiring, operating, and maintaining facilities and processes; managing the supply chain; controlling and maintaining inventories; and staffing and scheduling human resources needed to provide goods and services.
PR Bakuli, D ONLINE 3.0
MGMT 0220-002 (20499) PROD-OPERATIONS MGMT
MGMT 0220 PRODUCTION/OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3)
A state of the art strategic systems approach to the operations functions of manufacturing and service organizations. The course covers designing, acquiring, operating, and maintaining facilities and processes; managing the supply chain; controlling and maintaining inventories; and staffing and scheduling human resources needed to provide goods and services.
PR STAFF TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 116A 3.0
MGMT 0220-004 (20498) PROD-OPERATIONS MGMT
MGMT 0220 PRODUCTION/OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3)
A state of the art strategic systems approach to the operations functions of manufacturing and service organizations. The course covers designing, acquiring, operating, and maintaining facilities and processes; managing the supply chain; controlling and maintaining inventories; and staffing and scheduling human resources needed to provide goods and services.
PR STAFF MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM WILSN 404 3.0
MGMT 0221-001 (20394) BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
MGMT 0221 BUSINESS MANAGEMENT: A SURVEY OF ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES (3)
Provides a general probe into the role of management in business, exploring concepts of management used in business, various issues of Business Management structures and the organization of management. Topics to be studied include: an examination of a systems approach to management, human behavior, personality conflict in organizations and techniques of creative management. The course shall touch upon several leadership development strategies, models of executive action in business policy or control, and provide a broad comprehensive overview of current issues concerning women, minorities and social responsibility in the field of Business Management.
PR STAFF ONLINE 3.0
MGMT 0221-002 (20416) BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
MGMT 0221 BUSINESS MANAGEMENT: A SURVEY OF ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES (3)
Provides a general probe into the role of management in business, exploring concepts of management used in business, various issues of Business Management structures and the organization of management. Topics to be studied include: an examination of a systems approach to management, human behavior, personality conflict in organizations and techniques of creative management. The course shall touch upon several leadership development strategies, models of executive action in business policy or control, and provide a broad comprehensive overview of current issues concerning women, minorities and social responsibility in the field of Business Management.
PR STAFF TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM WILSN 316 3.0
MGMT 0221-003 (20418) BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
MGMT 0221 BUSINESS MANAGEMENT: A SURVEY OF ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES (3)
Provides a general probe into the role of management in business, exploring concepts of management used in business, various issues of Business Management structures and the organization of management. Topics to be studied include: an examination of a systems approach to management, human behavior, personality conflict in organizations and techniques of creative management. The course shall touch upon several leadership development strategies, models of executive action in business policy or control, and provide a broad comprehensive overview of current issues concerning women, minorities and social responsibility in the field of Business Management.
PR STAFF TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM WILSN 400 3.0
MGMT 0241-001 (20500) BUSINESS LAW
MGMT 0241 BUSINESS LAW I (3)
Develops an understanding of the philosophical and logical development of the law and its relationship to business through the use of text and case analysis. Explores, in-depth, substantive contract law, which forms the basis for business transactions, commencing with the initial negotiation and offer through performance of legally binding obligations and the remedies available if obligations are not performed.
STAFF ONLINE 3.0
MGMT 0241-002 (20501) BUSINESS LAW
MGMT 0241 BUSINESS LAW I (3)
Develops an understanding of the philosophical and logical development of the law and its relationship to business through the use of text and case analysis. Explores, in-depth, substantive contract law, which forms the basis for business transactions, commencing with the initial negotiation and offer through performance of legally binding obligations and the remedies available if obligations are not performed.
STAFF MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM WILSN 401 3.0
MGMT 0241-003 (20502) BUSINESS LAW
MGMT 0241 BUSINESS LAW I (3)
Develops an understanding of the philosophical and logical development of the law and its relationship to business through the use of text and case analysis. Explores, in-depth, substantive contract law, which forms the basis for business transactions, commencing with the initial negotiation and offer through performance of legally binding obligations and the remedies available if obligations are not performed.
STAFF MW 03:10 PM-04:05 PM
Hybrid
WILSN 420 3.0
MGMT 0241-004 (20503) BUSINESS LAW
MGMT 0241 BUSINESS LAW I (3)
Develops an understanding of the philosophical and logical development of the law and its relationship to business through the use of text and case analysis. Explores, in-depth, substantive contract law, which forms the basis for business transactions, commencing with the initial negotiation and offer through performance of legally binding obligations and the remedies available if obligations are not performed.
STAFF TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM ELY 346 3.0
MGMT 0250-001 (20504) QUANT APPROACH TO BUS DEC
MGMT 0250 QUANTITATIVE APPROACHES TO BUSINESS DECISIONS (3)
Covers the application of quantitative techniques to business problem-solving and decision making. Subjects include linear programming, probabilities, simulations, PERT, queuing, and game theory. The application of these analytical tools to business decision problems such as: distribution, inventory control, product mix, scheduling, competitive strategy, and forecasting is covered through case analysis. Approximately 1/3 of the course is devoted to case work.
PR STAFF ONLINE 3.0
MGMT 0250-002 (20505) QUANT APPROACH TO BUS DEC
MGMT 0250 QUANTITATIVE APPROACHES TO BUSINESS DECISIONS (3)
Covers the application of quantitative techniques to business problem-solving and decision making. Subjects include linear programming, probabilities, simulations, PERT, queuing, and game theory. The application of these analytical tools to business decision problems such as: distribution, inventory control, product mix, scheduling, competitive strategy, and forecasting is covered through case analysis. Approximately 1/3 of the course is devoted to case work.
PR STAFF ONLINE 3.0
MGMT 0250-003 (20506) QUANT APPROACH TO BUS DEC
MGMT 0250 QUANTITATIVE APPROACHES TO BUSINESS DECISIONS (3)
Covers the application of quantitative techniques to business problem-solving and decision making. Subjects include linear programming, probabilities, simulations, PERT, queuing, and game theory. The application of these analytical tools to business decision problems such as: distribution, inventory control, product mix, scheduling, competitive strategy, and forecasting is covered through case analysis. Approximately 1/3 of the course is devoted to case work.
PR STAFF MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM WILSN 317 3.0
MGMT 0301-001 (20507) LABOR RELATIONS
MGMT 0301 LABOR RELATIONS (3)
Examines the legal relationship between employer and employee. Uses text reading and case analysis to cover labor legislation, union organizations and practices, unfair labor practices, employment discrimination, and affirmative action programs.
PR STAFF ONLINE 3.0
MGMT 0302-001 (21202) SMALL BUSINESS MGMT
MGMT 0302 SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (3)
A detailed study of the knowledge required and the factors involved in starting and operating a small business. Cost and money management are emphasized. Other areas covered include: product selection, location and timing, pricing and other marketing techniques, purchasing and inventory control, and the personal factors contributing to success.
PR STAFF ONLINE 3.0
MGMT 0308-001 (20355) ORG DEV AND BEHAVIOR
MGMT 0308 ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND BEHAVIOR (3)
Examines the foundations for understanding individual and group behavior and relates these points to the problems faced by managers in organizations. Emphasis is on topics of study relevant to developing managerial effectiveness in interrelationships with other organizational members. Course attempts to develop an understanding of the relationship between individual and organization and to identify management skills that can contribute to effective performance.
PR STAFF ONLINE 3.0
MGMT 0308-002 (20508) ORG DEV AND BEHAVIOR
MGMT 0308 ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND BEHAVIOR (3)
Examines the foundations for understanding individual and group behavior and relates these points to the problems faced by managers in organizations. Emphasis is on topics of study relevant to developing managerial effectiveness in interrelationships with other organizational members. Course attempts to develop an understanding of the relationship between individual and organization and to identify management skills that can contribute to effective performance.
PR Sherman, K TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM WILSN 420 3.0
MGMT 0314-001 (20393) HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
MGMT 0314 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3)
Covers the process of manpower planning and utilization in organizations. Personnel forecasting, employment, training and development, placement, motivation, wage and salary administration, employee benefits, and performance evaluation are covered. Special emphasis is given to problems arising between manager and subordinates, the professional in human services, minority groups, the hard-to-employ worker, and the impact of public policy.
PR STAFF ONLINE 3.0
MGMT 0321-001 (20495) MANAGEMENT INFO SYSTEMS
MGMT 0321 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)
A broad introduction to the use of computer-based information systems in all functional areas of a business. Students learn how information systems may be developed, used, and managed to support the strategic, tactical, and operational decision-making processes in an organization.
PR STAFF ONLINE 3.0
MGMT 0321-003 (20510) MANAGEMENT INFO SYSTEMS
MGMT 0321 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)
A broad introduction to the use of computer-based information systems in all functional areas of a business. Students learn how information systems may be developed, used, and managed to support the strategic, tactical, and operational decision-making processes in an organization.
PR STAFF TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM WILSN 400 3.0
MGMT 0325-001 (20395) BUS STRATEGY AND POLICY
MGMT 0325 BUSINESS POLICY AND STRATEGY (3)
Emphasizes management planning and control techniques in solving business problems and in determining strategy for sales and profit growth. An integrated case study approach will be used. The course will illustrate the many factors that influence complex business decisions. FOR SENIORS ONLY.
PR STAFF ONLINE 3.0
MGMT 0325-003 (20407) BUS STRATEGY AND POLICY
MGMT 0325 BUSINESS POLICY AND STRATEGY (3)
Emphasizes management planning and control techniques in solving business problems and in determining strategy for sales and profit growth. An integrated case study approach will be used. The course will illustrate the many factors that influence complex business decisions. FOR SENIORS ONLY.
PR STAFF TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 401 3.0
MGMT 0325-004 (20931) BUS STRATEGY AND POLICY
MGMT 0325 BUSINESS POLICY AND STRATEGY (3)
Emphasizes management planning and control techniques in solving business problems and in determining strategy for sales and profit growth. An integrated case study approach will be used. The course will illustrate the many factors that influence complex business decisions. FOR SENIORS ONLY.
PR STAFF ONLINE 3.0
MGMT 0338-003 (20420) INTRNATL BUSINESS
MGMT 0338 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (3)
Provides an opportunity to bring the tools and information gained in previous courses to the task of solving managerial problems in international and foreign environments. Focuses on an analysis of market opportunities, methods of entry in foreign business areas, and related business problems.
PR STAFF TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM WILSN 402 3.0 GDIV
MGMT 0338-004 (20483) INTRNATL BUSINESS
MGMT 0338 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (3)
Provides an opportunity to bring the tools and information gained in previous courses to the task of solving managerial problems in international and foreign environments. Focuses on an analysis of market opportunities, methods of entry in foreign business areas, and related business problems.
PR STAFF ONLINE 3.0 GDIV
MGMT 0338-005 (20932) INTRNATL BUSINESS
MGMT 0338 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (3)
Provides an opportunity to bring the tools and information gained in previous courses to the task of solving managerial problems in international and foreign environments. Focuses on an analysis of market opportunities, methods of entry in foreign business areas, and related business problems.
PR STAFF ONLINE 3.0 GDIV
MGMT 0342-002 (20447) ENTREPRENEURSHIP
MGMT 0342 ENTREPRENEURSHIP (3)
Students gain valuable experience in innovating and creating new business or not-for-profit opportunities. They will learn to find and develop new projects, to design new products and services, and to translate their ideas into comprehensive, workable business plans.
PR STAFF ONLINE 3.0
MGMT 0344-001 (21203) PROJECT MANAGEMENT
MGMT 0344 PROJECT MANAGEMENT (3)
Provides students with an understanding of the concepts, processes, and tools for managing projects on time, on budget, within scope, and with high-quality results. These skills may be applied to all types of projects, including new product development, information systems integration, mergers and acquisitions, and construction development. Covers project management techniques such as PERT, CPM, GANTT, WBS and project management software tools.
PR Bakuli, D ONLINE 3.0
MGMT 0345-001 (21516) SPORTS MANAGEMENT INDUSTRY
MGMT 0345 SPORTS MANAGEMENT INDUSTRY (3)
This course provides an overview of the business aspects of the sports management industry. Topics to be covered include the industry structure, governance, stakeholders, and industry dynamics. Basic principles of management, marketing, law, finance, and ethics in sports will be addressed. Students will be challenged to apply knowledge of sports management to solve basic problems faced by sports managers. The course will also explore career opportunities in the field of sports management.
STAFF ONLINE 3.0
MGMT 0346-001 (20511) LEADERSHIP
MGMT 0346 LEADERSHIP (3)
Comprehensively examines evolving leadership theory and practice, from trait theory to modern theories of the leadership process, power, leadership styles, situational leadership, contingency theory, and team leadership. Further topics include diversity, ethics, globalization, popular approaches to leadership, and women and men as leaders. The primary course objective is to prepare students for leadership roles in organizations. Students will lean through experiential exercises, lectures, readings, focused videos, and team projects.
PR Sherman, K TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 403 3.0
MGMT 0398-001 (20570) BUSINESS INTERNSHIP
MGMT 0398 BUSINESS INTERNSHIP (3-15)
Full time business student/must be a second semester junior or senior and have permission of department.
STAFF ONLINE
MRKT 0231-001 (20352) MARKETING MANAGEMENT
MRKT 0231 MARKETING MANAGEMENT (3)
A developmental survey into the field of marketing in business, which will study the roles of marketers in business and society as a whole. Concentration shall be placed on defining marketing, the role of a marketing executive, the various systems of marketing, and the economic factors that affect marketing. In order to probe these questions, the course shall examine consumer behavior, purchase decision making, product pricing, policy and planning, channels of distribution in business, and marketing institutions and organizations. Further dimensions of advertising, marketing research, analysis, forecasting, and marketing information flows, controls, and performance shall be explored.
Furnelli, A ONLINE 3.0
MRKT 0231-002 (20402) MARKETING MANAGEMENT
MRKT 0231 MARKETING MANAGEMENT (3)
A developmental survey into the field of marketing in business, which will study the roles of marketers in business and society as a whole. Concentration shall be placed on defining marketing, the role of a marketing executive, the various systems of marketing, and the economic factors that affect marketing. In order to probe these questions, the course shall examine consumer behavior, purchase decision making, product pricing, policy and planning, channels of distribution in business, and marketing institutions and organizations. Further dimensions of advertising, marketing research, analysis, forecasting, and marketing information flows, controls, and performance shall be explored.
Furnelli, A MW 12:35 PM-01:25 PM
Hybrid
WILSN 404 3.0
MRKT 0231-003 (20512) MARKETING MANAGEMENT
MRKT 0231 MARKETING MANAGEMENT (3)
A developmental survey into the field of marketing in business, which will study the roles of marketers in business and society as a whole. Concentration shall be placed on defining marketing, the role of a marketing executive, the various systems of marketing, and the economic factors that affect marketing. In order to probe these questions, the course shall examine consumer behavior, purchase decision making, product pricing, policy and planning, channels of distribution in business, and marketing institutions and organizations. Further dimensions of advertising, marketing research, analysis, forecasting, and marketing information flows, controls, and performance shall be explored.
Furnelli, A MW 10:25 AM-11:15 AM
Hybrid
WILSN 402 3.0
MRKT 0306-001 (20571) LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT
MRKT 0306 LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT (3)
The process of planning, implementing, and controlling the efficient flow and storage of raw materials, in-process inventory, finished goods, and related information from point of origin to point of consumption for the purpose of conforming to customer requirements. Logistics is a systems approach to business problems and company objectives that can be realized by recognizing the mutual interdependence of the functional areas of the firm.
PR STAFF ONLINE 3.0
MRKT 0307-001 (20413) MARKETING RESEARCH TECHNIQUES
MRKT 0307 MARKETING RESEARCH TECHNIQUES (3)
Reviews the specialized techniques for conducting marketing research and how they contribute to marketing strategy. Material covered includes quantitative and qualitative research, simulation, forecasting, survey preparation, and secondary source analysis.
PR Hart, P ONLINE 3.0
MRKT 0309-001 (20572) SALES AND SALES MANAGEMENT
MRKT 0309 SALES AND SALES MANAGEMENT (3)
A course in effective salesmanship and how to set up and control a field sales organization. Course emphasizes the role of personal selling in the marketing mix and covers all basic sales management issues.
PR Furnelli, A MW 11:30 AM-12:20 PM
Hybrid
WILSN 403 3.0
MRKT 0328-002 (20408) PRIN OF ADVERTISING
MRKT 0328 PRINCIPLES OF ADVERTISING (3)
Vital to the world of modern business is an understanding of the role of advertising. This course provides a study of the techniques and practices of advertising today. Strategies and procedures for campaign design and execution will be examined. Students will take an advertising idea through the various stages of planning, visualizing and writing advertising copy.
PR Hart, P T 09:45 AM-11:00 AM
Hybrid
WILSN 403 3.0
MRKT 0337-001 (20353) CONSUMER BEHAVIOR
MRKT 0337 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR (3)
By gaining a better understanding of the factors that affect consumer behavior, marketers are in a better position to predict how consumers will respond to their marketing strategies. Consumer Behavior draws on the Social Sciences in addition to the quantitative characteristics of the market such as: population patterns, income distribution, living standards, and occupational changes.
Hart, P T 11:15 AM-12:30 PM
Hybrid
WILSN 400 3.0
MRKT 0350-001 (20760) ST: SPORTS MANAGMENT INDUSTRY
MRKT 0350 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MARKETING (3)
Examines and analyzes contemporary topics in marketing, advertising, consumer behavior and related areas. Course content will vary according to the area of specialization of the instructor and the interests of the students. May be repeated if course content differs.
STAFF ONLINE 3.0
MRKT 0350-002 (21510) ST: WINE APPRECIATION
MRKT 0350 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MARKETING (3)
Examines and analyzes contemporary topics in marketing, advertising, consumer behavior and related areas. Course content will vary according to the area of specialization of the instructor and the interests of the students. May be repeated if course content differs.
Connor, W T 04:00 PM-05:30 PM
Hybrid
3.0
MRKT 0350-003 (21511) ST: WINE APPRECIATION
MRKT 0350 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MARKETING (3)
Examines and analyzes contemporary topics in marketing, advertising, consumer behavior and related areas. Course content will vary according to the area of specialization of the instructor and the interests of the students. May be repeated if course content differs.
Connor, W R 04:00 PM-05:30 PM
Hybrid
3.0
Mathematics
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
MATH 0104-002 (20450) PRECALCULUS
MATH 0104 PRE-CALCULUS (3)
This course is appropriate only for students intending to go on to calculus.� Other students should choose a different core course appropriate for their major.� Topics covered include an in-depth investigation of functions; graphing; exponential and logarithmic functions; and trigonometry.
STAFF TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM SCI 304 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0104-003 (20560) PRECALCULUS
MATH 0104 PRE-CALCULUS (3)
This course is appropriate only for students intending to go on to calculus.� Other students should choose a different core course appropriate for their major.� Topics covered include an in-depth investigation of functions; graphing; exponential and logarithmic functions; and trigonometry.
Rokicki, A MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM WILSN 319 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0105-001 (20379) CALCULUS I
MATH 0105 CALCULUS I (4)
A standard first semester course in calculus. Topics include limits and continuity, the derivative and its properties, applications of differentiation, introduction to anti-differentiation, the definite integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.
PR Rokicki, A TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM
W 12:35 PM-01:25 PM
WILSN 416
WILSN 416
4.0 TMTH
MATH 0105-002 (20383) CALCULUS I
MATH 0105 CALCULUS I (4)
A standard first semester course in calculus. Topics include limits and continuity, the derivative and its properties, applications of differentiation, introduction to anti-differentiation, the definite integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.
PR Hotchkiss, P F 09:20 AM-10:10 AM
MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM
WILSN 418
WILSN 418
4.0 TMTH
MATH 0106-001 (20386) CALCULUS II
MATH 0106 CALCULUS II (4)
A continuation of Calculus I. Topics include techniques of integration, applications of the integral, series and sequences, L�H�pital�s Rule, approximation of functions.
PR Von Renesse, C M 12:35 PM-01:25 PM
TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM
WILSN 416
WILSN 418
4.0 TMTH
MATH 0108-001 (20514) ELEMENTARY STATISTICS
MATH 0108 ELEMENTARY STATISTICS (3)
An introduction to basic concepts and techniques of statistics for students needing skills for research techniques in education, business, and the physical, life, and social sciences, or simply to understand the mass of statistical information in modern life. Topics include: graphical techniques such as histograms or box plots; measures of location and spread; scatter plots and correlation; sampling and sampling distributions; estimation and statistical inference (confidence intervals and/or hypothesis testing).
Yang, M MWF 12:35 PM-01:25 PM WILSN 319 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0108-002 (20366) ELEMENTARY STATISTICS
MATH 0108 ELEMENTARY STATISTICS (3)
An introduction to basic concepts and techniques of statistics for students needing skills for research techniques in education, business, and the physical, life, and social sciences, or simply to understand the mass of statistical information in modern life. Topics include: graphical techniques such as histograms or box plots; measures of location and spread; scatter plots and correlation; sampling and sampling distributions; estimation and statistical inference (confidence intervals and/or hypothesis testing).
STAFF MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM WILSN 405 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0108-003 (20369) ELEMENTARY STATISTICS
MATH 0108 ELEMENTARY STATISTICS (3)
An introduction to basic concepts and techniques of statistics for students needing skills for research techniques in education, business, and the physical, life, and social sciences, or simply to understand the mass of statistical information in modern life. Topics include: graphical techniques such as histograms or box plots; measures of location and spread; scatter plots and correlation; sampling and sampling distributions; estimation and statistical inference (confidence intervals and/or hypothesis testing).
STAFF MW 03:10 PM-04:25 PM WILSN 405 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0108-005 (20377) ELEMENTARY STATISTICS
MATH 0108 ELEMENTARY STATISTICS (3)
An introduction to basic concepts and techniques of statistics for students needing skills for research techniques in education, business, and the physical, life, and social sciences, or simply to understand the mass of statistical information in modern life. Topics include: graphical techniques such as histograms or box plots; measures of location and spread; scatter plots and correlation; sampling and sampling distributions; estimation and statistical inference (confidence intervals and/or hypothesis testing).
STAFF ONLINE 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0108-006 (20360) ELEMENTARY STATISTICS
MATH 0108 ELEMENTARY STATISTICS (3)
An introduction to basic concepts and techniques of statistics for students needing skills for research techniques in education, business, and the physical, life, and social sciences, or simply to understand the mass of statistical information in modern life. Topics include: graphical techniques such as histograms or box plots; measures of location and spread; scatter plots and correlation; sampling and sampling distributions; estimation and statistical inference (confidence intervals and/or hypothesis testing).
STAFF ONLINE 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0108-007 (20361) ELEMENTARY STATISTICS
MATH 0108 ELEMENTARY STATISTICS (3)
An introduction to basic concepts and techniques of statistics for students needing skills for research techniques in education, business, and the physical, life, and social sciences, or simply to understand the mass of statistical information in modern life. Topics include: graphical techniques such as histograms or box plots; measures of location and spread; scatter plots and correlation; sampling and sampling distributions; estimation and statistical inference (confidence intervals and/or hypothesis testing).
STAFF ONLINE 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0108-008 (20363) ELEMENTARY STATISTICS
MATH 0108 ELEMENTARY STATISTICS (3)
An introduction to basic concepts and techniques of statistics for students needing skills for research techniques in education, business, and the physical, life, and social sciences, or simply to understand the mass of statistical information in modern life. Topics include: graphical techniques such as histograms or box plots; measures of location and spread; scatter plots and correlation; sampling and sampling distributions; estimation and statistical inference (confidence intervals and/or hypothesis testing).
STAFF ONLINE 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0108-009 (20448) ELEMENTARY STATISTICS
MATH 0108 ELEMENTARY STATISTICS (3)
An introduction to basic concepts and techniques of statistics for students needing skills for research techniques in education, business, and the physical, life, and social sciences, or simply to understand the mass of statistical information in modern life. Topics include: graphical techniques such as histograms or box plots; measures of location and spread; scatter plots and correlation; sampling and sampling distributions; estimation and statistical inference (confidence intervals and/or hypothesis testing).
STAFF MWF 08:15 AM-09:05 AM WILSN 416 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0108-010 (20727) ELEMENTARY STATISTICS
MATH 0108 ELEMENTARY STATISTICS (3)
An introduction to basic concepts and techniques of statistics for students needing skills for research techniques in education, business, and the physical, life, and social sciences, or simply to understand the mass of statistical information in modern life. Topics include: graphical techniques such as histograms or box plots; measures of location and spread; scatter plots and correlation; sampling and sampling distributions; estimation and statistical inference (confidence intervals and/or hypothesis testing).
STAFF MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM WILSN 405 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0108-011 (20374) ELEMENTARY STATISTICS
MATH 0108 ELEMENTARY STATISTICS (3)
An introduction to basic concepts and techniques of statistics for students needing skills for research techniques in education, business, and the physical, life, and social sciences, or simply to understand the mass of statistical information in modern life. Topics include: graphical techniques such as histograms or box plots; measures of location and spread; scatter plots and correlation; sampling and sampling distributions; estimation and statistical inference (confidence intervals and/or hypothesis testing).
STAFF W 04:15 PM-05:30 PM
Hybrid
WILSN 416 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0108-012 (20728) ELEMENTARY STATISTICS
MATH 0108 ELEMENTARY STATISTICS (3)
An introduction to basic concepts and techniques of statistics for students needing skills for research techniques in education, business, and the physical, life, and social sciences, or simply to understand the mass of statistical information in modern life. Topics include: graphical techniques such as histograms or box plots; measures of location and spread; scatter plots and correlation; sampling and sampling distributions; estimation and statistical inference (confidence intervals and/or hypothesis testing).
STAFF TR 08:15 AM-09:30 AM WILSN 405 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0108-013 (20515) ELEMENTARY STATISTICS
MATH 0108 ELEMENTARY STATISTICS (3)
An introduction to basic concepts and techniques of statistics for students needing skills for research techniques in education, business, and the physical, life, and social sciences, or simply to understand the mass of statistical information in modern life. Topics include: graphical techniques such as histograms or box plots; measures of location and spread; scatter plots and correlation; sampling and sampling distributions; estimation and statistical inference (confidence intervals and/or hypothesis testing).
STAFF MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM WILSN 319 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0108-014 (20516) ELEMENTARY STATISTICS
MATH 0108 ELEMENTARY STATISTICS (3)
An introduction to basic concepts and techniques of statistics for students needing skills for research techniques in education, business, and the physical, life, and social sciences, or simply to understand the mass of statistical information in modern life. Topics include: graphical techniques such as histograms or box plots; measures of location and spread; scatter plots and correlation; sampling and sampling distributions; estimation and statistical inference (confidence intervals and/or hypothesis testing).
STAFF TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM WILSN 405 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0108-H01 (20370) HNRS: ELEMENTARY STATISTICS
MATH 0108 ELEMENTARY STATISTICS (3)
An introduction to basic concepts and techniques of statistics for students needing skills for research techniques in education, business, and the physical, life, and social sciences, or simply to understand the mass of statistical information in modern life. Topics include: graphical techniques such as histograms or box plots; measures of location and spread; scatter plots and correlation; sampling and sampling distributions; estimation and statistical inference (confidence intervals and/or hypothesis testing).
Von Renesse, C TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM WILSN 418 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0110-002 (20729) MATH EXPLORATIONS
MATH 0110 MATHEMATICAL EXPLORATIONS (3)
An introductory course designed to provide the liberal arts major with an opportunity to develop a broader appreciation of mathematics by exploring ways in which the artistic, aesthetic, intellectual, and humanistic aspects of mathematics are as important as its utility. Topics may include: mathematical reasoning, the infinite, topology, chaos and fractals, symmetry, elementary number theory, modern geometry, and the history of mathematics.
Hotchkiss, P TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 416 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0110-003 (20730) MATH EXPLORATIONS
MATH 0110 MATHEMATICAL EXPLORATIONS (3)
An introductory course designed to provide the liberal arts major with an opportunity to develop a broader appreciation of mathematics by exploring ways in which the artistic, aesthetic, intellectual, and humanistic aspects of mathematics are as important as its utility. Topics may include: mathematical reasoning, the infinite, topology, chaos and fractals, symmetry, elementary number theory, modern geometry, and the history of mathematics.
STAFF TR 03:45 PM-05:00 PM WILSN 418 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0110-006 (20375) MATH EXPLORATIONS
MATH 0110 MATHEMATICAL EXPLORATIONS (3)
An introductory course designed to provide the liberal arts major with an opportunity to develop a broader appreciation of mathematics by exploring ways in which the artistic, aesthetic, intellectual, and humanistic aspects of mathematics are as important as its utility. Topics may include: mathematical reasoning, the infinite, topology, chaos and fractals, symmetry, elementary number theory, modern geometry, and the history of mathematics.
Hotchkiss, P MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM WILSN 319 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0110-008 (20731) MATH EXPLORATIONS
MATH 0110 MATHEMATICAL EXPLORATIONS (3)
An introductory course designed to provide the liberal arts major with an opportunity to develop a broader appreciation of mathematics by exploring ways in which the artistic, aesthetic, intellectual, and humanistic aspects of mathematics are as important as its utility. Topics may include: mathematical reasoning, the infinite, topology, chaos and fractals, symmetry, elementary number theory, modern geometry, and the history of mathematics.
STAFF TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM WILSN 405 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0110-009 (20732) MATH EXPLORATIONS
MATH 0110 MATHEMATICAL EXPLORATIONS (3)
An introductory course designed to provide the liberal arts major with an opportunity to develop a broader appreciation of mathematics by exploring ways in which the artistic, aesthetic, intellectual, and humanistic aspects of mathematics are as important as its utility. Topics may include: mathematical reasoning, the infinite, topology, chaos and fractals, symmetry, elementary number theory, modern geometry, and the history of mathematics.
STAFF TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM WILSN 418 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0111-001 (20380) MATH APPLICATIONS
MATH 0111 MATHEMATICAL APPLICATIONS (3)
An introductory course designed to provide the liberal arts major with opportunities to investigate ways in which mathematics is used to solve real world problems in a variety of disciplines. Applications may include such topics as voting schemes, fair division, networks, scheduling, finance, probability and statistics.
STAFF ONLINE 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0111-002 (20362) MATH APPLICATIONS
MATH 0111 MATHEMATICAL APPLICATIONS (3)
An introductory course designed to provide the liberal arts major with opportunities to investigate ways in which mathematics is used to solve real world problems in a variety of disciplines. Applications may include such topics as voting schemes, fair division, networks, scheduling, finance, probability and statistics.
STAFF ONLINE 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0111-003 (20464) MATH APPLICATIONS
MATH 0111 MATHEMATICAL APPLICATIONS (3)
An introductory course designed to provide the liberal arts major with opportunities to investigate ways in which mathematics is used to solve real world problems in a variety of disciplines. Applications may include such topics as voting schemes, fair division, networks, scheduling, finance, probability and statistics.
STAFF TR 08:15 AM-09:30 AM WILSN 418 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0111-004 (20364) MATH APPLICATIONS
MATH 0111 MATHEMATICAL APPLICATIONS (3)
An introductory course designed to provide the liberal arts major with opportunities to investigate ways in which mathematics is used to solve real world problems in a variety of disciplines. Applications may include such topics as voting schemes, fair division, networks, scheduling, finance, probability and statistics.
STAFF MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM WILSN 416 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0111-005 (20390) MATH APPLICATIONS
MATH 0111 MATHEMATICAL APPLICATIONS (3)
An introductory course designed to provide the liberal arts major with opportunities to investigate ways in which mathematics is used to solve real world problems in a variety of disciplines. Applications may include such topics as voting schemes, fair division, networks, scheduling, finance, probability and statistics.
STAFF MWF 12:35 PM-01:25 PM WILSN 405 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0111-006 (20734) MATH APPLICATIONS
MATH 0111 MATHEMATICAL APPLICATIONS (3)
An introductory course designed to provide the liberal arts major with opportunities to investigate ways in which mathematics is used to solve real world problems in a variety of disciplines. Applications may include such topics as voting schemes, fair division, networks, scheduling, finance, probability and statistics.
STAFF TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 418 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0111-007 (20735) MATH APPLICATIONS
MATH 0111 MATHEMATICAL APPLICATIONS (3)
An introductory course designed to provide the liberal arts major with opportunities to investigate ways in which mathematics is used to solve real world problems in a variety of disciplines. Applications may include such topics as voting schemes, fair division, networks, scheduling, finance, probability and statistics.
STAFF TR 03:45 PM-05:00 PM WILSN 319 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0113-001 (21026) INTRODUCTION TO DATA SCIENCE Yang, M TR 03:45 PM-05:00 PM WILSN 407 3.0
MATH 0115-001 (20367) MATH FOR BUS-SOC SCI
MATH 0115 MATHEMATICS FOR BUSINESS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES (3)
An introduction to algebraic modeling, with an emphasis on applications in business and the social sciences. Topics include: using algebraic models to describe the relationship between variables, using graphs to visualize models, and choosing and interpreting various models. Calculus is introduced and is used as a tool for studying the structure of algebraic models.
Judge, J MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM
Hybrid
WILSN 405 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0115-003 (20378) MATH FOR BUS-SOC SCI
MATH 0115 MATHEMATICS FOR BUSINESS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES (3)
An introduction to algebraic modeling, with an emphasis on applications in business and the social sciences. Topics include: using algebraic models to describe the relationship between variables, using graphs to visualize models, and choosing and interpreting various models. Calculus is introduced and is used as a tool for studying the structure of algebraic models.
Judge, J TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM
Hybrid
WILSN 405 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0123-001 (20391) MATH MTHDS IN NAT. SCIENCE
MATH 0123 MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN THE NATURAL SCIENCES (3)
This course provides students having a strong interest in natural science with specialized and necessary mathematical skills to address problems in their majors.� Topics covered include functions and their behavior, graphs, cure fitting, modeling, descriptive and inferential statistics, data handling, and experimental design.� Hands-on learning techniques are emphasized with an extensive use of technology such as graphing calculators, computers and software for data analysis, and data collection equipment.
Vorwerk, K MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM WILSN 207 3.0 ARSN
MATH 0123-002 (21279) MATH MTHDS IN NAT. SCIENCE
MATH 0123 MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN THE NATURAL SCIENCES (3)
This course provides students having a strong interest in natural science with specialized and necessary mathematical skills to address problems in their majors.� Topics covered include functions and their behavior, graphs, cure fitting, modeling, descriptive and inferential statistics, data handling, and experimental design.� Hands-on learning techniques are emphasized with an extensive use of technology such as graphing calculators, computers and software for data analysis, and data collection equipment.
Vorwerk, M MWF 08:15 AM-09:05 AM WILSN 207 3.0 ARSN
MATH 0153-001 (20384) FOUNDATIONS: NUMBER SYSTEMS
MATH 0153 FOUNDATIONS: NUMBER SYSTEMS (3)
An introductory course on number systems. Topics will include: the development and properties of various number systems (such as integers, rational, real, and complex numbers); and operations and different representations in these number systems (such as those in bases other than 10). Students will develop a conceptual understanding of the course material in a learning environment that models the pedagogical foundations of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Mathematics and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Standards.
Welsh, E MWF 08:15 AM-09:05 AM WILSN 418 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0153-002 (20381) FOUNDATIONS: NUMBER SYSTEMS
MATH 0153 FOUNDATIONS: NUMBER SYSTEMS (3)
An introductory course on number systems. Topics will include: the development and properties of various number systems (such as integers, rational, real, and complex numbers); and operations and different representations in these number systems (such as those in bases other than 10). Students will develop a conceptual understanding of the course material in a learning environment that models the pedagogical foundations of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Mathematics and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Standards.
Rokicki, A TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 319 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0153-003 (20388) FOUNDATIONS: NUMBER SYSTEMS
MATH 0153 FOUNDATIONS: NUMBER SYSTEMS (3)
An introductory course on number systems. Topics will include: the development and properties of various number systems (such as integers, rational, real, and complex numbers); and operations and different representations in these number systems (such as those in bases other than 10). Students will develop a conceptual understanding of the course material in a learning environment that models the pedagogical foundations of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Mathematics and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Standards.
STAFF TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM REMSYC 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0153-004 (20936) FOUNDATIONS: NUMBER SYSTEMS
MATH 0153 FOUNDATIONS: NUMBER SYSTEMS (3)
An introductory course on number systems. Topics will include: the development and properties of various number systems (such as integers, rational, real, and complex numbers); and operations and different representations in these number systems (such as those in bases other than 10). Students will develop a conceptual understanding of the course material in a learning environment that models the pedagogical foundations of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Mathematics and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Standards.
STAFF TR 03:45 PM-05:00 PM REMSYC 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0216-001 (20389) LITERATURE OF MATHEMATICS
MATH 0216 STUDIES IN THE LITERATURE OF MATHEMATICS (3)
A study of mathematical literature devoted to selected topics from fundamental scientific, philosophical, artistic, cultural, and technological questions, debates, and revolutions. Source material will be taken from the widely varied genres of mathematical literature: fiction, drama, essays, memoirs, exposition for lay audiences, history, and philosophy. Regular class discussions, regular writing assignments, poster projects, and research papers actively will involve students in analyzing and/or creating literature, which reflects both their role in and the understanding of the mathematical experience.
PR Hotchkiss, P TR 08:15 AM-09:30 AM WILSN 416 3.0 LPA
MATH 0250-002 (20385) FOUND:PATTERNS,REASON,ALGEBRA
MATH 0250 FOUNDATIONS: PATTERNS, REASONING AND ALGEBRA (3)
An introductory course in the foundations of mathematics. Topics include: finding, analyzing, and describing patterns; sets and classification; functions and relations; inductive and deductive reasoning; problem solving; and logic. Students will develop a conceptual understanding of the course material in a learning environment that models the pedagogical foundations of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Mathematics and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Standards.
PR STAFF TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM REMSYC 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0250-003 (20739) FOUND:PATTERNS,REASON,ALGEBRA
MATH 0250 FOUNDATIONS: PATTERNS, REASONING AND ALGEBRA (3)
An introductory course in the foundations of mathematics. Topics include: finding, analyzing, and describing patterns; sets and classification; functions and relations; inductive and deductive reasoning; problem solving; and logic. Students will develop a conceptual understanding of the course material in a learning environment that models the pedagogical foundations of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Mathematics and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Standards.
PR Ecke, V TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM WILSN 319 3.0 TMTH
MATH 0254-001 (21027) PILOT:DATA ANYSIS AND GEOMTRY
MATH 0254 FOUNDATIONS: DATA ANALYSIS AND GEOMETRY (3)
An introductory course in the foundations of data analysis and geometry for elementary school teacher candidates. The course focuses on the deep mathematical ideas and concepts required to support PreK-6 students in making sense of mathematics. Topics in data analysis will include: understanding, constructing, and computing data graphs and numerical summary measures; probability models; and statistical inference. For geometry students�will make sense of tessellations, area, surface area, volume, dimensions, art and mathematics, and symmetry and angles. Students will develop a conceptual understanding of the course material in a learning environment that models the pedagogical foundations of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Mathematics and the NCTM Standards.
PR Welsh, E MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM WILSN 416 3.0
MATH 0254-002 (21028) PILOT:DATA ANYSIS AND GEOMTRY
MATH 0254 FOUNDATIONS: DATA ANALYSIS AND GEOMETRY (3)
An introductory course in the foundations of data analysis and geometry for elementary school teacher candidates. The course focuses on the deep mathematical ideas and concepts required to support PreK-6 students in making sense of mathematics. Topics in data analysis will include: understanding, constructing, and computing data graphs and numerical summary measures; probability models; and statistical inference. For geometry students�will make sense of tessellations, area, surface area, volume, dimensions, art and mathematics, and symmetry and angles. Students will develop a conceptual understanding of the course material in a learning environment that models the pedagogical foundations of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Mathematics and the NCTM Standards.
PR Welsh, E TR 08:15 AM-09:30 AM WILSN 319 3.0
MATH 0254-003 (21029) PILOT:DATA ANYSIS AND GEOMTRY
MATH 0254 FOUNDATIONS: DATA ANALYSIS AND GEOMETRY (3)
An introductory course in the foundations of data analysis and geometry for elementary school teacher candidates. The course focuses on the deep mathematical ideas and concepts required to support PreK-6 students in making sense of mathematics. Topics in data analysis will include: understanding, constructing, and computing data graphs and numerical summary measures; probability models; and statistical inference. For geometry students�will make sense of tessellations, area, surface area, volume, dimensions, art and mathematics, and symmetry and angles. Students will develop a conceptual understanding of the course material in a learning environment that models the pedagogical foundations of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Mathematics and the NCTM Standards.
PR Welsh, E TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM WILSN 319 3.0
MATH 0254-004 (21030) PILOT:DATA ANYSIS AND GEOMTRY
MATH 0254 FOUNDATIONS: DATA ANALYSIS AND GEOMETRY (3)
An introductory course in the foundations of data analysis and geometry for elementary school teacher candidates. The course focuses on the deep mathematical ideas and concepts required to support PreK-6 students in making sense of mathematics. Topics in data analysis will include: understanding, constructing, and computing data graphs and numerical summary measures; probability models; and statistical inference. For geometry students�will make sense of tessellations, area, surface area, volume, dimensions, art and mathematics, and symmetry and angles. Students will develop a conceptual understanding of the course material in a learning environment that models the pedagogical foundations of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Mathematics and the NCTM Standards.
PR Ecke, V TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM WILSN 319 3.0
MATH 0300-001 (20513) DISCRETE MATHEMATICS W PROOFS
MATH 0300 DISCRETE MATHEMATICS WITH PROOFS (3)
An introduction to advanced mathematical thought with an emphasis on discrete mathematics.�Topics will include logic, set theory, Boolean algebra, relations, recursion, modular arithmetic, and graphs.�Additional topics in discrete and continuous mathematics may include group theory, topology of the real numbers, complex functions, and numerical methods.�Students will develop proof-writing skills by regularly writing, analyzing, and editing mathematical proofs.
Johnson, J MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM WILSN 418 3.0
MATH 0304-001 (21567) SA: DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
MATH 0304 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (3)
Geometric and physical meaning of differential equations. Theory and solution of first, second and higher order linear and non-linear differential equations. Initial and boundary value problems. Finite difference equations.
PR Vorwerk, K 3.0
MATH 0306-001 (21031) MODERN GEOMETRIES 1
MATH 0306 MODERN GEOMETRIES (3)
An integrated course consisting of intuitive, synthetic, and analytic approaches to Euclidean and other geometries. Topics will include axiomatic foundations, finite geometries, non-Euclidean geometries, and synthetic projective geometry.
PR Ecke, V MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM WILSN 418 3.0
MATH 0333-001 (21032) APP STAT AND EXPER DESIGN
MATH 0333 APPLIED STATISTICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN (3)
A study of the application of statistical procedures employed in empirical research and methods used in interpreting numerical results. Topics in statistics include: introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics, hypothesis testing, parametric and non-parametric tests (correlation, regression, the t-test, analysis of variance, and factor analysis). The underlying assumptions of several experimental designs will also be examined. Students will learn appropriate software (R, SPSS, SAS or similar)
PR Vorwerk, K MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM WILSN 416 3.0
MATH 0337-001 (21033) FOUND.SECOND.SCH MATH
MATH 0337 FOUNDATIONS OF SECONDARY AND MIDDLE SCHOOL MATHEMATICS (3)
This course prepares students for teaching the middle and secondary school mathematics curriculum.� Mathematical topics to be considered include: geometry, algebra, basic skills, number theory, probability and statistics and the use of calculators and other forms of technology in the classroom.� There is a focus on development of lesson and unit plans, student assessment, and reflective practice.� Students practice instructional strategies that set high expectations, make knowledge accessible for all students, and create a safe and collaborative learning environment in which student diversity is respected.� A 30-hours field experience is a course requirement and it is recommended that students concurrently take EDUC 0363�.
Von Renesse, C TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM WILSN 416 3.0
MATH 0340-001 (20376) MATHEMATICAL STAT I
MATH 0340 MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS I (3)
A calculus-based introduction to probability and statistics. Topics include graphical techniques for data analysis (histograms, stem AND leaf displays, box plots), set theory, principles of counting, sample spaces, discrete and continuous probability distributions, probability functions, random variables, moment-generating functions, statistical inference (point estimation, decision-making based on confidence intervals/hypothesis testing).
PR Judge, J TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 405 3.0
MATH 0344-001 (21034) PROBABILITY THEORY
MATH 0344 PROBABILITY THEORY (3)
�A course in calculus-based probability. �Topics include basic set operations, counting techniques, independence, probability spaces, discrete and continuous probability distributions (including binomial, geometric, Poisson, hypergeometric, negative binomial, uniform, exponential, gamma, univariate and bivariate normal, and others at instructor's discretion), transformations, expectations, generating functions, marginal and conditional distributions, joint and mixed distributions, law of large numbers, and central limit theorems.
PR Johnson, J MWF 12:35 PM-01:25 PM WILSN 418 3.0
MATH 0390-001 (20387) SENIOR SEM.IN MATHEMATICS
MATH 0390 SENIOR SEMINAR IN MATHEMATICS (3)
A capstone experience for senior mathematics majors which unifies many areas of the undergraduate curriculum and serves as a rite of passage into the community of mathematicians. The curriculum is topical in nature and varies by course offering. Topics studied are of contemporary importance and are considered from their historical genesis through their current role in the ongoing development of the field of mathematics.
PR Vorwerk, K TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM WILSN 416 3.0
Military Science
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
MLSC 0100-001 (20423) ARMY PHYSICAL TRAINING Ortega, A T 06:00 AM-07:00 AM WDWRD 120 1.0
MLSC 0101-001 (20424) FOUNDATIONS OF OFFICERSHP Ortega, A T 08:15 AM-09:05 AM ELY 212 1.0
MLSC 0201-001 (20429) INDIVIDUAL LEADERSHIP STUDIES Ortega, A T 09:20 AM-10:10 AM ELY 212 2.0
Music
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
MUSC 0101-002 (20943) MUSIC APPRECIATION
MUSC 0101 MUSIC APPRECIATION (3)
The study of masterpieces of music from each era, from the Middle Ages through contemporary times. Emphasis is on directed listening and music is analyzed with reference to style characteristics.
Danielsen, K MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM DOWER 244 3.0 AAPP
MUSC 0101-005 (20138) MUSIC APPRECIATION
MUSC 0101 MUSIC APPRECIATION (3)
The study of masterpieces of music from each era, from the Middle Ages through contemporary times. Emphasis is on directed listening and music is analyzed with reference to style characteristics.
Barber, F MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM DOWER 245 3.0 AAPP
MUSC 0101-006 (20479) MUSIC APPRECIATION
MUSC 0101 MUSIC APPRECIATION (3)
The study of masterpieces of music from each era, from the Middle Ages through contemporary times. Emphasis is on directed listening and music is analyzed with reference to style characteristics.
Goldsmith, M ONLINE 3.0 AAPP
MUSC 0101-007 (20153) MUSIC APPRECIATION
MUSC 0101 MUSIC APPRECIATION (3)
The study of masterpieces of music from each era, from the Middle Ages through contemporary times. Emphasis is on directed listening and music is analyzed with reference to style characteristics.
Wade, S TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM DOWER 244 3.0 AAPP
MUSC 0104-001 (20126) WORLD MUSIC
MUSC 0104 WORLD MUSIC (3)
A survey of world music literature focusing on non-Western cultures including: Africa, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Latin and South America; and lesser known music of the Western world including Native American and Canadian peoples.
Gibson, R ONLINE 3.0 GDIV/AAPP
MUSC 0104-002 (21273) WORLD MUSIC
MUSC 0104 WORLD MUSIC (3)
A survey of world music literature focusing on non-Western cultures including: Africa, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Latin and South America; and lesser known music of the Western world including Native American and Canadian peoples.
Gibson, R ONLINE 3.0 GDIV/AAPP
MUSC 0104-003 (20128) WORLD MUSIC
MUSC 0104 WORLD MUSIC (3)
A survey of world music literature focusing on non-Western cultures including: Africa, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Latin and South America; and lesser known music of the Western world including Native American and Canadian peoples.
Saloio, E MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM DOWER 242 3.0 GDIV/AAPP
MUSC 0104-004 (20131) WORLD MUSIC
MUSC 0104 WORLD MUSIC (3)
A survey of world music literature focusing on non-Western cultures including: Africa, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Latin and South America; and lesser known music of the Western world including Native American and Canadian peoples.
Orgill, E TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM DOWER 244 3.0 GDIV/AAPP
MUSC 0107-001 (20577) INTRO TO MUSIC THERAPY Honig, T MW 03:10 PM-04:15 PM DOWER 3.0
MUSC 0110-001 (21163) BASIC MUSIC THEORY
MUSC 0110 BASIC MUSIC THEORY (3)
An introduction to the fundamental aspects of music making including rhythm, notation, scales, intervals, chords, beginning harmony, sight singing, ear training, and keyboard harmony.
Coutsouridis, P MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM DOWER 144 3.0 AAPP
MUSC 0110-002 (20147) BASIC MUSIC THEORY
MUSC 0110 BASIC MUSIC THEORY (3)
An introduction to the fundamental aspects of music making including rhythm, notation, scales, intervals, chords, beginning harmony, sight singing, ear training, and keyboard harmony.
Atherton, K MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM DOWER 144 3.0 AAPP
MUSC 0110-003 (20149) BASIC MUSIC THEORY
MUSC 0110 BASIC MUSIC THEORY (3)
An introduction to the fundamental aspects of music making including rhythm, notation, scales, intervals, chords, beginning harmony, sight singing, ear training, and keyboard harmony.
Blanchard, S MWF 12:35 PM-01:25 PM DOWER 144 3.0 AAPP
MUSC 0111-001 (20809) MUSIC THEORY I
MUSC 0111 MUSIC THEORY I (2)
An introductory music theory course combining the study of notation, scales, intervals, chord construction, rhythm, melody, harmonic progression, voice leading, and keyboard harmony.
Bonacci, A MWF 08:15 AM-09:05 AM DOWER 144 2.0
MUSC 0113-001 (20587) SIGHT SINGING/EAR TRAINING I
MUSC 0113 SIGHT SINGING AND EAR TRAINING I (2)
An introductory course in elementary musicianship skills emphasizing sight singing, ear training and rhythmic reading.
LaVoie, K MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM DOWER 144 2.0
MUSC 0130-001 (21171) LYRIC DICTION I
MUSC 0130 LYRIC DICTION I (1)
An introduction to sung diction in Latin, German and Italian, including the introduction and use of the International Phonetic Alphabet as a basis for continued study of sung language. Singers will prepare and perform literature in all languages studied.
Brown-Bonacci, M TR 02:40 PM-03:30 PM DOWER 144 1.0
MUSC 0141-001 (20158) UNIVERSITY CHORUS
MUSC 0141 UNIVERSITY CHORUS (0.5)
Mixed voices. Performs on and off campus at least twice each semester. Literature covers all periods of music history with emphasis on major works. May be repeated for credit.
Barber, F MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM DOWER 134 .5
MUSC 0143-001 (20132) WIND SYMPHONY
MUSC 0143 WIND SYMPHONY (0.5)
Open to all qualified students through the successful completion of an audition. Dedicated to the finest in wind instrument repertory. Several concerts, both on and off campus each year. May be repeated for credit.
LaVoie, K T 07:00 PM-08:30 PM
MW 01:40 PM-02:30 PM
DOWER 134
DOWER 134
.5
MUSC 0145-001 (20662) JAZZ BIG BAND
MUSC 0145 JAZZ BIG BAND (0.5)
A large jazz ensemble class. Emphasis on section playing skills. Repertoire consists of a broad range of musical styles. Involves concert performances. By audition only. May be repeated for credit.
Atherton, T T 03:45 PM-05:00 PM DOWER 127 .5
MUSC 0152-001 (20658) PIANO CLASS I
MUSC 0152 PIANO CLASS I (FOR MUSIC MAJORS)
(0.5) A keyboard class designed to develop practical playing skills. Begins with emphasis on fundamental piano techniques, moves through emphasis on chording, accompanying, and improvising and sight reading, and concludes with the learning of assigned compositions and the development of transposition skills.
Thomas, A TR 08:30 AM-09:30 AM DOWER 151 .5
MUSC 0154-001 (20656) WOODWIND CLASS: SAXOPHONE
MUSC 0154 WOODWIND CLASS (0.5)
The focus will be on either Flute, Oboe/Bassoon, Clarinet, or Saxophone. Involves classroom study of the particular instrument through practical experience in performance to the extent that the student can demonstrate a knowledge of the basic fundamentals of embouchure, fingerings, breathing and tone production, as they apply to the particular instrument being studied.
Orgill, E F 12:30 PM-01:30 PM DOWER 134 .5
MUSC 0155-001 (21174) BRASS CLASS: HORN
MUSC 0155 BRASS CLASS (0.5)
(Trumpet, Horn, Trombone, or Tuba) Classroom study of the particular instrument through practical experience in performance to the extent that the student can demonstrate a knowledge of the basic fundamentals of embouchure, fingerings, breathing and tone production as they apply to the particular instrument being studied.
Chaloux, A R 05:00 PM-06:00 PM DOWER 134 .5
MUSC 0157-001 (21164) PERCUSSION CLASS
MUSC 0157 PERCUSSION CLASS (0.5)
The study and acquisition of skills applicable to the various instruments of the percussion section.
Coutsouridis, P TR 08:40 AM-09:30 AM DOWER 134 .5
MUSC 0160-002 (20652) HISTORY OF JAZZ
MUSC 0160 HISTORY OF JAZZ (3)
The study of jazz music from the early 1900�s to the present. Emphasis on styles and trends of major jazz performers and ensembles within each period.
Coutsouridis, P TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM DOWER 245 3.0 UDIV/AAPP
MUSC 0160-003 (20157) HISTORY OF JAZZ
MUSC 0160 HISTORY OF JAZZ (3)
The study of jazz music from the early 1900�s to the present. Emphasis on styles and trends of major jazz performers and ensembles within each period.
Coutsouridis, P TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM DOWER 245 3.0 UDIV/AAPP
MUSC 0160-006 (20653) HISTORY OF JAZZ
MUSC 0160 HISTORY OF JAZZ (3)
The study of jazz music from the early 1900�s to the present. Emphasis on styles and trends of major jazz performers and ensembles within each period.
Schwartz, J TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM DOWER 245 3.0 UDIV/AAPP
MUSC 0160-H01 (21248) HNRS: HISTORY OF JAZZ
MUSC 0160 HISTORY OF JAZZ (3)
The study of jazz music from the early 1900�s to the present. Emphasis on styles and trends of major jazz performers and ensembles within each period.
Lawson, S MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM DOWER 242 3.0 UDIV/AAPP
MUSC 0170-067 (20861) APPL INSTR 1: TRUMPET
MUSC 0170 APPLIED MUSIC (MINOR)
I (0.5)
LaVoie, K .5
MUSC 0171-055 (20847) APPL INSTR 2: PIANO
MUSC 0171 APPLIED MUSIC (MINOR)
II (0.5)
Thomas, A .5
MUSC 0173-059 (21569) APPLL INSTR 4: SAXOPHONE
MUSC 0173 APPLIED MUSIC (MINOR)
IV (0.5)
Orgill, E .5
MUSC 0174-019 (20857) APPL INSTR 1: FLUTE
MUSC 0174 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
I (1)
Saloio, E 1.0
MUSC 0174-035 (20844) APPL INSTR 1: GUITAR
MUSC 0174 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
I (1)
Mason, J 1.0
MUSC 0174-053 (20833) APPL INSTR 1: PERCUSSION
MUSC 0174 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
I (1)
Coutsouridis, P 1.0
MUSC 0174-055 (20860) APPL INSTR 1: PIANO
MUSC 0174 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
I (1)
Thomas, A 1.0
MUSC 0174-059 (20848) APPL INSTR 1: SAXOPHONE
MUSC 0174 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
I (1)
Orgill, E 1.0
MUSC 0174-078 (20827) APPL INSTR 1: VOICE
MUSC 0174 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
I (1)
Brown-Bonacci, M 1.0
MUSC 0174-080 (20824) APPL INSTR 1: VOICE
MUSC 0174 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
I (1)
Wilson, S 1.0
MUSC 0176-015 (20836) APPL INSTR 3: CLARINET
MUSC 0176 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
III (1)
Skinner, T 1.0
MUSC 0176-019 (20834) APPL INSTR 3: FLUTE
MUSC 0176 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
III (1)
Saloio, E 1.0
MUSC 0176-035 (21571) APPL INSTR 3: GUITAR
MUSC 0176 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
III (1)
Mason, J 1.0
MUSC 0176-055 (21568) APPL INSTR 3: PIANO
MUSC 0176 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
III (1)
Thomas, A 1.0
MUSC 0176-057 (21575) APPL INSTR 3: PIANO
MUSC 0176 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
III (1)
Taylor, A 1.0
MUSC 0176-059 (20849) APPL INSTR 3: SAXOPHONE
MUSC 0176 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
III (1)
Orgill, E 1.0
MUSC 0176-067 (21576) APPL INSTR 3: TRUMPET
MUSC 0176 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
III (1)
LaVoie, K 1.0
MUSC 0176-078 (20828) APPL INSTR 3: VOICE
MUSC 0176 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
III (1)
Brown-Bonacci, M 1.0
MUSC 0176-079 (20854) APPL INSTR 3: VOICE
MUSC 0176 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
III (1)
Brown-Bonacci, M 1.0
MUSC 0176-080 (21572) APPL INSTR 3: VOICE
MUSC 0176 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
III (1)
Brown-Bonacci, M 1.0
MUSC 0176-081 (21573) APPL INSTR 3: VOICE
MUSC 0176 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
III (1)
Brown-Bonacci, M 1.0
MUSC 0176-086 (21577) APPL INSTR 3: BASS
MUSC 0176 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
III (1)
Schwartz, J 1.0
MUSC 0177-078 (20859) APPL INSTR 4: VOICE
MUSC 0177 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
IV (1)
Brown-Bonacci, M 1.0
MUSC 0177-081 (20855) APPL INSTR 4: VOICE
MUSC 0177 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
IV (1)
Paulella Beard, L 1.0
MUSC 0191-001 (20711) CLINICAL FOUND. MUSIC THERAPY
MUSC 0191 CLINICAL FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC THERAPY (1)
An introduction to practical clinical skills required of the music therapist, including assessment, treatment planning, observation and data collection, and clinical documentation.��
PR STAFF W 12:35 PM-01:25 PM DOWER 251 1.0
MUSC 0200-001 (21254) MUSIC HISTORY I
MUSC 0200 MUSIC HISTORY I (3)
A chronological study of the history of musical styles showing the development of musical forms from the Middle Ages through the Baroque Era.
Lawson, S MWF 08:15 AM-09:05 AM DOWER 242 3.0
MUSC 0211-001 (21159) MUSIC THEORY III
MUSC 0211 MUSIC THEORY III (2)
A continuation of MUSC 0112 emphasizing the study of extended chords, chromatic harmony, modulation, and the continued development of analytical techniques.
PR Bonacci, A MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM DOWER 144 2.0
MUSC 0213-001 (21256) SIGHT SING/EAR TRNG.III
MUSC 0213 SIGHT SINGING AND EAR TRAINING III (2)
A continuation of MUSC 0114. Continued studies in intermediate musicianship skills emphasizing sight singing, ear training and rhythmic reading.
PR Blanchard, S MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM DOWER 2.0
MUSC 0214-083 (21578) COMPOSITION I
MUSC 0214 COMPOSITION I (1)
An introduction to basic compositional techniques in music. Creative work in smaller forms.
PR Bonacci, A 1.0
MUSC 0214-085 (21579) COMPOSITION I
MUSC 0214 COMPOSITION I (1)
An introduction to basic compositional techniques in music. Creative work in smaller forms.
PR Blanchard, S 1.0
MUSC 0214-087 (21581) COMPOSITION I
MUSC 0214 COMPOSITION I (1)
An introduction to basic compositional techniques in music. Creative work in smaller forms.
PR Loell, J 1.0
MUSC 0221-001 (20134) INTRO TO MUSIC EDUCATION
MUSC 0221 INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC EDUCATION (3)
This introductory course covers the history, curriculum, current topics, and developmentally appropriate methodologies in music education across PreK-12 grade levels.� Teacher candidates will be introduced to instructional and classroom management practices that reflect high expectations, accommodate a range of interests and abilities, and promote a safe learning environment in which diversity is respected.� Participants will explore best practices for creating diverse and engaging lesson activities, assessment and reflective practice, communicating with families and encouraging family participation, and collaborating with colleagues and the community.� 25-hours of documented field experience in the public schools are required.
Gibson, R TR 08:15 AM-09:30 AM DOWER 251 3.0
MUSC 0230-001 (20123) BASIC CONDUCTING
MUSC 0230 BASIC CONDUCTING (2)
Basic techniques of conducting including baton techniques; simple, compound, and asymmetrical meters; expression and interpretation through laboratory experiences.
PR LaVoie, K MW 03:00 PM-04:15 PM DOWER 120 2.0
MUSC 0240-001 (20129) MUSIC THEATRE WORKSHOP
MUSC 0240 CHAMBER ENSEMBLES (0.5)
Small ensembles structured according to student interest and available faculty expertise. Recently offered Chamber Ensembles: Guitar Ensemble, Low Brass Ensemble, Opera Workshop, Percussion Ensemble, Piano Ensemble, Saxophone Quartet, String Ensemble, Trombone Choir, Trumpet Ensemble, Vocal Jazz Ensemble, Women's Choir, and Woodwind Quartet. May be repeated for credit.
Brown-Bonacci, M TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM DOWER 134 .5
MUSC 0240-002 (20661) MUSICAL THEATRE PIT ORCHESTRA
MUSC 0240 CHAMBER ENSEMBLES (0.5)
Small ensembles structured according to student interest and available faculty expertise. Recently offered Chamber Ensembles: Guitar Ensemble, Low Brass Ensemble, Opera Workshop, Percussion Ensemble, Piano Ensemble, Saxophone Quartet, String Ensemble, Trombone Choir, Trumpet Ensemble, Vocal Jazz Ensemble, Women's Choir, and Woodwind Quartet. May be repeated for credit.
Bailey, S W 07:00 PM-09:00 PM DOWER 127 .5
MUSC 0240-004 (20133) CHAMBER ENSEMBLE (MIXED)
MUSC 0240 CHAMBER ENSEMBLES (0.5)
Small ensembles structured according to student interest and available faculty expertise. Recently offered Chamber Ensembles: Guitar Ensemble, Low Brass Ensemble, Opera Workshop, Percussion Ensemble, Piano Ensemble, Saxophone Quartet, String Ensemble, Trombone Choir, Trumpet Ensemble, Vocal Jazz Ensemble, Women's Choir, and Woodwind Quartet. May be repeated for credit.
Bailey, S F 03:00 PM-04:00 PM DOWER 134 .5
MUSC 0240-005 (21172) STRING QUINTET
MUSC 0240 CHAMBER ENSEMBLES (0.5)
Small ensembles structured according to student interest and available faculty expertise. Recently offered Chamber Ensembles: Guitar Ensemble, Low Brass Ensemble, Opera Workshop, Percussion Ensemble, Piano Ensemble, Saxophone Quartet, String Ensemble, Trombone Choir, Trumpet Ensemble, Vocal Jazz Ensemble, Women's Choir, and Woodwind Quartet. May be repeated for credit.
Foskitt, J T 05:00 PM-06:00 PM DOWER 120 .5
MUSC 0240-006 (20946) SAXOPHONE QUARTET
MUSC 0240 CHAMBER ENSEMBLES (0.5)
Small ensembles structured according to student interest and available faculty expertise. Recently offered Chamber Ensembles: Guitar Ensemble, Low Brass Ensemble, Opera Workshop, Percussion Ensemble, Piano Ensemble, Saxophone Quartet, String Ensemble, Trombone Choir, Trumpet Ensemble, Vocal Jazz Ensemble, Women's Choir, and Woodwind Quartet. May be repeated for credit.
Orgill, E DOWER 249 .5
MUSC 0240-007 (20993) FLUTE QUARTET
MUSC 0240 CHAMBER ENSEMBLES (0.5)
Small ensembles structured according to student interest and available faculty expertise. Recently offered Chamber Ensembles: Guitar Ensemble, Low Brass Ensemble, Opera Workshop, Percussion Ensemble, Piano Ensemble, Saxophone Quartet, String Ensemble, Trombone Choir, Trumpet Ensemble, Vocal Jazz Ensemble, Women's Choir, and Woodwind Quartet. May be repeated for credit.
Saloio, E DOWER .5
MUSC 0240-008 (21257) GOSPEL CHOIR
MUSC 0240 CHAMBER ENSEMBLES (0.5)
Small ensembles structured according to student interest and available faculty expertise. Recently offered Chamber Ensembles: Guitar Ensemble, Low Brass Ensemble, Opera Workshop, Percussion Ensemble, Piano Ensemble, Saxophone Quartet, String Ensemble, Trombone Choir, Trumpet Ensemble, Vocal Jazz Ensemble, Women's Choir, and Woodwind Quartet. May be repeated for credit.
Barber, F F 01:40 PM-02:55 PM DOWER 134 .5
MUSC 0240-009 (21274) PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE
MUSC 0240 CHAMBER ENSEMBLES (0.5)
Small ensembles structured according to student interest and available faculty expertise. Recently offered Chamber Ensembles: Guitar Ensemble, Low Brass Ensemble, Opera Workshop, Percussion Ensemble, Piano Ensemble, Saxophone Quartet, String Ensemble, Trombone Choir, Trumpet Ensemble, Vocal Jazz Ensemble, Women's Choir, and Woodwind Quartet. May be repeated for credit.
Coutsouridis, P .5
MUSC 0252-001 (21161) PIANO CLASS III
MUSC 0252 PIANO CLASS III (FOR MUSIC MAJORS)
(0.5) A keyboard class designed to develop practical playing skills. Begins with emphasis on fundamental piano techniques, moves through emphasis on chording, accompanying, and improvising and sight reading, and concludes with the learning of assigned compositions and the development of transposition skills.
Thomas, A TR 09:45 AM-10:45 AM DOWER .5
MUSC 0269-001 (20124) JAZZ ENSEMBLE
MUSC 0269 SMALL JAZZ ENSEMBLE (0.5)
A small jazz ensemble class. Emphasis on solo playing skills. Repertoire consists of a broad range of musical styles. Involves concert performance. By audition. May be repeated for credit.
Orgill, E TR 02:30 PM-03:30 PM DOWER .5
MUSC 0272-067 (20832) APPL INSTR 7: TRUMPET
MUSC 0272 APPLIED MUSIC (MINOR)
VII (0.5)
LaVoie, K .5
MUSC 0273-075 (21583) APPL INSTR 8: VIOLIN
MUSC 0273 APPLIED MUSIC (MINOR)
VIII (0.5)
Foskitt, J .5
MUSC 0274-022 (20858) APPL INSTR 5: HORN
MUSC 0274 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
V (2)
Chaloux, A 2.0
MUSC 0274-052 (20845) APPL INSTR 5: PERCUSSION
MUSC 0274 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
V (2)
Coutsouridis, P 2.0
MUSC 0274-059 (20850) APPL INSTR 5: SAXOPHONE
MUSC 0274 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
V (2)
Orgill, E 2.0
MUSC 0274-078 (20829) APPL INSTR 5: VOICE
MUSC 0274 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
V (2)
Brown-Bonacci, M 2.0
MUSC 0275-052 (20889) APPL INSTR 6: PERCUSSION
MUSC 0275 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
VI (2)
Coutsouridis, P 2.0
MUSC 0275-080 (21584) APPL INSTR 6: VOICE
MUSC 0275 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
VI (2)
Wilson, S 2.0
MUSC 0276-019 (20835) APPL INSTR 7: FLUTE
MUSC 0276 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
VII (2)
Saloio, E 2.0
MUSC 0276-034 (20825) APPL INSTR 7: GUITAR
MUSC 0276 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
VII (2)
Mason, J 2.0
MUSC 0276-035 (20846) APPL INSTR 7: GUITAR
MUSC 0276 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
VII (2)
Mason, J 2.0
MUSC 0276-036 (20820) APPL INSTR 7: GUITAR
MUSC 0276 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
VII (2)
Schwartz, J 2.0
MUSC 0276-055 (20863) APPL INSTR 7: PIANO
MUSC 0276 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
VII (2)
Thomas, A 2.0
MUSC 0276-059 (20851) APPL INSTR 7: SAXOPHONE
MUSC 0276 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
VII (2)
Orgill, E 2.0
MUSC 0276-060 (21570) APPL INSTR 7: SAXOPHONE
MUSC 0276 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
VII (2)
Orgill, E 2.0
MUSC 0276-078 (20856) APPL INSTR 7: VOICE
MUSC 0276 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
VII (2)
Brown-Bonacci, M 2.0
MUSC 0276-079 (21574) APPL INSTR 7: VOICE
MUSC 0276 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
VII (2)
Brown-Bonacci, M 2.0
MUSC 0277-080 (21585) APPL INSTR 8: VOICE
MUSC 0277 APPLIED MUSIC (MAJOR)
VIII (2)
Wilson, S 2.0
MUSC 0279-001 (20127) RECITAL ATTENDANCE AND PERFORMANCE
MUSC 0279 RECITAL ATTENDANCE AND PERFORMANCE (0.5)
All Music majors are required to complete 6 semesters (Music minor 3 semester) of MUSC 0279, Recital Attendance and Performance. Attendance is required at weekly studio classes and departmental recitals. Students are required to perform regularly in studio classes, and are required to perform at least once each year in a departmental recital. Music minors may perform at the discretion of their applied instructor. Music Education majors are exempt from MUSC 0279 in the semester which they are enrolled in their practicum. Pass/Fail.
Coutsouridis, P M 05:00 PM-06:00 PM DOWER 134 .5
MUSC 0280-001 (20663) INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC STUDIO
MUSC 0280 MUSIC STUDIO (0)
Studio class is designed to instill the knowledge and develop the skills necessary to prepare the student to pursue a professional career in music.� This is a pass/fail course.
Coutsouridis, P R 03:45 PM-04:45 PM DOWER 134 .0
MUSC 0280-002 (20478) VOICE STUDIO
MUSC 0280 MUSIC STUDIO (0)
Studio class is designed to instill the knowledge and develop the skills necessary to prepare the student to pursue a professional career in music.� This is a pass/fail course.
Brown-Bonacci, M T 03:45 PM-04:45 PM DOWER 134 .0
MUSC 0280-003 (21275) COMPOSITION STUDIO
MUSC 0280 MUSIC STUDIO (0)
Studio class is designed to instill the knowledge and develop the skills necessary to prepare the student to pursue a professional career in music.� This is a pass/fail course.
STAFF .0
MUSC 0280-004 (21258) PIANO STUDIO
MUSC 0280 MUSIC STUDIO (0)
Studio class is designed to instill the knowledge and develop the skills necessary to prepare the student to pursue a professional career in music.� This is a pass/fail course.
Thomas, A R 03:45 PM-04:45 PM DOWER 120 .0
MUSC 0280-005 (21276) STRING/GUITAR STUDIO
MUSC 0280 MUSIC STUDIO (0)
Studio class is designed to instill the knowledge and develop the skills necessary to prepare the student to pursue a professional career in music.� This is a pass/fail course.
Mason, J R 03:45 PM-04:45 PM DOWER 127 .0
MUSC 0291-001 (21157) NEUROLOGIC SYS, IN MUSC THRPY
MUSC 0291 NEUROLOGIC SYSTEMS IN MUSIC THERAPY (2)
An introduction to neurophysiology and the neuropsychology of music therapy.� Includes theory, research, and clinical applications for music therapy with adults and older adults who have neurological disorders through traditional and experiential learning.
PR Honig, T MW 10:25 AM-11:15 AM DOWER 251 2.0
MUSC 0299-001 (21162) ST: MUSIC TECHNOLOGY FUNDAMENT Loell, J TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM
TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM
DOWER 151
DOWER 195
3.0
MUSC 0301-001 (21255) MUSIC IN THE BAROQUE/CLASSICAL
MUSC 0301 MUSIC IN THE BAROQUE AND CLASSICAL ERAS (3)
A study of forms and styles of music from 1600-1800 with emphasis on the music of Monteverdi, Handel, Bach, Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven.
PR Lawson, S TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM DOWER 242 3.0
MUSC 0312-001 (20655) FORM AND ANALYSIS
MUSC 0312 FORM AND ANALYSIS (2)
An introduction to the analysis of musical forms. Works analyzed: 17th century to late 19th century compositions.
PR Taylor, A MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM DOWER 242 2.0
MUSC 0314-085 (21580) ADVANCED COMPOSITION 1
MUSC 0314 ADVANCED COMPOSITION I (1)
Continuation of MUSC 0216. Advanced studies in composition with a goal of developing effective personal technique and methodology. Public performance of original compositions required.
PR Blanchard, S 1.0
MUSC 0315-087 (21582) ADVANCED COMPOSITION II
MUSC 0315 ADVANCED COMPOSITION II (1)
Continuation of MUSC 0216. Advanced studies in composition with a goal of developing effective personal technique and methodology. Public performance of original compositions required.
PR Loell, J 1.0
MUSC 0328-001 (21541) PRACTICUM:MUSIC (K-12)
MUSC 0328 PRACTICUM: MUSIC K-12 (12)
A full-time apprenticeship with one or more co-operating practitioners at two different grade levels (elementary, secondary), supervised by college music faculty. A minimum of 300 hours in the practicum will be documented. Periodic on campus seminars are required.
Gibson, R
MUSC 0329-001 (21282) MUSIC PRACTICUM SEMINAR
MUSC 0329 MUSIC PRACTICUM SEMINAR (1)
This seminar is taken concurrently with the practicum and provides an opportunity for music candidates to reflect on their teaching experiences and examine a variety of topics in music education.� Candidates will collaborate to review and evaluate pedagogical strategies, curriculum, and assessments linked to student learning.� They will explore creative solutions to situations in their teaching, examine current research in the field, and review educational innovations.� Strategies for building professional relationships among school and community members are also discussed.
Gibson, R 1.0
MUSC 0332-001 (21160) INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC ED METHODS
MUSC 0332 INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC EDUCATION METHODS (3)
This field-based methods course surveys appropriate instrumental literature for elementary, middle and high school programs.� Students develop skills that will enable them to create and maintain a collaborative and cross-curricular learning environment.� They will learn various standards-based teaching methods specific to child development and diverse learning styles as appropriate to the instrumental classroom setting, create effective curricula and lesson plans, and learn rehearsal techniques that employ a variety of assessment strategies specific to the instrumental classroom.� Students will demonstrate teaching strategies through practical teaching projects and field-based labs, and will write reflective evaluations.� Drawing from a variety of classroom management strategies, students will prepare lesson plans with effective routines and procedures that engage and challenge all learners, accommodate a range of needs and abilities, and promote positive behavior.� 25-hours of documented field experience in public schools are required.
PR LaVoie, K TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM DOWER 245 3.0
MUSC 0376-065 (21587) APPL INSTR 7: CELLO
MUSC 0376 APPLIED MUSIC (PERFORMANCE CONCENTRATION)
VII (2)
Bailey, S 2.0
MUSC 0376-077 (21586) APPL INSTR 7: CELLO
MUSC 0376 APPLIED MUSIC (PERFORMANCE CONCENTRATION)
VII (2)
Wade, A 2.0
MUSC 0389-001 (21259) CLIN IMPRV I:PRINCPL AND TECHNQ
MUSC 0389 CLINICAL IMPROVISATION I: PRINCIPLES AND TECHNIQUES (2)
Experiential course exploring the theory and practice of clinical improvisation in music therapy.� Students learn and apply therapeutic improvisation techniques using acoustic and electronic instruments, laying a foundation for in-depth clinical work in a variety of clinical settings.� Emphasizes the therapeutic relationship in clinical improvisation.��
PR Honig, T W 05:00 PM-06:40 PM DOWER 251 2.0
MUSC 0392-001 (21158) MUSIC THERAPY:MENTAL HLTHCR
MUSC 0392 MUSIC THERAPY IN MENTAL HEALTHCARE (2)
Theory, research, and clinical skills for current music therapy practice in mental healthcare for children, adolescents, and adults who have mood, behavioral, psychotic, personality, and addictive disorders.�Topics include the continuum of care and strengths-based music therapy approaches.�Emphasis is placed on the therapist's self in sociocultural context.��
PR Honig, T MW 11:30 AM-12:20 PM DOWER 251 2.0
MUSC 0395-001 (21260) CLIN. MUSIC THERAPY PRACT
MUSC 0395 CLINICAL MUSIC THERAPY PRACTICUM (1)
Supervised clinical experience in music therapy.�Students provide music therapy services in a community setting with supervision by a board-certified therapist.�Includes music therapy assesment, treatment planning and implementation, and clinical documentation with a variety of clinical populations and age groups.�May be repeated for credit.�Open to Music Therapy majors only.
PR STAFF 1.0
MUSC 0396-001 (21261) MUSIC THERAPY PRACT SEMINAR
MUSC 0396 MUSIC THERAPY PRACTICUM SEMINAR (0)
Seminar to support fieldwork experiences while enrolled in MUSC 0395, including clinical writing, skill-sharing, and reflective processing.�Topics include researching and orienting to a new clinical setting, implementation of the music therapy treatment process, clinical documentation, and peer supervision.�May be repeated for credit.�Open to Music Therapy majors only.
PR STAFF M 12:35 PM-01:25 PM DOWER 251 .0
Nursing
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
NURS 0201-001 (20521) FUND OF PROF NURSING
NURS 0201 FUNDAMENTALS OF PROFESSIONAL NURSING PRACTICE (6)
� This course examines the underlying theoretical concepts and expands on prior knowledge and skills from sciences and the humanities. The core focus is on utilizing the nursing process, health assessment techniques and evidence based practice to provide quality, individualized, compassionate and safe care to the adult/older adult populations and their families. Competency in the application of basic nursing skills and safety are key elements integrated into the clinical and simulation/laboratory settings.� 3 hour lecture, 6 hour clinical, 3 hour lab.
PR Pappas, J TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 213 6.0
NURS 0201-002 (21290) FUND OF PROF NURSING
NURS 0201 FUNDAMENTALS OF PROFESSIONAL NURSING PRACTICE (6)
� This course examines the underlying theoretical concepts and expands on prior knowledge and skills from sciences and the humanities. The core focus is on utilizing the nursing process, health assessment techniques and evidence based practice to provide quality, individualized, compassionate and safe care to the adult/older adult populations and their families. Competency in the application of basic nursing skills and safety are key elements integrated into the clinical and simulation/laboratory settings.� 3 hour lecture, 6 hour clinical, 3 hour lab.
PR Pappas, J TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM WILSN 213 6.0
NURS 0312-001 (20763) NURS CARE ADULT/OLDER ADULT I
NURS 0312 NURSING CARE OF THE ADULT AND OLDER ADULT I (5)
This is the first of two courses that focuses on the care of the adult and older adult patient with acute and/or chronic illness. Content includes using critical thinking to make appropriate clinical decisions for developing and implementing evidence based professional nursing interventions to achieve appropriate patient outcomes. The integrating of theoretical and clinical knowledge in the care of adults/older adults with chronic illness, synthesizing laboratory data, and the setting of priorities will be incorporated. This course addresses relevant criteria of the AACN Essentials of Baccalaureate Education # I, III, IV and IX)�� (see www.aacn.nche.edu/Education/bacessen.htm ).� 2 hours classroom; 6 hours clinical/week; 3 hour SimLab/week.
PR Scanlon, M TR 12:45 PM-01:45 PM WILSN 213 5.0
NURS 0321-001 (20796) NURS CARE CHILDREN/FAMILIES
NURS 0321 NURSING CARE OF CHILDREN AND FAMILES (4)
� Emphasis is on the development of clinical decision making skills related to nursing care of childrearing families with a particular focus on anticipatory guidance, prevention, intervention and health restoration. This course will also provide experience in clinical and simulation learning environments for the application of theory from nursing and related disciplines to child health.� The course will stress the use of critical thinking skills to meet the physiological and psychological needs of emerging families and will provide opportunities to care for these clients in different venues across the wellness-illness continuum.� 2 lecture hours, 6 clinical/lab/simulation hours per week.
PR Rivera, J F 11:00 AM-12:40 PM WILSN 213 4.0
NURS 0322-001 (20795) NURS CARE PERINTL WMN/NEWBORNS
NURS 0322 NURSING CARE OF PERINATAL WOMEN AND NEWBORNS (4)
� Focuses on nursing interventions to support the holistic health needs of women and newborns from conception to postpartum and includes women's health reproductive topics. The course will stress the use of critical thinking skills to meet the physiological and psychological needs of emerging families and will provide opportunities to care for these clients in different venues across the wellness-illness continuum.� 2 lecture hours, 6 clinical/lab hours per week.
PR Kuhnly, J W 11:00 AM-12:40 PM WILSN 213 4.0
NURS 0335-001 (20554) PATHOPHYS AND PHARMA I
NURS 0335 PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY I (3)
This course explores major elements of altered disease processes at the cellular, tissue, and organ levels and the pharmacological agents used to treat, manage, prevent or cure diseases across the lifespan. The course will address the pathological changes in the body and integrate this knowledge with pharmacological therapy and safe medication management. Clinical, legal and ethical decision making related to drug administration will be covered.
PR Scott, S TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM WILSN 213 3.0
NURS 0355-001 (20764) NURSING LEADERSHIP
NURS 0355 NURSING LEADERSHIP (3)
Focuses on the role of the professional nurse in a leadership/management position. The course examines how the professional nurse works collaboratively within the structure of a healthcare organization. Emphasis will be on leadership and organizational theories and their relationship to managing people, positive problem solving/decision making, conflict resolution, appropriate delegation and effective communication with all members of the health care team. The use of self-assessment to facilitate the development of leadership/management skills will be incorporated.
PR Rivera, J F 09:20 AM-10:35 AM
W 09:20 AM-10:35 AM
WILSN 101
WILSN 213
3.0
Philosophy
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
PHIL 0101-001 (21061) INTRO TO SOC-POL PHIL
PHIL 0101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (3)
Introduction to philosophy by studying the social and political ideas, images, and language of contemporary culture through topics such as liberty, order and freedom, values and projects of late 20th century cultural and social movements, and the institutions of socio-political life. Readings of primary sources, oral presentations, and significant writing required. Special attention given to improving critical analysis.
Harte, L MWF 08:15 AM-09:05 AM WILSN 304 3.0 LPA
PHIL 0101-002 (21062) INTRO TO SOC-POL PHIL
PHIL 0101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (3)
Introduction to philosophy by studying the social and political ideas, images, and language of contemporary culture through topics such as liberty, order and freedom, values and projects of late 20th century cultural and social movements, and the institutions of socio-political life. Readings of primary sources, oral presentations, and significant writing required. Special attention given to improving critical analysis.
Harte, L MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM WILSN 304 3.0 LPA
PHIL 0102-001 (20593) INTRO TO ETHICS
PHIL 0102 INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS (3)
Introduction to philosophy through consideration of classic and contemporary theories of morality and the best life. Topics may include the concepts of freedom, happiness, justice, dignity, virtue, right/wrong, good/bad, alienation, loneliness, obligation, responsibility, rights and duties, as well as the structure of morality. Special attention is given to the fundamentals of critical analysis.
Katler, R MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM WILSN 300 3.0 LPA
PHIL 0102-002 (20788) INTRO TO ETHICS
PHIL 0102 INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS (3)
Introduction to philosophy through consideration of classic and contemporary theories of morality and the best life. Topics may include the concepts of freedom, happiness, justice, dignity, virtue, right/wrong, good/bad, alienation, loneliness, obligation, responsibility, rights and duties, as well as the structure of morality. Special attention is given to the fundamentals of critical analysis.
Katler, R MW 03:10 PM-04:25 PM WILSN 300 3.0 LPA
PHIL 0103-001 (20701) SYMBOLIC LOGIC I
PHIL 0103 SYMBOLIC LOGIC I (3)
An introduction to standard, first-order propositional calculus and natural deduction. Topics to include: identifying and classifying inference as emotive, inductive or deductive; judging inference as tautologous, contingent, or contradictory; distinguishing between the truth of statements and the validity of arguments; identifying valid argument forms and substitution rules; evaluating truth-functions using natural deduction; evaluating arguments using alternative truth table techniques, forcing, direct proof, indirect proof, conditional proof, and the strengthened rule of conditional proof.
Tetrault, G TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 314 3.0 ARSN
PHIL 0104-001 (20167) GREAT PHIL ISSUES
PHIL 0104 GREAT PHILOSOPHICAL ISSUES (3)
Introduction to philosophy through consideration of historically recurrent themes such as the concepts of knowledge/belief/faith, the natures of appearance and reality, the mind/body problem, freedom, free will, determinism, social justice, and moral values. Special attention is given to the fundamentals of critical analysis and the interpretation of original texts.
Katler, R TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 300 3.0 LPA
PHIL 0109-001 (21063) INTRO TO PHIL OF RELIGION
PHIL 0109 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION (3)
Introduction to philosophy through analysis of religious beliefs and values. Significant topics include the problem of the existence of god(s), the nature of faith, the nature of god(s) and reality, the question of religious revelation, the reliability of religious experience, as well as the sociological and psychology import of religious belief. Special attention is given to the fundamentals of critical analysis and the interpretation of original texts.
STAFF TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM WILSN 300 3.0 LPA
PHIL 0200-001 (21064) ST: THE ART OF JUDO
PHIL 0200 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY: (3)
Careful analytical treatment of selected philosophical issues, perspectives, or themes chosen for their timely interest. Significant topics such as Marxism, Eastern philosophies, myth and reality, minds and machines, and philosophy and the arts (music, film, drama, literature, painting, design, or sculpture; aesthetics).
PR Art, B M 01:40 PM-04:10 PM 3.0
PHIL 0200-002 (21065) ST: THE ART OF JUDO
PHIL 0200 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY: (3)
Careful analytical treatment of selected philosophical issues, perspectives, or themes chosen for their timely interest. Significant topics such as Marxism, Eastern philosophies, myth and reality, minds and machines, and philosophy and the arts (music, film, drama, literature, painting, design, or sculpture; aesthetics).
PR Art, B R 02:15 PM-04:45 PM WILSN 3.0
Political Science
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
POLS 0101-001 (20010) AMERICAN NATL GOVT
POLS 0101 AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT (3)
This course examines basic theories, key concepts, and perennial debates in American national politics from the founding to today. It traces the development and role of the institutions, processes and policies, changes in political culture, notions of citizenship, and marginalized voices as they shape and are shaped by the American political system.
Marotta, M ONLINE 3.0 HSGV
POLS 0101-002 (20698) AMERICAN NATL GOVT
POLS 0101 AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT (3)
This course examines basic theories, key concepts, and perennial debates in American national politics from the founding to today. It traces the development and role of the institutions, processes and policies, changes in political culture, notions of citizenship, and marginalized voices as they shape and are shaped by the American political system.
Marotta, M ONLINE 3.0 HSGV
POLS 0101-004 (20025) AMERICAN NATL GOVT
POLS 0101 AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT (3)
This course examines basic theories, key concepts, and perennial debates in American national politics from the founding to today. It traces the development and role of the institutions, processes and policies, changes in political culture, notions of citizenship, and marginalized voices as they shape and are shaped by the American political system.
Steinberg, B MWF 12:35 PM-01:25 PM WILSN 300 3.0 HSGV
POLS 0101-005 (20697) AMERICAN NATL GOVT
POLS 0101 AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT (3)
This course examines basic theories, key concepts, and perennial debates in American national politics from the founding to today. It traces the development and role of the institutions, processes and policies, changes in political culture, notions of citizenship, and marginalized voices as they shape and are shaped by the American political system.
Steinberg, B MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM BATES 126 3.0 HSGV
POLS 0101-006 (20033) AMERICAN NATL GOVT
POLS 0101 AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT (3)
This course examines basic theories, key concepts, and perennial debates in American national politics from the founding to today. It traces the development and role of the institutions, processes and policies, changes in political culture, notions of citizenship, and marginalized voices as they shape and are shaped by the American political system.
Brown, H MW 03:10 PM-04:25 PM BATES 113 3.0 HSGV
POLS 0101-007 (20700) AMERICAN NATL GOVT
POLS 0101 AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT (3)
This course examines basic theories, key concepts, and perennial debates in American national politics from the founding to today. It traces the development and role of the institutions, processes and policies, changes in political culture, notions of citizenship, and marginalized voices as they shape and are shaped by the American political system.
Brown, H TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM WILSN 3.0 HSGV
POLS 0101-008 (21560) AMERICAN NATL GOVT
POLS 0101 AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT (3)
This course examines basic theories, key concepts, and perennial debates in American national politics from the founding to today. It traces the development and role of the institutions, processes and policies, changes in political culture, notions of citizenship, and marginalized voices as they shape and are shaped by the American political system.
Marotta, M TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM
First-Year COURSE
WILSN 3.0 HSGV
POLS 0101-H01 (21066) HNRS: AMERICAN NATL GOVT
POLS 0101 AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT (3)
This course examines basic theories, key concepts, and perennial debates in American national politics from the founding to today. It traces the development and role of the institutions, processes and policies, changes in political culture, notions of citizenship, and marginalized voices as they shape and are shaped by the American political system.
Jo, Y MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM MOD 3.0 HSGV
POLS 0103-002 (21067) STATE AND LOCAL GOVT
POLS 0103 STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT (3)
This course examines intergovernmental relationships in the United States federal system and investigates factors that lead to state and local variations in political institutions and public policies.� Students will learn how they can have a greater voice in state and local governmental decision-making.
STAFF TR 08:15 AM-09:30 AM BATES 125 3.0 HSGV
POLS 0105-001 (20011) LAW,COURTS AND POLITICS
POLS 0105 LAW, COURTS AND POLITICS (3)
An introductory study of the way courts in the U.S. influence political and social policies. Topics include the judicial process, judicial decision-making, and court rulings in such controversial areas as abortion, affirmative action, school desegregation, capital punishment, gender discrimination, rights to sexual privacy, rights of the disabled, and voting rights.
STAFF ONLINE 3.0 SOCU
POLS 0105-002 (20023) LAW,COURTS AND POLITICS
POLS 0105 LAW, COURTS AND POLITICS (3)
An introductory study of the way courts in the U.S. influence political and social policies. Topics include the judicial process, judicial decision-making, and court rulings in such controversial areas as abortion, affirmative action, school desegregation, capital punishment, gender discrimination, rights to sexual privacy, rights of the disabled, and voting rights.
STAFF TR 03:45 PM-05:00 PM BATES 111 3.0 SOCU
POLS 0110-001 (20453) INTRODUCTION TO ASIAN STUDIES
POLS 0110 INTRODUCTION TO ASIAN STUDIES (3)
This course is intended to help student obtain broad knowledge about Asia in various disciplines and provide a basis for understanding different subjects in Asian Studies.� Among the topics of discussion are culture, history, economy, and foreign relations of many different regions and countries in Asia.� The course is required for students who choose Asian Studies as their minor and is part of the Common Core (Global Diversity).
Jo, Y MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM WILSN 401 3.0 GDIV
POLS 0110-002 (20454) INTRODUCTION TO ASIAN STUDIES
POLS 0110 INTRODUCTION TO ASIAN STUDIES (3)
This course is intended to help student obtain broad knowledge about Asia in various disciplines and provide a basis for understanding different subjects in Asian Studies.� Among the topics of discussion are culture, history, economy, and foreign relations of many different regions and countries in Asia.� The course is required for students who choose Asian Studies as their minor and is part of the Common Core (Global Diversity).
Harte, L MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM
First-Year COURSE
WILSN 304 3.0 GDIV
POLS 0206-001 (20026) POLITICAL ANALYSIS
POLS 0206 POLITICAL ANALYSIS (3)
This course provides an introduction to the research methods used in political science, both quantitative and qualitative.�Emphasis will be placed on such areas as: philosophy of social science, 'scientific' research methods; theoretical and methodological debates in the discipline; and the skills necessary to reading critically, writing intelligently, and analyzing research cogently.
Brown, H MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM BATES 113 3.0
POLS 0208-001 (21431) CONSTITUTIONAL LAW
POLS 0208 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (3)
Examination of the constitutional powers of Congress, the President and the federal judiciary, and the relationship of the national government to the state governments, as defined by the text of the Constitution and Supreme Court decisions. Topics include the war power of the President, the expansion of the powers of the national government under the commerce clause, the Court's assertation of judicial review, and the regulatory and eminent domain powers of the state governments.
STAFF TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM REMSYC 3.0
POLS 0209-001 (20022) INTERNAT'L RELATIONS
POLS 0209 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (3)
An examination of sovereignty - a key concept in international relations. The course will focus on the emergence of sovereignty in the long sixteenth century and its sources in economics, ideology, military technology and personality. The same sources will be analyzed in their present form to prognosticate about the continuity of and basic challenges to sovereignty today. The final portion of the course will look at the various international theories of international relations from the viewpoints of realism, pluralism and class conflict theories and their protections of sovereignty in the future. Theories will be related to ongoing conflicts in international relations.
Steinberg, B MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM WILSN 211 3.0 SOCU/GDIV
POLS 0215-001 (20028) AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT
POLS 0215 AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT (3)
Explores the origin and development of political ideas and practices in the United States from the seventeenth century to the present, with emphasis on their influence on the present. Places American political thought in the context of western political thought, and traces the tensions that have existed within it including between the individual and community, liberty and equality, liberalism and democracy, theory and practice. Other themes include rights, justice, legitimacy, and power.
Marotta, M TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM WILSN 300 3.0
POLS 0224-001 (21069) POLITICS/DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
POLS 0224 POLITICS OF DEVELOPING COUNTRIES (3)
This course provides an introduction to issues and controversies surrounding political and economic development in the 'Non-Western' world through a survey of contemporary theories and the use of country case studies.� Emphasis will be placed on issues such as democratization, the role of tradition and culture in economic and political development, human rights, industrialization, the challenges of globalization, environmental vulnerability, and the legacies of colonialism.
Brown, H TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM BATES 111 3.0
POLS 0318-001 (20694) PUBLIC MANAGEMENT SKILLS
POLS 0318 PUBLIC MANAGEMENT SKILLS (3)
This course examines public management responsibilities and practical approaches to becoming an effective and ethical public manager.�Management challenges, including ones unique to public managers, will be explored, and students will discover tools available to meet these challenges.�Among other topics of discussion are best practices in essential public management competencies, including supervision, communication, contracting, budgeting and goal setting.
DiStefano, C W 12:35 PM-01:25 PM
Hybrid
WILSN 317 3.0
POLS 0323-001 (21588) ST: MODEL UN AND INT'L RELATIONS
POLS 0323 SELECTED TOPICS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE (3)
An advanced course that explores a specialized topic in the discipline. Selected Topics courses may count toward one, or more, of the fields of concentrations depending upon the particular course content. Students may take POLS 0323 more than once.
PR Steinberg, B MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM BATES 125 3.0
Psychology
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
PSYC 0101-001 (21322) INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY
PSYC 0101 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (3)
Overview of the basic theories and facts of human behavior and mental life. Topics include the scientific method, the physiological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and memory, development, personality, social psychology, and abnormal behavior. Psychological knowledge is related to daily problems and everyday life. This course is a prerequisite to all other psychology courses.
Bressler, E TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM WILSN 112 3.0 SOCU
PSYC 0101-002 (20049) INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY
PSYC 0101 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (3)
Overview of the basic theories and facts of human behavior and mental life. Topics include the scientific method, the physiological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and memory, development, personality, social psychology, and abnormal behavior. Psychological knowledge is related to daily problems and everyday life. This course is a prerequisite to all other psychology courses.
Andrade, L MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM WILSN 116A 3.0 SOCU
PSYC 0101-003 (20176) INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY
PSYC 0101 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (3)
Overview of the basic theories and facts of human behavior and mental life. Topics include the scientific method, the physiological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and memory, development, personality, social psychology, and abnormal behavior. Psychological knowledge is related to daily problems and everyday life. This course is a prerequisite to all other psychology courses.
Andrade, L MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM WILSN 116A 3.0 SOCU
PSYC 0101-004 (21323) INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY
PSYC 0101 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (3)
Overview of the basic theories and facts of human behavior and mental life. Topics include the scientific method, the physiological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and memory, development, personality, social psychology, and abnormal behavior. Psychological knowledge is related to daily problems and everyday life. This course is a prerequisite to all other psychology courses.
Bressler, E TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM ELY 346 3.0 SOCU
PSYC 0101-005 (21206) INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY
PSYC 0101 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (3)
Overview of the basic theories and facts of human behavior and mental life. Topics include the scientific method, the physiological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and memory, development, personality, social psychology, and abnormal behavior. Psychological knowledge is related to daily problems and everyday life. This course is a prerequisite to all other psychology courses.
Reyes, J MWF 12:35 PM-01:25 PM WILSN 116A 3.0 SOCU
PSYC 0101-007 (20473) INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY
PSYC 0101 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (3)
Overview of the basic theories and facts of human behavior and mental life. Topics include the scientific method, the physiological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and memory, development, personality, social psychology, and abnormal behavior. Psychological knowledge is related to daily problems and everyday life. This course is a prerequisite to all other psychology courses.
DesRochers, R ONLINE 3.0 SOCU
PSYC 0101-008 (21209) INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY
PSYC 0101 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (3)
Overview of the basic theories and facts of human behavior and mental life. Topics include the scientific method, the physiological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and memory, development, personality, social psychology, and abnormal behavior. Psychological knowledge is related to daily problems and everyday life. This course is a prerequisite to all other psychology courses.
Hart, C ONLINE 3.0 SOCU
PSYC 0101-009 (20474) INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY
PSYC 0101 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (3)
Overview of the basic theories and facts of human behavior and mental life. Topics include the scientific method, the physiological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and memory, development, personality, social psychology, and abnormal behavior. Psychological knowledge is related to daily problems and everyday life. This course is a prerequisite to all other psychology courses.
DesRochers, R ONLINE 3.0 SOCU
PSYC 0101-H01 (20922) HNRS: INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY
PSYC 0101 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (3)
Overview of the basic theories and facts of human behavior and mental life. Topics include the scientific method, the physiological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and memory, development, personality, social psychology, and abnormal behavior. Psychological knowledge is related to daily problems and everyday life. This course is a prerequisite to all other psychology courses.
Williams, S MW 03:10 PM-04:25 PM WILSN 116 3.0 SOCU
PSYC 0201-001 (20042) THEO OF PERSONALITY
PSYC 0201 THEORIES OF PERSONALITY (3)
The major theories of personality, including those of Freud, Jung, Sullivan, Allport, and Rogers, and the evidence used to support them. Comparisons and contrasts of these theories are made and implications drawn will be discussed and applied to counseling, psychotherapy, and education.
PR Morrison, N MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM WILSN 112 3.0
PSYC 0201-003 (20056) THEO OF PERSONALITY
PSYC 0201 THEORIES OF PERSONALITY (3)
The major theories of personality, including those of Freud, Jung, Sullivan, Allport, and Rogers, and the evidence used to support them. Comparisons and contrasts of these theories are made and implications drawn will be discussed and applied to counseling, psychotherapy, and education.
PR Lin, P MWF 08:15 AM-09:05 AM WILSN 116 3.0
PSYC 0201-004 (20058) THEO OF PERSONALITY
PSYC 0201 THEORIES OF PERSONALITY (3)
The major theories of personality, including those of Freud, Jung, Sullivan, Allport, and Rogers, and the evidence used to support them. Comparisons and contrasts of these theories are made and implications drawn will be discussed and applied to counseling, psychotherapy, and education.
PR Lin, P MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM WILSN 116 3.0
PSYC 0202-002 (20050) CHILD DEVELOPMENT
PSYC 0202 CHILD DEVELOPMENT (3)
This course explores child growth and development from conception through childhood.� Emphasis is on principles underlying physical, cognitive, social and emotional development.� Using contemporary theory, research, and methods relevant to developmental psychology, the class explores individual differences and the sociocultural context of development, in order to learn how to optimize the domains of development for all children.�� The objective is to deepen students' understanding of and respect for children and the families, educators and communities that nurture them.
PR Zhang, H TR 08:15 AM-09:30 AM WILSN 116A 3.0
PSYC 0202-003 (20052) CHILD DEVELOPMENT
PSYC 0202 CHILD DEVELOPMENT (3)
This course explores child growth and development from conception through childhood.� Emphasis is on principles underlying physical, cognitive, social and emotional development.� Using contemporary theory, research, and methods relevant to developmental psychology, the class explores individual differences and the sociocultural context of development, in order to learn how to optimize the domains of development for all children.�� The objective is to deepen students' understanding of and respect for children and the families, educators and communities that nurture them.
PR Zhang, H TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 109 3.0
PSYC 0202-004 (21210) CHILD DEVELOPMENT
PSYC 0202 CHILD DEVELOPMENT (3)
This course explores child growth and development from conception through childhood.� Emphasis is on principles underlying physical, cognitive, social and emotional development.� Using contemporary theory, research, and methods relevant to developmental psychology, the class explores individual differences and the sociocultural context of development, in order to learn how to optimize the domains of development for all children.�� The objective is to deepen students' understanding of and respect for children and the families, educators and communities that nurture them.
PR Gebelt, J ONLINE 3.0
PSYC 0202-006 (20491) CHILD DEVELOPMENT
PSYC 0202 CHILD DEVELOPMENT (3)
This course explores child growth and development from conception through childhood.� Emphasis is on principles underlying physical, cognitive, social and emotional development.� Using contemporary theory, research, and methods relevant to developmental psychology, the class explores individual differences and the sociocultural context of development, in order to learn how to optimize the domains of development for all children.�� The objective is to deepen students' understanding of and respect for children and the families, educators and communities that nurture them.
PR Zhang, H TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM WILSN 112 3.0
PSYC 0202-H01 (20039) HNRS: CHILD DEVELOPMENT
PSYC 0202 CHILD DEVELOPMENT (3)
This course explores child growth and development from conception through childhood.� Emphasis is on principles underlying physical, cognitive, social and emotional development.� Using contemporary theory, research, and methods relevant to developmental psychology, the class explores individual differences and the sociocultural context of development, in order to learn how to optimize the domains of development for all children.�� The objective is to deepen students' understanding of and respect for children and the families, educators and communities that nurture them.
PR Shelley, L MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM WILSN 116A 3.0
PSYC 0203-001 (21212) ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT
PSYC 0203 ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT (3)
Focuses on the scientific study of the biological, cognitive, social and emotional changes that occur during adolescence, and how development is impacted by sociocultural contexts.� This includes the examination of topics such as puberty, identity formation, self-management, sexuality, family relationships, peer relationships, moral development and decision-making.� This course will also discuss contemporary challenges facing adolescents.� The objective is to deepen students' understanding of adolescence as a developmental period.
PR Shelley, L ONLINE 3.0
PSYC 0203-002 (20060) ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT
PSYC 0203 ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT (3)
Focuses on the scientific study of the biological, cognitive, social and emotional changes that occur during adolescence, and how development is impacted by sociocultural contexts.� This includes the examination of topics such as puberty, identity formation, self-management, sexuality, family relationships, peer relationships, moral development and decision-making.� This course will also discuss contemporary challenges facing adolescents.� The objective is to deepen students' understanding of adolescence as a developmental period.
PR Gebelt, J TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 112 3.0
PSYC 0203-003 (20537) ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT
PSYC 0203 ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT (3)
Focuses on the scientific study of the biological, cognitive, social and emotional changes that occur during adolescence, and how development is impacted by sociocultural contexts.� This includes the examination of topics such as puberty, identity formation, self-management, sexuality, family relationships, peer relationships, moral development and decision-making.� This course will also discuss contemporary challenges facing adolescents.� The objective is to deepen students' understanding of adolescence as a developmental period.
PR Gebelt, J TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM WILSN 112 3.0
PSYC 0204-001 (21205) SELF CONTROL AND STRESS MGMT
PSYC 0204 STRESS, COPING, AND WELL-BEING (3)
The goal of this course is to give an in-depth understanding of the theoretical and empirical work on stress (e.g., negative life events, psychological and physiological stress), coping, and overall well-being. The determinants of stress and its manifestations--physiological, behavioral, and cognitive--will also be examined in relation to health, together with a focus on reducing stress reactions, building resilience and positive stress mindsets, as well as procedures for stress management, including relaxation techniques, meditation, biofeedback, and cognitive-behavioral strategies.
PR Williams, S ONLINE 3.0
PSYC 0207-001 (20538) LIFESPAN DEVELOPMENT
PSYC 0207 LIFESPAN DEVELOPMENT (3)
Explores human development from a variety of psychological perspectives. The entire lifespan, from conception to death, will be discussed, covering both theoretical and empirical issues. Material will cover the three major aspects of development: physical, cognitive, and social-emotional development.
Cemborski, T TR 03:45 PM-05:00 PM WILSN 116 3.0
PSYC 0208-001 (20048) ADULT DEVELOPMENT AND AGING
PSYC 0208 ADULT DEVELOPMENT AND AGING (3)
A study of human development through the early, middle, and later adult years. The course will focus on the maturational and environmental determinants of changes in sensation and perception, learning and memory, intelligence, cognition, and personality.
PR Cemborski, T TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM WILSN 116 3.0
PSYC 0212-001 (20061) FROM DISORDER TO ORIENTATION
PSYC 0212 FROM DISORDER TO ORIENTATION (3)
Takes an in-depth look at how the field of psychology has historically dealt with the issue of sexual orientation.� Applicable psychological theories, and their subsequent evolution or demise, are discussed in the context of history.� Among issues discussed are the nature vs. nurture controversy, heterosexism, homophobia, unearned privilege, oppression, visibility, and relationship/family structures.� Differences and similarities are discussed for those who define themselves as LGBTQ, as well as examined in cultural and global contexts. While the course content grounds students in a historical understanding of how far psychology has come, it also provides opportunity for debate and discussion on contemporary issues and psychology's contemporary contributions to understanding sexual orientation.
PR Ciano-Boyce, C MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM WILSN 109 3.0
PSYC 0215-001 (20686) ADAPT. AND ANIM BEHAV.
PSYC 0215 ADAPTATION AND ANIMAL BEHAVIOR (3)
Introduces the student to the evolutionary analysis of behavior and the concept of adaptive behavior. We will apply evolutionary theory to explain the behavior of animals in a number of contexts, including sexual behavior, social behavior, foraging behavior, and predator-prey interactions. The course will focus on examining the behavior of non-human animals, particularly mammals, birds, insects and fish, although some reference to our own species will also be made.
PR Bressler, E MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM WILSN 109 3.0
PSYC 0215-002 (20687) ADAPT. AND ANIM BEHAV.
PSYC 0215 ADAPTATION AND ANIMAL BEHAVIOR (3)
Introduces the student to the evolutionary analysis of behavior and the concept of adaptive behavior. We will apply evolutionary theory to explain the behavior of animals in a number of contexts, including sexual behavior, social behavior, foraging behavior, and predator-prey interactions. The course will focus on examining the behavior of non-human animals, particularly mammals, birds, insects and fish, although some reference to our own species will also be made.
PR Bressler, E MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM WILSN 109 3.0
PSYC 0219-001 (21213) RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYC I
PSYC 0219 RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY I (3)
This content-based course will provide students with theoretical knowledge about scientific methods of research in psychology, focusing on evaluating the validity of claims using evidence, measurement, the strengths and weaknesses of different research designs, and the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data.� In addition, this course will introduce students to the use of references in scientific writing and American psychological Association (APA) style citations.
PR Camilleri, J MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM WILSN 116 3.0
PSYC 0219-002 (21214) RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYC I
PSYC 0219 RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY I (3)
This content-based course will provide students with theoretical knowledge about scientific methods of research in psychology, focusing on evaluating the validity of claims using evidence, measurement, the strengths and weaknesses of different research designs, and the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data.� In addition, this course will introduce students to the use of references in scientific writing and American psychological Association (APA) style citations.
PR Camilleri, J TR 08:15 AM-09:30 AM WILSN 116 3.0
PSYC 0303-001 (20159) ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY
PSYC 0303 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)
The etiology, development, and therapy of mental disorders. Stress will be on the psychodynamics of pathological behavior. Consideration will be given to various forms of unusual behavior ranging from anxiety states to psychosis. Analyses of pathological behavior will be based on current theories of maturation, emotion, and personality.
PR Morrison, N TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM WILSN 116A 3.0
PSYC 0303-002 (20166) ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY
PSYC 0303 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)
The etiology, development, and therapy of mental disorders. Stress will be on the psychodynamics of pathological behavior. Consideration will be given to various forms of unusual behavior ranging from anxiety states to psychosis. Analyses of pathological behavior will be based on current theories of maturation, emotion, and personality.
PR Morrison, N TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM WILSN 116A 3.0
PSYC 0305-001 (20173) FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY
PSYC 0305 FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY (3)
This course is designed to introduce students to the field of forensic psychology by covering basic research and theory on the causes of criminal behavior, reviewing clinical assessment and treatment of criminals, and describing psychological applications in courts, policing, and corrections. By the end of the course, students will be able to conceptualize and categorize various types of crime, understand the many theoretical frameworks used to explain criminal behavior, use theories to generate research ideas on criminality, critically appraise procedures that are used to assess and treat offenders, understand attributes of special criminal populations, and describe how humans have responded to crime.
PR Camilleri, J TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM WILSN 116 3.0
PSYC 0305-002 (20807) FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY
PSYC 0305 FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY (3)
This course is designed to introduce students to the field of forensic psychology by covering basic research and theory on the causes of criminal behavior, reviewing clinical assessment and treatment of criminals, and describing psychological applications in courts, policing, and corrections. By the end of the course, students will be able to conceptualize and categorize various types of crime, understand the many theoretical frameworks used to explain criminal behavior, use theories to generate research ideas on criminality, critically appraise procedures that are used to assess and treat offenders, understand attributes of special criminal populations, and describe how humans have responded to crime.
PR Camilleri, J TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 116 3.0
PSYC 0306-001 (21204) LEARNING
PSYC 0306 LEARNING (3)
An introduction to the terminology, concepts, and methods in the study of learning. An examination of principles in terms of early and contemporary inquiries and experiments. The focus is on classical and instrumental conditioning, generalization, and discrimination processes.
PR Andrade, L MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM WILSN 116A 3.0
PSYC 0306-002 (21207) LEARNING
PSYC 0306 LEARNING (3)
An introduction to the terminology, concepts, and methods in the study of learning. An examination of principles in terms of early and contemporary inquiries and experiments. The focus is on classical and instrumental conditioning, generalization, and discrimination processes.
PR Reyes, J MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM WILSN 112 3.0
PSYC 0308-002 (21215) STATS FOR PSYCHOLOGISTS
PSYC 0308 STATISTICS FOR PSYCHOLOGISTS (3)
The application of statistical methods to current research problems in psychology. The selection of procedures appropriate to problems, performance of the procedures, interpretation of outcomes, data tabulation and reduction, measures of central tendency and variability, correlation and prediction, tests of significance, t-test, chi square and analyses of variance.
PR Daniel, T ONLINE 3.0
PSYC 0308-003 (20175) STATS FOR PSYCHOLOGISTS
PSYC 0308 STATISTICS FOR PSYCHOLOGISTS (3)
The application of statistical methods to current research problems in psychology. The selection of procedures appropriate to problems, performance of the procedures, interpretation of outcomes, data tabulation and reduction, measures of central tendency and variability, correlation and prediction, tests of significance, t-test, chi square and analyses of variance.
PR Daniel, T TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM WILSN 130 3.0
PSYC 0311-002 (20054) HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
PSYC 0311 HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY (3)
This course will introduce the student to the psychological specialty area of health psychology, a field of psychology targeting the improvement and maintenance of physical health, as well as the prevention of health difficulties. The student will understand the associative, multidirectional links between physiological systems, cognition, behavior, and social environment. Attention is given to applied psychological techniques for health improvement, maintenance, and prevention. Theoretical models of health behavior are used to initiate health behavior change.
PR Williams, S MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM WILSN 116 3.0
PSYC 0311-011 (20471) HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
PSYC 0311 HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY (3)
This course will introduce the student to the psychological specialty area of health psychology, a field of psychology targeting the improvement and maintenance of physical health, as well as the prevention of health difficulties. The student will understand the associative, multidirectional links between physiological systems, cognition, behavior, and social environment. Attention is given to applied psychological techniques for health improvement, maintenance, and prevention. Theoretical models of health behavior are used to initiate health behavior change.
PR Williams, S MWF 12:35 PM-01:25 PM WILSN 116 3.0
PSYC 0312-001 (20476) BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
PSYC 0312 BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE (3)
A broad introduction to the field of behavioral neuroscience will be provided by utilizing examples reflective of the interdisciplinary nature of the field. The course will cover a content related to foundation topics such as cells of the nervous system, neuroanatomy, basic neurophysiology, neurotransmitters and general actions drugs. Building on this foundation, subsequent course topics will include neural development, sensory systems, sleep AND wakefulness, hunger, emotions and learning AND memory.
PR Mennella, P TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM WILSN 420 3.0
PSYC 0314-PC1 (21216) CE: HISTORY AND SYSTEMS
PSYC 0314 CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE: HISTORY AND SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY (3)
This course explores the theoretical and methodological principles of contemporary psychology and provides historical perspective for their origins. History and Systems of Psychology provides a broad overview of the development of psychology as an independent discipline and of the various sub-specialties in the field. It evaluates the significance of new movements and methods by examining intellectual antecedents and underlying assumptions of psychology.
PR Daniel, T MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM WILSN 109 3.0
PSYC 0317-001 (21208) APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS
PSYC 0317 APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS (3)
An overview of the basic techniques derived from operant and respondent conditioning used to bring about behavioral change. Topics include the several categories of reinforcement, schedules, shaping, generalization, stimulus discrimination, and punishment as well as methods of data collection.
PR Reyes, J TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM WILSN 116 3.0
PSYC 0318-001 (21217) PSYCH-INTERPERSONAL REL AND COMM
PSYC 0318 PSYCHOLOGY OF INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS (3)
The major focus is on the nature of interpersonal relationships and how communication influences the formation, destruction and improvement of our relationships. We will bring together the thinking of major theorists and research findings in many areas dealing with interpersonal relations and communications.
PR Burwell, R MWF 12:35 PM-01:25 PM WILSN 109 3.0
PSYC 0319-001 (20053) RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYC II
PSYC 0319 RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY II (3)
This writing-intensive course will provide students with practical experience conducting research.�Students will review the psychological literature, develop appropriate research design(s), collect data while practicing ethical research, and analyze and interpret their own data.�Students will also receive in-depth instruction and practice in the communication of research results.
PR Mennella, P TR 08:15 AM-09:30 AM WILSN 109 3.0
PSYC 0319-002 (20057) RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYC II
PSYC 0319 RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY II (3)
This writing-intensive course will provide students with practical experience conducting research.�Students will review the psychological literature, develop appropriate research design(s), collect data while practicing ethical research, and analyze and interpret their own data.�Students will also receive in-depth instruction and practice in the communication of research results.
PR Mennella, P TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM WILSN 109 3.0
PSYC 0322-001 (20690) THEORIES OF COUNSELING
PSYC 0322 THEORIES OF COUNSELING (3)
A presentation of the philosophies, methods, techniques, and research associated with five or six major contemporary counseling theories such as psychoanalytic, client-centered, rational emotive, and gestalt.
PR Burwell, R MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM WILSN 112 3.0
PSYC 0322-002 (21218) THEORIES OF COUNSELING
PSYC 0322 THEORIES OF COUNSELING (3)
A presentation of the philosophies, methods, techniques, and research associated with five or six major contemporary counseling theories such as psychoanalytic, client-centered, rational emotive, and gestalt.
PR Burwell, R MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM WILSN 112 3.0
PSYC 0333-001 (20540) PRACTICUM IN PSYCHOLOGY
PSYC 0333 PRACTICUM IN PSYCHOLOGY (6)
Students participate in placements in agencies which provide various psychological services to the community.� They also attend weekly seminar classes.� The primary goal of the placement is to provide an opportunity for the student to become involved in a meaningful manner with the services provided by the agency.� It is hoped that the student can make a contribution to the service.� The student is responsible, under the joint direction of an agency representative and a Department of Psychology supervisor, for the formulation of a detailed outline of activities, time commitment, and responsibilities.� The student will also prepare a term paper and a final evaluation related to the activities in which he/she is involved.� The agency is expected to provide general supervision and make a final evaluation of the student's performance.� The Department representative will make periodic evaluations of the student's performance and will cooperate fully with the agency supervisor.� Students must have a psychology major GPA greater than or equal to 2.5, be at least a second semester junior, and have greater than 23 completed psychology credits.
PR Deni, A T 02:15 PM-04:45 PM WILSN 109 6.0
PSYC 0336-001 (20174) PSYCH OF THE FAMILY
PSYC 0336 PSYCHOLOGY OF THE FAMILY (3)
A presentation of theories of how family interaction and patterns of response influence personality and behavior. An exploration of the characteristics of �healthy� and �unhealthy� families and the types of individuals they produce. A review of family therapy techniques as a means of treating the �identified patient.� Limited to juniors and seniors.
PR Deni, A R 02:15 PM-04:45 PM WILSN 109 3.0
PSYC 0341-001 (20051) COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY
PSYC 0341 COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY (3)
The psychology of sensation, perception, psycholinguistics, cognition and information processing. Topics include memory, attention, pattern recognition, thinking, problem solving, language, and artificial intelligence. Lectures stress in-depth reviews of the experimental evidence which bears on theories of cognition and language.
PR Daniel, T MWF 08:15 AM-09:05 AM WILSN 109 3.0
PSYC 0351-PC2 (21211) CE: EMOTION
PSYC 0351 EMOTION (3)
An exploration of theories and research in the study of emotion. Topics to be covered include historical and cultural influences on the understanding of emotion, current theoretical explanations of emotion, research on the elements of emotion, issues of development, and other topics such as emotional regulation, emotional intelligence and the role of emotion in cognition, personality and disorder. This is a seminar style course. It fulfills the capstone requirement for the psychology major.
PR Gebelt, J TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM WILSN 116A 3.0
PSYC 0363-001 (20692) CROSS CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY
PSYC 0363 CROSS CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)
This course will focus on understanding different cultural values, norms and beliefs - an ingredient for effective communication among people of differing cultures. Topics to be covered are the differences in cognitive processes that lead to misunderstanding and conflicts between members of different groups, e.g. differences in perception, thinking, verbal and nonverbal behavior. The goal of the course is for students to understand and become more comfortable with the ideas and behavior of others whose culture is different from their own.
PR Zhang, H MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM WILSN 116 3.0
Soci. Hisp. and Inter. Studies
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
HNRS 0101-H01 (21222) HONORS DISCOVERY SEMINAR
HNRS 0101 HONORS DISCOVERY SEMINAR (1)
A (1 credit) first-year seminar to foster the successful transition of new Honors Program students into their college lives, with the support of current Honors Program peer mentors (enrolled in the course for 1-3 credits) to help them understand university resources, expectations, and policies; identify faculty, staff, and student groups whose interests align with their goals; and provide opportunities for social engagement on campus outside of class time. Through experiential learning, with an emphasis on maximizing the use of campus resources and enhancing self-awareness through deep reflection, this course will actively engage students in their Westfield State University experience, while fostering personal and professional growth in a dynamic and inclusive classroom environment. This seminar is an elective, not required for Honors Program completion. Can be taken multiple times for credit; maximum 6 credits applicable to Honors Program requirements.
Giuliano, F M 09:20 AM-10:10 AM MOD 1.0
HNRS 0101-H02 (21226) HONORS DISCOVERY SEMINAR
HNRS 0101 HONORS DISCOVERY SEMINAR (1)
A (1 credit) first-year seminar to foster the successful transition of new Honors Program students into their college lives, with the support of current Honors Program peer mentors (enrolled in the course for 1-3 credits) to help them understand university resources, expectations, and policies; identify faculty, staff, and student groups whose interests align with their goals; and provide opportunities for social engagement on campus outside of class time. Through experiential learning, with an emphasis on maximizing the use of campus resources and enhancing self-awareness through deep reflection, this course will actively engage students in their Westfield State University experience, while fostering personal and professional growth in a dynamic and inclusive classroom environment. This seminar is an elective, not required for Honors Program completion. Can be taken multiple times for credit; maximum 6 credits applicable to Honors Program requirements.
Weng, M M 10:25 AM-11:15 AM WILSN 304 1.0
HNRS 0101-H03 (21227) HONORS DISCOVERY SEMINAR
HNRS 0101 HONORS DISCOVERY SEMINAR (1)
A (1 credit) first-year seminar to foster the successful transition of new Honors Program students into their college lives, with the support of current Honors Program peer mentors (enrolled in the course for 1-3 credits) to help them understand university resources, expectations, and policies; identify faculty, staff, and student groups whose interests align with their goals; and provide opportunities for social engagement on campus outside of class time. Through experiential learning, with an emphasis on maximizing the use of campus resources and enhancing self-awareness through deep reflection, this course will actively engage students in their Westfield State University experience, while fostering personal and professional growth in a dynamic and inclusive classroom environment. This seminar is an elective, not required for Honors Program completion. Can be taken multiple times for credit; maximum 6 credits applicable to Honors Program requirements.
Weng, M M 11:30 AM-12:20 PM MOD 1.0
HNRS 0101-H04 (21223) HONORS DISCOVERY SEMINAR
HNRS 0101 HONORS DISCOVERY SEMINAR (1)
A (1 credit) first-year seminar to foster the successful transition of new Honors Program students into their college lives, with the support of current Honors Program peer mentors (enrolled in the course for 1-3 credits) to help them understand university resources, expectations, and policies; identify faculty, staff, and student groups whose interests align with their goals; and provide opportunities for social engagement on campus outside of class time. Through experiential learning, with an emphasis on maximizing the use of campus resources and enhancing self-awareness through deep reflection, this course will actively engage students in their Westfield State University experience, while fostering personal and professional growth in a dynamic and inclusive classroom environment. This seminar is an elective, not required for Honors Program completion. Can be taken multiple times for credit; maximum 6 credits applicable to Honors Program requirements.
Giuliano, F M 12:35 PM-01:25 PM MOD 1.0
HNRS 0301-H02 (21122) HNRS: AFRICAN WARLORDS AND CHILD
HNRS 0301 UPPER-LEVEL INTERDISCIPLINARY HONORS SEMINAR (3)
A special topics seminar that constitutes an innovative new course, substantially different from any existing WSU course;�is interdisciplinary and appropriate for students across majors; features speakers, trips, and/or other special events to enhance classroom learning; and includes a capstone project that could lead to conference participation or provide a basis for Senior Honors Project work. Students must take one upper-level interdisciplinary Honors seminar to complete Honors Program requirements. Variable topics; may be taken more than once.
PR Banwo, A TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM BATES 123 3.0
HNRS 0301-H03 (21148) HNRS: THE WIRE
HNRS 0301 UPPER-LEVEL INTERDISCIPLINARY HONORS SEMINAR (3)
A special topics seminar that constitutes an innovative new course, substantially different from any existing WSU course;�is interdisciplinary and appropriate for students across majors; features speakers, trips, and/or other special events to enhance classroom learning; and includes a capstone project that could lead to conference participation or provide a basis for Senior Honors Project work. Students must take one upper-level interdisciplinary Honors seminar to complete Honors Program requirements. Variable topics; may be taken more than once.
PR Schlaffer, J TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WILSN 402 3.0
HNRS 0390-H01 (21224) HONORS PROGRAM MENTORSHIP
HNRS 0390 HONORS PROGRAM INTERNSHIP (1-3)
A variable credit internship that allows students to develop and carry out independent special projexts related to the Honors Program. Examples might include producing content, layout, and design for the Honors Program newsletter; developing and carrying out special projects related to Honors Program events, student mentoring, or academic support; managing social media marketing and analytics, and other projects. Supervised by the Honors Program Director, Assistant Director, or Faculty Fellow. Students will be required to keep a log of their activities during the internship and to compile a portfolio of work completed at its conclusion. 3 credits = 8 hours per week. This internship does not fulfill a student's own department internship, unless with permission of the student's department chair.
Giuliano, F M 09:20 AM-10:10 AM MOD 1.0
HNRS 0390-H02 (21228) HONORS PROGRAM MENTORSHIP
HNRS 0390 HONORS PROGRAM INTERNSHIP (1-3)
A variable credit internship that allows students to develop and carry out independent special projexts related to the Honors Program. Examples might include producing content, layout, and design for the Honors Program newsletter; developing and carrying out special projects related to Honors Program events, student mentoring, or academic support; managing social media marketing and analytics, and other projects. Supervised by the Honors Program Director, Assistant Director, or Faculty Fellow. Students will be required to keep a log of their activities during the internship and to compile a portfolio of work completed at its conclusion. 3 credits = 8 hours per week. This internship does not fulfill a student's own department internship, unless with permission of the student's department chair.
Weng, M M 10:25 AM-11:15 AM MOD 1.0
HNRS 0390-H03 (21229) HONORS PROGRAM MENTORSHIP
HNRS 0390 HONORS PROGRAM INTERNSHIP (1-3)
A variable credit internship that allows students to develop and carry out independent special projexts related to the Honors Program. Examples might include producing content, layout, and design for the Honors Program newsletter; developing and carrying out special projects related to Honors Program events, student mentoring, or academic support; managing social media marketing and analytics, and other projects. Supervised by the Honors Program Director, Assistant Director, or Faculty Fellow. Students will be required to keep a log of their activities during the internship and to compile a portfolio of work completed at its conclusion. 3 credits = 8 hours per week. This internship does not fulfill a student's own department internship, unless with permission of the student's department chair.
Weng, M M 11:30 AM-12:20 PM MOD 1.0
HNRS 0390-H04 (21225) HONORS PROGRAM MENTORSHIP
HNRS 0390 HONORS PROGRAM INTERNSHIP (1-3)
A variable credit internship that allows students to develop and carry out independent special projexts related to the Honors Program. Examples might include producing content, layout, and design for the Honors Program newsletter; developing and carrying out special projects related to Honors Program events, student mentoring, or academic support; managing social media marketing and analytics, and other projects. Supervised by the Honors Program Director, Assistant Director, or Faculty Fellow. Students will be required to keep a log of their activities during the internship and to compile a portfolio of work completed at its conclusion. 3 credits = 8 hours per week. This internship does not fulfill a student's own department internship, unless with permission of the student's department chair.
Giuliano, F M 12:35 PM-01:25 PM MOD 1.0
HNRS 0390-H05 (21230) HNRS PRGRM NWSLTTR INTRNSHP
HNRS 0390 HONORS PROGRAM INTERNSHIP (1-3)
A variable credit internship that allows students to develop and carry out independent special projexts related to the Honors Program. Examples might include producing content, layout, and design for the Honors Program newsletter; developing and carrying out special projects related to Honors Program events, student mentoring, or academic support; managing social media marketing and analytics, and other projects. Supervised by the Honors Program Director, Assistant Director, or Faculty Fellow. Students will be required to keep a log of their activities during the internship and to compile a portfolio of work completed at its conclusion. 3 credits = 8 hours per week. This internship does not fulfill a student's own department internship, unless with permission of the student's department chair.
Sackett-Taylor, H 1.0
HNRS 0390-H06 (21231) HNRS PRGRM SCL MEDIA INTRNSHP
HNRS 0390 HONORS PROGRAM INTERNSHIP (1-3)
A variable credit internship that allows students to develop and carry out independent special projexts related to the Honors Program. Examples might include producing content, layout, and design for the Honors Program newsletter; developing and carrying out special projects related to Honors Program events, student mentoring, or academic support; managing social media marketing and analytics, and other projects. Supervised by the Honors Program Director, Assistant Director, or Faculty Fellow. Students will be required to keep a log of their activities during the internship and to compile a portfolio of work completed at its conclusion. 3 credits = 8 hours per week. This internship does not fulfill a student's own department internship, unless with permission of the student's department chair.
Sackett-Taylor, H 3.0
HNRS 0390-H07 (21542) HNRS: IS: SOCIAL MEDIA INTERN
HNRS 0390 HONORS PROGRAM INTERNSHIP (1-3)
A variable credit internship that allows students to develop and carry out independent special projexts related to the Honors Program. Examples might include producing content, layout, and design for the Honors Program newsletter; developing and carrying out special projects related to Honors Program events, student mentoring, or academic support; managing social media marketing and analytics, and other projects. Supervised by the Honors Program Director, Assistant Director, or Faculty Fellow. Students will be required to keep a log of their activities during the internship and to compile a portfolio of work completed at its conclusion. 3 credits = 8 hours per week. This internship does not fulfill a student's own department internship, unless with permission of the student's department chair.
Sackett-Taylor, H
HNRS 0390-H08 (21546) HNRS: IS: SQRRL SQRE INTERN
HNRS 0390 HONORS PROGRAM INTERNSHIP (1-3)
A variable credit internship that allows students to develop and carry out independent special projexts related to the Honors Program. Examples might include producing content, layout, and design for the Honors Program newsletter; developing and carrying out special projects related to Honors Program events, student mentoring, or academic support; managing social media marketing and analytics, and other projects. Supervised by the Honors Program Director, Assistant Director, or Faculty Fellow. Students will be required to keep a log of their activities during the internship and to compile a portfolio of work completed at its conclusion. 3 credits = 8 hours per week. This internship does not fulfill a student's own department internship, unless with permission of the student's department chair.
Sackett-Taylor, H
LANG 0210-001 (20002) LANGUAGE, CULTURE AND SOCIETY
LANG 0210 LANGUAGE CULTURE AND SOCIETY (3)
An introduction to the role of language in shaping and reflecting social structures within and among human communities. Topics treated include language issues in relation to social class, ethnicity and gender, language usage and language change, and controversies centering on issues of language and public policy primarily in the U.S.
Oulbeid, B ONLINE 3.0 UDIV/SOCU
LASL 0101-001 (20001) AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I
LASL 0101 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I (3)
Assist those new to American Sign Language develop linguistic skills to communicate effectively with Deaf or hard of hearing customers/co-workers in various workplaces.� Students will also learn about American Deaf Culture, accommodation materials for Deaf and hard of hearing people, requesting appropriate people to facilitate between hearing people and def/hard of hearing people, and the use of alternative approaches to communicate with Deaf and hard of hearing people.
Caliendo, G TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM REMSYC 3.0
LASL 0101-002 (20435) AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I
LASL 0101 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I (3)
Assist those new to American Sign Language develop linguistic skills to communicate effectively with Deaf or hard of hearing customers/co-workers in various workplaces.� Students will also learn about American Deaf Culture, accommodation materials for Deaf and hard of hearing people, requesting appropriate people to facilitate between hearing people and def/hard of hearing people, and the use of alternative approaches to communicate with Deaf and hard of hearing people.
Caliendo, G TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM REMSYC 3.0
LASL 0102-001 (21016) AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II
LASL 0102 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II (3)
A continuation of LASL 0101.� The students will focus on manual grammar and non-facial markers, and continue to develop American Sign Language skills to communicate effectively with Deaf or hard of hearing customers/co-workers in various workplaces.� Students will also continue to learn about Deaf culture, accommodation material for Deaf and hard of hearing people, requesting appropriate people to facilitate between hearing and Deaf/hard of hearing people, and the use of alternative approaches to communicate with Deaf and hard of hearing people.
PR Rogers, J TR 03:45 PM-05:00 PM REMSYC 3.0
LCUL 0201-001 (21014) WOMEN IN THE HISPANIC WORLD
LCUL 0201 WOMEN IN THE HISPANIC WORLD (3)
A study of selected female figures of historic, artistic, political, or cultural importance within the Hispanic world, as well as social movements shaped by women�s distinctive roles and contributions. Readings of primary and secondary sources, oral presentations and significant writing required.
PR Beaubien, C MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM MOD 110 3.0 GDIV
LFRE 0101-001 (20006) FRENCH 1
LFRE 0101 FRENCH I (3)
The first course in the French language sequence. An introduction to the sounds and basic grammatical structures of standard conversational French. Stress on oral comprehension and speaking as well as the reading and writing of simple grammatical patterns. Vocabulary is limited to about 400-500 of the most used words.
Oulbeid, B TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM BATES 04 3.0
LLIT 0232-001 (20559) PUERTO RICAN LITERATURES
LLIT 0232 PUERTO RICAN LITERATURES (3)
Focus on the intersections of race, class, gender and sexual beliefs and practices in the processes of colonialism in Puerto Rican.� We will examine how colonialism used constructions of sexuality to create political, cultural, and social dynamics that have pervaded the lives of the colonized, and influences the sensitivities, beliefs, and perspectives of Western cultures and practices in general.� These goals will be accomplished through a close reading of Puerto Rican writers on the island, that reflect those political, cultural, and social changes that it has undergone since it was ceded to the United States as a direct result of the Spanish-American War (1898). �
Viera, H ONLINE 3.0 UDIV/LPA
LLIT 0310-001 (20003) MYTH AND NATION: SPAN CIVIL WAR
LLIT 0310 SEMINAR IN HISPANIC STUDIES (3)
A study of selected issues, thinkers, themes, authors or genres drawn from the literary and artistic traditions from Latin America, Spaini and U.S. Latinos/as. Readings of primary and secondary sources, oral presentations and significant writing required. Topic varies by semester. Taught in English.
PR Beaubien, C ONLINE 3.0 LPA/GDIV
LSPA 0101-001 (20465) SPANISH I
LSPA 0101 SPANISH I (3)
The first course in Spanish for those who have never studied the language before. Through an introduction to both sounds and basic grammatical structures, it will provide the student with a foundation in both spoken and written Spanish. In this course the emphasis will be on oral comprehension and speaking, and acquisition of a limited, basic vocabulary.
Beaubien, C MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM MOD 110 3.0
LSPA 0103-001 (20004) SPANISH III
LSPA 0103 SPANISH III (3)
The third course in the Spanish sequence will review and seek to expand students' understanding of grammatical structures. Increased emphasis on reading and writing through materials dealing with aspects of the Spanish-speaking world.
Beaubien, C MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM MOD 110 3.0 GDIV
LSPA 0215-001 (20005) SPEAKING AND WRITING SPANISH
LSPA 0215 SPEAKING AND WRITING SPANISH (3)
This course seeks to help students develop further their proficiency in oral and written communicative skills through a study of cultural aspects of the contemporary Hispanic world. The course is conducted entirely in Spanish. The language acquisition component focuses on the expansion of vocabulary, the practice of intermediate-level grammatical structures, and the performance of intermediate-level level communicative tasks. The area studies component concentrates on contemporary events and personalities in the Hispanic world.
PR Viera, H TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM MOD 110 3.0 GDIV
LSPA 0314-001 (21015) SPANISH FOR THE PROFESSIONS
LSPA 0314 SPANISH FOR THE PROFESSIONS (3)
Emphasis on oral and written communication with a focus on improving language skills in specific professional settings.� In addition, this course seeks to enhance students' oral and written proficiency while increasing student awareness of Hispanic/Latino/Latin American communities in the U.S.
PR Viera, H TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM MOD 110 3.0
SOCI 0101-001 (21123) PRIN OF SOCIOLOGY
SOCI 0101 PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY (3)
An introduction to the fundamental concepts of group behavior, major social institutions, principal theoretical perspectives and the nature of sociological research. Topics to be covered include, but are not limited to: the development of the discipline of sociology, components of culture, socialization, research methods, deviance, stratification and social change.
Loeb, K TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM MOD 105 3.0 SOCU
SOCI 0101-002 (21124) PRIN OF SOCIOLOGY
SOCI 0101 PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY (3)
An introduction to the fundamental concepts of group behavior, major social institutions, principal theoretical perspectives and the nature of sociological research. Topics to be covered include, but are not limited to: the development of the discipline of sociology, components of culture, socialization, research methods, deviance, stratification and social change.
Loeb, K TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM MOD 105 3.0 SOCU
SOCI 0101-003 (20020) PRIN OF SOCIOLOGY
SOCI 0101 PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY (3)
An introduction to the fundamental concepts of group behavior, major social institutions, principal theoretical perspectives and the nature of sociological research. Topics to be covered include, but are not limited to: the development of the discipline of sociology, components of culture, socialization, research methods, deviance, stratification and social change.
Dong, T MWF 10:25 AM-11:15 AM MOD 105 3.0 SOCU
SOCI 0101-004 (21126) PRIN OF SOCIOLOGY
SOCI 0101 PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY (3)
An introduction to the fundamental concepts of group behavior, major social institutions, principal theoretical perspectives and the nature of sociological research. Topics to be covered include, but are not limited to: the development of the discipline of sociology, components of culture, socialization, research methods, deviance, stratification and social change.
Carter, B MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM MOD 105 3.0 SOCU
SOCI 0101-007 (20018) PRIN OF SOCIOLOGY
SOCI 0101 PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY (3)
An introduction to the fundamental concepts of group behavior, major social institutions, principal theoretical perspectives and the nature of sociological research. Topics to be covered include, but are not limited to: the development of the discipline of sociology, components of culture, socialization, research methods, deviance, stratification and social change.
STAFF ONLINE 3.0 SOCU
SOCI 0101-H01 (20027) HNRS: PRIN OF SOCIOLOGY
SOCI 0101 PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY (3)
An introduction to the fundamental concepts of group behavior, major social institutions, principal theoretical perspectives and the nature of sociological research. Topics to be covered include, but are not limited to: the development of the discipline of sociology, components of culture, socialization, research methods, deviance, stratification and social change.
Dong, T MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM MOD 105 3.0 SOCU
SOCI 0202-001 (21325) RACE AND ETHNIC RELAT
SOCI 0202 RACE AND ETHNIC RELATIONS (3)
A study of the phenomena which arise when different biological and cultural groups interact, and of theories and methods calculated to reduce antipathy and discrimination against minority groups, with an emphasis on American relations.
PR STAFF MWF 12:35 PM-01:25 PM MOD 105 3.0 UDIV
SOCI 0309-001 (21125) SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION
SOCI 0309 SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION (3)
The scientific study of religion dating from mid-19th century animists and naturalists. Religion as a basic social institution with both integrative and diverse tendencies. Organizational patterns; interrelationships with other institutions. Theoretical developments within the field. Changing emphases in the function of religion as a major source of meaning and values in human societies.
PR Loeb, K ONLINE 3.0
SOCI 0314-001 (21129) COLLECTIVE BEH AND SOCIAL MVMTS
SOCI 0314 COLLECTIVE BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS (3)
Study of crowds, panics and riots, fads and fashions, rumor and propaganda, the formation of publics and social movements. Examines the transition from unorganized to organized group behavior whose intent is to enact or impede social change. Such group behaviors are examined through the prism of various sociological perspectives.
PR Mangaliso, N ONLINE 3.0
SOCI 0335-001 (20032) SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY
SOCI 0335 SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY (3)
In this course students are introduced in some depth to the various sociological theoretical perspectives as well as their �founders�. These perspectives have been used by social analysts and sociologists since the 19th century to the present in their analysis and understanding of society and human behavior. More specifically, students focus on the ideas and themes about society and eminent social analysts like Auguste Comte, Herbert Spencer, Karl Marx, George Simmel, Talcott Parsons and others. Of importance is for the students to begin gaining an understanding of how the ideas of these social analysts are of relevance to modern society as well as their own experiences.
PR Mangaliso, N TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM MOD 105 3.0
SOCI 0337-001 (21131) DEATH AND DYING
SOCI 0337 DEATH AND DYING (3)
A general understanding of applied sociological concepts of and perspectives on death and dying as related to society and communities in U.S. society.� We will critically engage 'Dead and the Sociological Imagination' as we explore the socio-historical meaning of death over the past couple of centuries and how death itself has become a booming industry in the United States.� This course will explore the many dimensions of the social space of death and dying.� We will make broad use of history, social psychology, and cultural studies as they intersect with the field of sociology in order to better understand the many complexities of death and dying in our social landscape today.� By the end of this course you should be thinking crucially about death and dying, including the way political, social, religious, and cultural history has shaped death.
PR Zayac, L ONLINE 3.0
Social Work
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
SOCW 0103-001 (20193) INTRO TO SOCIAL WORK
SOCW 0103 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK AND SOCIAL WELFARE (3)
Pre-professional course designed to introduce the student to the present profession of social work, present social welfare programs, and the history of social work and social welfare.
STAFF MW 03:10 PM-04:25 PM
Hybrid
MOD 106 3.0
SOCW 0103-002 (20194) INTRO TO SOCIAL WORK
SOCW 0103 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK AND SOCIAL WELFARE (3)
Pre-professional course designed to introduce the student to the present profession of social work, present social welfare programs, and the history of social work and social welfare.
Propp, J ONLINE 3.0
SOCW 0103-003 (20207) INTRO TO SOCIAL WORK
SOCW 0103 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK AND SOCIAL WELFARE (3)
Pre-professional course designed to introduce the student to the present profession of social work, present social welfare programs, and the history of social work and social welfare.
STAFF TR 03:45 PM-05:00 PM MOD 106 3.0
SOCW 0204-001 (20195) RESEARCH METHODS SOCIAL WORK
SOCW 0204 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS IN SOCIAL WORK (3)
Introduces social work students to the basics of social science research by examining the research process, purposes of research and the philosophy of research. Students will learn about the basics of measurement, sampling and causation. Students will review how the basic approaches to research, including qualitative research, experiments, surveys, and historical and comparative research, are applied and utilized by social workers. Research from social-work will be used to exemplify research principles.
PR STAFF W 09:00 AM-10:45 AM
Hybrid
MOD 106 3.0
SOCW 0204-002 (20196) RESEARCH METHODS SOCIAL WORK
SOCW 0204 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS IN SOCIAL WORK (3)
Introduces social work students to the basics of social science research by examining the research process, purposes of research and the philosophy of research. Students will learn about the basics of measurement, sampling and causation. Students will review how the basic approaches to research, including qualitative research, experiments, surveys, and historical and comparative research, are applied and utilized by social workers. Research from social-work will be used to exemplify research principles.
PR STAFF W 11:00 AM-12:45 PM
Hybrid
MOD 106 3.0
SOCW 0241-001 (20197) HUMAN BEH. AND SOCIAL ENVIRON. I
SOCW 0241 HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT I (3)
This is the first course of a two course sequence that will focus on how aspects of the social environment affect human behavior and on individual development across the life cycle.
PR Sullivan, R M 09:00 AM-10:45 AM
Hybrid
MOD 106 3.0
SOCW 0241-002 (20198) HUMAN BEH. AND SOCIAL ENVIRON. I
SOCW 0241 HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT I (3)
This is the first course of a two course sequence that will focus on how aspects of the social environment affect human behavior and on individual development across the life cycle.
PR Sullivan, R M 11:00 AM-12:45 PM
Hybrid
MOD 106 3.0
SOCW 0243-001 (20205) SOCIAL WELFARE POLICY ANALYSIS
SOCW 0243 SOCIAL WELFARE POLICY ANALYSIS (3)
Social science, historical, and ideological models, theories, and perspectives are used as a foundation to examine and analyze present social policies and social programs.
Propp, J T 12:40 PM-02:10 PM
Hybrid
MOD 106 3.0
SOCW 0243-002 (20206) SOCIAL WELFARE POLICY ANALYSIS
SOCW 0243 SOCIAL WELFARE POLICY ANALYSIS (3)
Social science, historical, and ideological models, theories, and perspectives are used as a foundation to examine and analyze present social policies and social programs.
Propp, J R 12:40 PM-02:10 PM
Hybrid
MOD 106 3.0
SOCW 0331-001 (21251) ST: SOC WORK PRAC W/TRAUMATIZE
SOCW 0331 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL WORK (3)
An in depth treatment of a limited and/or specialized area within social work.
Sullivan, R W 01:00 PM-02:45 PM
Hybrid
MOD 3.0
SOCW 0331-002 (21252) ST: CRISIS INTERVENTION
SOCW 0331 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL WORK (3)
An in depth treatment of a limited and/or specialized area within social work.
Dimock-Clark, M ONLINE 3.0
SOCW 0340-001 (20199) INTRO TO GENERALIST PRACTICE
SOCW 0340 INTRODUCTION TO GENERALIST PRACTICE (3)
Provides an introduction to the generalist practice process, the problem-solving model, critical thinking, the values and ethics of social work, recording methods, basic interviewing skills and how to apply this knowledge and these skills across various types of practice situations (with individuals, families, groups, communities, and organizations).
PR Dimock-Clark, M F 09:00 AM-11:45 AM MOD 106 3.0
SOCW 0340-002 (20200) INTRO TO GENERALIST PRACTICE
SOCW 0340 INTRODUCTION TO GENERALIST PRACTICE (3)
Provides an introduction to the generalist practice process, the problem-solving model, critical thinking, the values and ethics of social work, recording methods, basic interviewing skills and how to apply this knowledge and these skills across various types of practice situations (with individuals, families, groups, communities, and organizations).
PR STAFF F 12:15 PM-03:00 PM MOD 106 3.0
SOCW 0343-002 (20201) GENRLS PRAC: FAMILIES AND GROUPS
SOCW 0343 GENERALIST PRACTICE WITH FAMILIES AND GROUPS (3)
Introduces students to the knowledge and skills needed to plan and guide social work groups and the knowledge and skills to work with family systems.
PR STAFF TR 08:15 AM-09:30 AM MOD 106 3.0
SOCW 0343-003 (20470) GENRLS PRAC: FAMILIES AND GROUPS
SOCW 0343 GENERALIST PRACTICE WITH FAMILIES AND GROUPS (3)
Introduces students to the knowledge and skills needed to plan and guide social work groups and the knowledge and skills to work with family systems.
PR STAFF TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM MOD 106 3.0
SOCW 0351-001 (20202) SOCIAL WORK PRACTICUM I
SOCW 0351 SOCIAL WORK PRACTICUM I (7)
Social work majors in their senior year are required to complete a two-semester, 400 hour, hands on social work experience in an approved agency under the supervision of a professional social worker. Included is a weekly seminar that provides further integration of practice with the skills, knowledge, and values and ethics of the field.
PR STAFF T 11:15 AM-12:30 PM MOD 106 7.0
SOCW 0351-002 (20204) SOCIAL WORK PRACTICUM I
SOCW 0351 SOCIAL WORK PRACTICUM I (7)
Social work majors in their senior year are required to complete a two-semester, 400 hour, hands on social work experience in an approved agency under the supervision of a professional social worker. Included is a weekly seminar that provides further integration of practice with the skills, knowledge, and values and ethics of the field.
PR STAFF T 11:15 AM-12:30 PM MOD 7.0
SOCW 0353-001 (20203) SENIOR CAPSTONE I
SOCW 0353 SENIOR CAPSTONE I (2)
For Social Work Majors only. Social work majors propose, receive approval, and being to carry out a two-semester independent professional project that demonstrates integration of the six ares of the curriculum: 1) generalist social work practice, 2) diversity and social justice. 3) social welfare policy and planning, 4) human behavior and the social environment, 5) research, and 6) field education.
PR STAFF R 11:15 AM-12:30 PM
Hybrid
MOD 106 2.0
SOCW 0353-002 (20685) SENIOR CAPSTONE I
SOCW 0353 SENIOR CAPSTONE I (2)
For Social Work Majors only. Social work majors propose, receive approval, and being to carry out a two-semester independent professional project that demonstrates integration of the six ares of the curriculum: 1) generalist social work practice, 2) diversity and social justice. 3) social welfare policy and planning, 4) human behavior and the social environment, 5) research, and 6) field education.
PR STAFF R 11:15 AM-12:30 PM
Hybrid
MOD 2.0
Sports Medicine and Human Perf
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
MOVP 0100-001 (20562) SCIENCE OF PHY ACTVTY AND HEALTH
MOVP 0100 SCIENCE OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND HEALTH (3)
Through observation and experimentation students will examine the cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal and nervous systems of the body and the impact of exercise on their functioning. The effect of changing one's own personal exercise habits on risk factors for cardiovascular disease, longevity and quality of life will be explored.
STAFF ONLINE 3.0 ASCI
MOVP 0100-002 (20245) SCIENCE OF PHY ACTVTY AND HEALTH
MOVP 0100 SCIENCE OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND HEALTH (3)
Through observation and experimentation students will examine the cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal and nervous systems of the body and the impact of exercise on their functioning. The effect of changing one's own personal exercise habits on risk factors for cardiovascular disease, longevity and quality of life will be explored.
Selgrade, B TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM WDWRD 233 3.0 ASCI
MOVP 0100-003 (20563) SCIENCE OF PHY ACTVTY AND HEALTH
MOVP 0100 SCIENCE OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND HEALTH (3)
Through observation and experimentation students will examine the cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal and nervous systems of the body and the impact of exercise on their functioning. The effect of changing one's own personal exercise habits on risk factors for cardiovascular disease, longevity and quality of life will be explored.
Selgrade, B TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM WDWRD 233 3.0 ASCI
MOVP 0100-004 (20228) SCIENCE OF PHY ACTVTY AND HEALTH
MOVP 0100 SCIENCE OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND HEALTH (3)
Through observation and experimentation students will examine the cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal and nervous systems of the body and the impact of exercise on their functioning. The effect of changing one's own personal exercise habits on risk factors for cardiovascular disease, longevity and quality of life will be explored.
STAFF MWF 08:15 AM-09:05 AM WDWRD 236 3.0 ASCI
MOVP 0100-005 (20927) SCIENCE PHY ACTIVITY AND HEALT
MOVP 0100 SCIENCE OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND HEALTH (3)
Through observation and experimentation students will examine the cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal and nervous systems of the body and the impact of exercise on their functioning. The effect of changing one's own personal exercise habits on risk factors for cardiovascular disease, longevity and quality of life will be explored.
STAFF MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM WDWRD 236 3.0 ASCI
MOVP 0100-006 (20965) SCIENCE PHY ACTIVITY AND HEALT
MOVP 0100 SCIENCE OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND HEALTH (3)
Through observation and experimentation students will examine the cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal and nervous systems of the body and the impact of exercise on their functioning. The effect of changing one's own personal exercise habits on risk factors for cardiovascular disease, longevity and quality of life will be explored.
STAFF MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM WDWRD 236 3.0 ASCI
MOVP 0101-002 (20433) PROF ISSUES IN EXERCISE SCI
MOVP 0101 PROFESSIONAL ISSUES IN EXERCISE SCIENCE (3)
Exercise Science program course designed as an introduction to professional preparation in exercise science and to career choices in the sport, fitness and exercise sciences.� Students will gain an understanding of the scope of practice, educattional requirments and opportunitites involved in exercise related professions.� Students will be introduced to and will apply the concepts of: professionalism, professional communication (oral and written), self-reflection, information literacy, evidence based practice, professional ethics and personal resopnsibility.� Access to transportation is required for cmpletion of observation hours.
PR Noun, H T 12:45 PM-02:00 PM
Hybrid
WDWRD 240 3.0
MOVP 0103-001 (20778) INTRO TO TEACHING PE
MOVP 0103 INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING PHYSICAL EDUCATION (3)
In this course, teacher candidates will have initial exposure to school physical education programs via a pre-practicum experience, and reflect on those experiences during seminar. Candidates will have the opportunity to collaborate with physical education practitioners to plan and implement lessons, as well as to learn about and engage in reliable, ethical and responsible teaching routines that make knowledge accessible for all students. For seminar, candidates will read about, reflect upon, and discuss characteristics of quality physical education programming and instruction, as well as develop professional skills related to the field. Candidates will also examine the influences of foundational historical content and philosophical perspectives on today's physical education practices. Students are required to complete 30-hours of classroom observation. Prerequisite: Physical Education Concentration
PR Bohler, H F 01:40 PM-02:55 PM
Hybrid
WDWRD 240 3.0
MOVP 0107-001 (20235) EXERCISE INJ/PREV AND TREATMENT
MOVP 0107 EXERCISE INJURIES: PREVENTION AND TREATMENT (3)
Provides the student with the knowledge of the general principles of athletic training. The emphasis of the course will be the prevention and management of exercise/sport injuries and conditions.
Higgins, P TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WDWRD 236 3.0
MOVP 0132-01B (21151) Pilot: INTRO ATHL TRNG SKILL I
MOVP 0132 INTERMEDIATE SWIMMING (1)
Designed as an extension of basic swimming and safety skills; must be comfortable in deep water.
Higgins, P T 02:15 PM-03:30 PM
SECOND EIGHT WEEKS
WDWRD 239 .5
MOVP 0152-01A (21284) GOLF 1
MOVP 0152 GOLF I (1)
Designed to develop a basic understanding of the game of golf. The emphasis in this course will be on developing the proper stance, grip, and swing for the various clubs and shots in golf. Etiquette, scoring, individual play and team play are introduced.
STAFF TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM
FIRST EIGHT WEEKS
WDWRD 120 1.0
MOVP 0152-02A (21285) GOLF 1
MOVP 0152 GOLF I (1)
Designed to develop a basic understanding of the game of golf. The emphasis in this course will be on developing the proper stance, grip, and swing for the various clubs and shots in golf. Etiquette, scoring, individual play and team play are introduced.
STAFF TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM
FIRST EIGHT WEEKS
WDWRD 120 1.0
MOVP 0162-01A (20647) STRENGTH TRAIN AND CONDITION.
MOVP 0162 STRENGTH TRAINING AND CONDITIONING (1)
An introductory level course designed to familiarize students with the basic skills and principles of strength training and conditioning. The instruction in this course is geared toward fostering a commitment to lifelong participation in strength training physical activity in general.
Selgrade, B TR 03:45 PM-05:00 PM
FIRST EIGHT WEEKS
WDWRD 103 1.0
MOVP 0180-01A (20326) ROCK CLIMBING
MOVP 0180 ROCK CLIMBING (1)
Climbing ground, rocks, etc. where proper climbing technique is required. Will include climbing, belaying, knot tying, climbing calls, roped ascents, and repelling.
STAFF TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM
FIRST EIGHT WEEKS
WDWRD 120 1.0
MOVP 0182-001 (21286) LIFE GUARD TRAINING
MOVP 0182 LIFEGUARD TRAINING (2)
Designed to give students a complete course in preparation for Lifeguarding. It will give the students training in American Red Cross Standard First Aid, CPR for the Professional Rescuer, Automated External Defibrillation (AED), and Lifeguarding. It will also promote responsibility for protecting the safety of a patron in an assigned aquatic area. It is to instill a moral and professional obligation to prevent hazards and enforce rules regulations of an aquatic area.
STAFF TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM ELY POOL 2.0
MOVP 0183-01B (20645) RELAXATION TECHNIQUES
MOVP 0183 RELAXATION TECHNIQUES (1)
Provides students with practical application of relaxation theory. Students will learn relaxation techniques ranging from proper breathing to progressive relaxation methods to autogenics. The application of relaxation techniques as a method of stress management will also be addressed.
STAFF TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM
SECOND EIGHT WEEKS
WDWRD 230 1.0
MOVP 0183-02B (20646) RELAXATION TECHNIQUES
MOVP 0183 RELAXATION TECHNIQUES (1)
Provides students with practical application of relaxation theory. Students will learn relaxation techniques ranging from proper breathing to progressive relaxation methods to autogenics. The application of relaxation techniques as a method of stress management will also be addressed.
STAFF TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM
SECOND EIGHT WEEKS
WDWRD 230 1.0
MOVP 0190-01A (20648) FIRST AID AND EMERGENCY CARE
MOVP 0190 FIRST AID AND EMERGENCY CARE (1)
Provides the fundamental principles, knowledge and skills of first aid and accident prevention. Prepares the individual to care for most injuries and emergencies when medical assistance is delayed. First Aid and CPR certification will be available upon successful completion of the course.
STAFF TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM
FIRST EIGHT WEEKS
WDWRD 235 1.0
MOVP 0190-01B (20594) FIRST AID AND EMERGENCY CARE
MOVP 0190 FIRST AID AND EMERGENCY CARE (1)
Provides the fundamental principles, knowledge and skills of first aid and accident prevention. Prepares the individual to care for most injuries and emergencies when medical assistance is delayed. First Aid and CPR certification will be available upon successful completion of the course.
STAFF TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM
SECOND EIGHT WEEKS
WDWRD 235 1.0
MOVP 0191-001 (20438) ATHLETIC TRAINING SKILLS
MOVP 0191 ATHLETIC TRAINING SKILLS (1)
Athletic Training Education Program course with focus on skill development in the immediate care and prevention of athletic injuries and illness through structured laboratory exercises and clinical experiences. This course must be repeated once and may be repeated more than once, but no more than 2 credits may be applied to the major.
Lee Scecina, C W 10:25 AM-11:15 AM WDWRD 114 1.0
MOVP 0194-001 (20779) Musculoskeleta Stuct AND Functio
MOVP 0194 MUSCULOSKELETAL STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION (3)
The regional study of musculoskeletal function involved in human movement and exercise activities. This course will enable students to identify the structure and function of bones, joints and supporting ligaments. �Superficial muscles will be studied in terms of isometric, concentric and eccentric function and that knowledge will be applied to functional activities/strengthening.
STAFF MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM WDWRD 233 3.0
MOVP 0202-002 (20244) INTRO TO MOTOR LEARNING
MOVP 0202 INTRODUCTION TO MOTOR LEARNING (3)
The study of significant variables (e.g. performer, skill, and environment) that influence motor learning.� The focus will be on how those variables may be developed, strucgtured and/or modified to accomodate how students learn.
PR Rausch, R TR 08:15 AM-09:30 AM WDWRD 236 3.0
MOVP 0202-003 (20243) INTRO TO MOTOR LEARNING
MOVP 0202 INTRODUCTION TO MOTOR LEARNING (3)
The study of significant variables (e.g. performer, skill, and environment) that influence motor learning.� The focus will be on how those variables may be developed, strucgtured and/or modified to accomodate how students learn.
PR Rausch, R TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM WDWRD 236 3.0
MOVP 0203-002 (21150) MOTOR DEVELOP AND BEHAVIOR
MOVP 0203 MOTOR DEVELOPMENT AND BEHAVIOR (3)
This course is an evidences-based study of human motor development and behavior.� The knowledge and theories of child development are examined and applied to the analysis of motor development across the psycho-motor, cognitive and affective domains throughout the lifespan.� Topics include growth and maturation, stimulation and deprivation, physiological changes, sensation and perception, and locomotor and manipulative skill development.
PR Pantuosco Hensch, L MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM WDWRD 236 3.0
MOVP 0204-001 (20230) KINESIOLOGY
MOVP 0204 KINESIOLOGY (3)
Science of human motion, analysis of leverage in body movement and problems of readjustment in relationship to body mechanics and to physical activity as it is related to an understanding of skillful, efficient and purposeful human motion. A lab component is included.
PR Selgrade, B TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM WDWRD 233 3.0
MOVP 0204 Choose One Lab - 0LA
20231
KINESIOLOGY - LAB Selgrade, B T 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WDWRD 239 .0
Lab - 0LB
20232
KINESIOLOGY - LAB Selgrade, B R 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WDWRD 239 .0
MOVP 0205-002 (20226) PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE
MOVP 0205 PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE (3)
Designed to investigate and understand the role that exercise (muscle activity) plays on the functioning of the human body and how the body responds to exercise. A laboratory component is included.
PR Salacinski, A MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM WDWRD 234 3.0
MOVP 0205 Choose One Lab - 0LA
20233
PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE - LAB Salacinski, A M 11:30 AM-12:20 PM WDWRD 238 .0
Lab - 0LB
20234
PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE - LAB Salacinski, A W 11:30 AM-12:20 PM WDWRD 238 .0
MOVP 0211-E01 (21370) EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN
MOVP 0211 EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN (4)
This course is designed to provide the student with the theoretical understandings and practical experiences in dealing with medical emergencies. Topics included are rescue breathing, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, airway obstruction, oxygen therapy, soft tissue and internal injuries, ambulance operations, and emergency extrication. Class meets for two (2) hours of lecture and four (4) hours of laboratory. (Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to sit for the EMT-M certification examination conducted by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health Offices of Emergency Services.) Costs associated with required equipment/materials and certification fees are additional and are the responsibility of the student.
Perkins, C S 08:00 AM-12:00 PM
MW 06:30 PM-10:30 PM
WDWRD 238
WDWRD 233
4.0
MOVP 0212-001 (20328) CONCEPTS OF NUTRITION
MOVP 0212 CONCEPTS OF NUTRITION (3)
Includes basic principles of nutrition and the body�s use of nutrients. Emphasis on the effect of diet on selected health problems as well as the relationship between diet and athletic habits using a variety of established guidelines including the use of a computerized diet analysis.
Salacinski, A ONLINE 3.0
MOVP 0212-002 (20222) CONCEPTS OF NUTRITION
MOVP 0212 CONCEPTS OF NUTRITION (3)
Includes basic principles of nutrition and the body�s use of nutrients. Emphasis on the effect of diet on selected health problems as well as the relationship between diet and athletic habits using a variety of established guidelines including the use of a computerized diet analysis.
STAFF ONLINE 3.0
MOVP 0215-001 (20574) SPORT AND EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY
MOVP 0215 SPORTS AND EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY (3)
This course will require students to examine the theoretical foundations of sport and exercise psychology, as well as introduce students to the psychological skills commonly utilized in applied sport and exercise psychology. The research methods commonly utilized in sport and exercise psychology also will be considered.
PR Schwartz, D TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM WDWRD 235 3.0
MOVP 0225-001 (20573) MEDICAL TERM AND DOCUMENTATION
MOVP 0225 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY AND DOCUMENTATION (3)
Facilitates the development and application of an extensive medical vocabulary, including terms associated with structure, function, and pathology of the body systems.� Terminology of diagnosis, treatment, and medical procedures is also covered.� Basic guidelines for systems of documentation used in allied health and medicine are examined.
PR Noun, H ONLINE 3.0
MOVP 0235-004 (20223) EVAL.OF LOWER EXTREMITY INJ.
MOVP 0235 EVALUATION OF LOWER EXTREMITY INJURIES (3)
This course addresses the skills and knowledge needed to conduct a thorough clinical evaluation of injuries that commonly occur to the lower extremity in a sports/fitness environment. Two hour lecture and two hour laboratory.
PR Cacolice, P MWF 07:50 AM-09:05 AM
MWF 07:50 AM-09:05 AM
WDWRD 239
WDWRD 233
3.0
MOVP 0237-002 (20449) ATHLETIC TRNG CLIN EXPERIENCE
MOVP 0237 ATHLETIC TRAINING CLINICAL EXPERIENCE (2)
Athletic Training Education Program course with focus on the application of skills and clinical decision-making in diagnosis and immediate care of athletic injuries and illness through class discussions, structured laboratory exercises and clinical experiences. This course must be repeated once and may be repeated more than once, but no more than 4 credits may be applied to the major.
Lee Scecina, C R 10:10 AM-11:00 AM WDWRD 114 2.0
MOVP 0260-001 (20237) THEORY/PRAC TECH ED GAMES/DANC
MOVP 0260 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF TEACHING EDUCATIONAL GAMES AND DANCE IN ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY PHYSICAL EDUCATION (3)
This course provides the teacher candidate with the pedagogy for and knowledge of selected activities appropriate for the elementary and secondary levels.� The course emphasizes the skill theme approach to teaching that includes loco-motor, non-locomotor, manipulative, body management and specific sport skills through educational games.� Various dance/rhythms that are developmentally appropriate for selected grade levels will be covered.� The course will consist of lecture on theory and content.� Through micro-teaching pre-service teachers both reflect on teaching experiences and write detailed lesson plans that address management, safety, goals/objectives, informal assessment and planning for learner variability.
PR Bohler, H MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM
MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM
WDWRD 120
WDWRD 240
3.0
MOVP 0261-001 (20241) THEORY AND PRACTICE OF GAMES I
MOVP 0261 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF GAMES I: ANALYSIS OF INVASION GAMES AND STRIKING/FIELDING GAMES IN ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION (3)
Using a variety of instructional, managerial and reflective strategies, pre-service teachers will plan and implement well-structured lessons that have high learner expectations for elementary and secondary levels.� Through Game Centered Approaches, pre-service teachers will: 1) learn to create safe, collaborative, and developmentally appropriate game environments through games modification, 2) analyze and reflect on instruction and task design, as well as 3) assess student game performance.� Emphasis will be placed on developing problem-solving strategies, skill execution, and social-emotional competencies for diverse learners of all levels to challenge themselves and take ownership of learning in invasion games and field-run-score games.
PR Bohler, H MWF 12:35 PM-01:25 PM
MWF 12:35 PM-01:25 PM
WDWRD 120
WDWRD 240
3.0
MOVP 0292-001 (20242) PRIN OF GROUP EX PROGRAM
MOVP 0292 PRINCIPLES OF GROUP EXERCISE PROGRAMMING (3)
This course will highlight exercise leadership and programming through the process of teaching and instruction within various group exercise science settings. Theoretical principles related to group exercise class programming; teaching methods, class management and control, instructional media and materials, and self-evaluation are presented. In addition, a variety of group exercise modalities will be explored. This course prepares the student to take a nationally recognized group exercise certification exam.
PR Roti, M TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM WDWRD 234 3.0
MOVP 0302-001 (20227) MEASURMENT AND EVALUATION IN PE
MOVP 0302 MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (3)
In this course pre-service teachers will develop and use a variety of informal and formal methods of assessment to measure learning, understand learner's growth and knowledge development, for the development of differentiated and enhanced learning experiences, inform and improve future instruction.� They will analyze assessment data, draw conclusions, and share results.� In addition, pre-service teachers will examine the relationship between objectives, instruction, assessment, evaluation, and grading.
PR Bohler, H MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM
MWF 09:20 AM-10:10 AM
WDWRD 240
WDWRD 120
3.0
MOVP 0303-001 (21508) HEALTH EDUC.IN ELEM SCHOOL
MOVP 0303 HEALTH EDUCATION IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (3)
An investigation of current content and practices necessary for implementation of effective, integrated early childhood and elementary school health education programs. This course provides an exploration of child health status and the vital role the elementary teacher plays in enabling children to acquire healthful lifestyle behaviors as they grow and develop.
STAFF ONLINE 3.0
MOVP 0314-001 (20224) PHYS ED TEACH METH: ELEM/SEC
MOVP 0314 PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHING METHODOLOGY: ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY (3)
In this course pre-service teachers will develop well-structured lessons with appropriate sequencing and standards-based outcomes, plan and employ various teaching and assessment methodologies.� This course provides the opportunity for reflection, classroom management, communication with parents, professional development and safety considerations, with respect to elementary/secondary levels and diverse populations and how they learn.� A 40-hour pre-practicum at the elementary or secondary level is required.
PR Rausch, R MW 07:50 AM-09:05 AM
MW 07:50 AM-09:05 AM
WDWRD 120
WDWRD 235
3.0
MOVP 0319-001 (21267) MEDICAL ASPECT OF PHYS ACTVITY
MOVP 0319 GENERAL MEDICAL ASPECTS OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY (3)
This course focuses on the recognition, immediate treatment and referral of common non-orthopedic injuries and illnesses that may occur during or be exacerbated by physical activity. Medical terminology, documentation, pre-participation physical examinations, diagnostic imaging, pharmacology, standard practices for counseling intervention, and position statements regarding participation in physical activity will also be discussed.
Cacolice, P MWF 12:35 PM-01:25 PM WDWRD 234 3.0
MOVP 0320-001 (20649) FITNESS ASSMT AND EXERCISE
MOVP 0320 FITNESS ASSESSMENT AND EXERCISE PRESCRIPTION (3)
Analysis of the facets of fitness assessment and exercise prescription, based on the guidelines and certification requirements established by the American College of Sports Medicine. Students will participate in, administer, and analyze: exercise stress tests, body composition assessment, muscular strength, endurance, and flexibility tests. Concepts, principles and theories based on research from the fields of exercise physiology, kinesiology, nutrition, and tests and measurement will be applied to fitness assessment and exercise prescription.
PR Salacinski, A MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM WDWRD 234 3.0
MOVP 0323-002 (20434) THERAPEUTIC MODALITIES
MOVP 0323 THERAPEUTIC MODALITIES (3)
Examines the use of therapeutic modalities as a component of athletic injury reconditioning programs. Theory, clinical applications and legal aspects are considered. Two lectures, two hour laboratory, weekly.
PR Higgins, P MWF 08:15 AM-09:05 AM WDWRD 234 3.0
MOVP 0325-001 (20650) WOMEN AND SPORT
MOVP 0325 WOMEN AND SPORT (3)
Provides an overview of the concerns of women within the social institution of sport. The historical, socio-psychological, and physiological aspects of female sport participation will be examined and discussed. Issues related to the impact of social change within sport upon the female athlete will be addressed.
PR Schwartz, D ONLINE 3.0 UDIV
MOVP 0327-002 (20240) THERAPEUTIC EXERCISE
MOVP 0327 THERAPEUTIC EXERCISE (3)
A study of the principles and techniques associated with the planning and implementation of exercise programs designed to restore and improve musculoskeletal function. Students will learn how to develop reconditioning and rehabilitation programs including the components of range of motion, strength, stretching, joint mobilization, neuromuscular facilitation, and cardiovascular exercise. Emphasis on practical decision making related to the setting of program goals and the selection of appropriate exercises to achieve those goals. Two hour lecture and two hour laboratory.
PR Higgins, P MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM WDWRD 233 3.0
MOVP 0328-002 (20339) FITNESS.REHAB.FOR SPEC.POPULA.
MOVP 0328 FITNESS/REHAB FOR SPECIAL POPULATIONS (3)
This course will explore fitness assessment and exercise prescription for special populations. The effects of exercise on the process of aging will be examined. The special needs of those individuals with various medical conditions will be explored. Research in the areas of exercise physiology and medicine will serve as resources for the development of safe and effective exercise programs for individuals with special needs.
PR Roti, M TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM WDWRD 234 3.0
MOVP 0337-001 (20229) ATH TRNG RSCH/CLN DECSN MAKG
MOVP 0337 ATHLETIC TRAINING RESEARCH AND CLINICAL DECISION MAKING (3)
Athletic Training Education program course with focus on clinical decision making and research in prevention, evaluation, immediate care, treatment and rehabilitation of athletic injuries and illness through clinical experiences and research projects.
Cacolice, P M 10:25 AM-11:15 AM WDWRD 233 3.0
MOVP 0349-001 (21154) PRACT.II PHYS.ED.(ELEM)
MOVP 0349 PRACTICUM II IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION: ELEMENTARY (PREK-8)
(12) The full semester practicum is a supervised experience for pre-service teachers in an elementary school. The experience requires that candidates demonstrate professionalism, teach classes, develop an understanding of school and community and the links to student learning. Emphasis is on the continuity of well-structured lessons, units, and evaluation; meeting rigorous standards that inform practice; inclusivity and safety for all; and addressing needs of all students. Supervision and evaluation are conducted by the school practitioner and physical�education faculty from the university. Individual visits and conferences will be a part of the evaluation and reflective practice. �
PR STAFF ####
MOVP 0352-001 (21155) PRACT.II PHYS ED (SECONDARY)
MOVP 0352 PRACTICUM II IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION - SECONDARY (12)
Supervised observation and student teaching in a secondary school, conduct of classes and extra-curricular activities, development and understanding of school and community. Emphasis on continuity of lessons, units, daily evaluation. Supervision by cooperating school practitioner and Physical Education faculty from the University. Individual conferences and group seminars.
PR STAFF ####
MOVP 0355-001 (20786) PRAC:SEM PHYS ED
MOVP 0355 PRACTICUM SEMINAR: PHYSICAL EDUCATION (3)
The practicum seminar is taken concurrently with the practicum and offers a series of formal meetings that provide the candidates an opportunity to reflect on their experiences.� Candidates will collaborate to review, critique, and evaluate assignments and assessments linked to student learning.� they will explore creative solutions to situations in their teaching, consider ongoing research in the field, and develop professional relationships.� Identification of educational innovations, problems and suggestions for the present and future needs of candidates, school personnel, the community and physical education curricula are a pertinent part of the seminar experience.
PR STAFF W 04:00 PM-06:30 PM
Hybrid
WDWRD 236 3.0
MOVP 0360-001 (20644) SENIOR SEM IN SPORTS MEDICINE
MOVP 0360 SENIOR SEMINAR IN SPORTS MEDICINE (3)
Provides students an opportunity to examine contemporary issues and explore an area of selected interest relevant to the sports medicine field.� Requirements include completion of a portfolio documenting the student's academic and professional development and presentation of a research project.� Students will also be required to participate in dialogue session with MOVP 0213.
Pantuosco Hensch, L MW 10:25 AM-11:15 AM WDWRD 236 3.0
MOVP 0390-001 (20651) SENIOR SEM IN EXERSICE SCIENCE
MOVP 0390 SENIOR SEMINAR IN EXERCISE SCIENCE (3)
This course provides an apportunity for senior-level Exercise Science students to discuss current issues n the field as well as transition to professional practice or graduate school.� Students will participate in a civic enggaement program aligned with the Exercise Is Medicine mission to connect clinical care with community care.� Preparataion for professional certification examinations and post-graduate professional development will also be examined.
PR Roti, M TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM
TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM
WDWRD 230
WDWRD 234
3.0
MOVP 0397-001 (21152) EXERCISE SCI CAPSTONE INTERN
MOVP 0397 EXERCISE SCIENCE CAPSTONE INTERNSHIP (4-12)
Provides the student enrolled in the Exercise Science Concentration with an opportunity for further practical experience in a related field. The students will work under the supervision of an agency/institution director and will be supervised by a faculty member from the MSSLS Department. This capstone experience will include a major and minor project, case study, journal reflection and formal presentation. Individual conferences and group seminars are held in addition to the clock hours.
Roti, M
Theatre Arts
COURSE (CRN) TITLE REQ FACULTY TIME ROOM CR CORE
THEA 0104-002 (20555) INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE
THEA 0104 INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE (3)
This course is an historical survey of the origins, nature, evolutions, and development of theatre and its related arts. Students learn the theory and practice of the theatre arts, including playwriting, acting, directing, set and lighting design, theatre architecture, costuming and makeup, technical production, and theatre management. Students acquire tools with which to experience, analyze, and appreciate good theatre and the wisdom it can offer, whether as audience members or as part of theatre productions.
McNamara, J ONLINE 3.0 AAPP
THEA 0104-003 (20556) INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE
THEA 0104 INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE (3)
This course is an historical survey of the origins, nature, evolutions, and development of theatre and its related arts. Students learn the theory and practice of the theatre arts, including playwriting, acting, directing, set and lighting design, theatre architecture, costuming and makeup, technical production, and theatre management. Students acquire tools with which to experience, analyze, and appreciate good theatre and the wisdom it can offer, whether as audience members or as part of theatre productions.
STAFF TR 12:45 PM-02:00 PM ELY 212 3.0 AAPP
THEA 0104-004 (20681) INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE
THEA 0104 INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE (3)
This course is an historical survey of the origins, nature, evolutions, and development of theatre and its related arts. Students learn the theory and practice of the theatre arts, including playwriting, acting, directing, set and lighting design, theatre architecture, costuming and makeup, technical production, and theatre management. Students acquire tools with which to experience, analyze, and appreciate good theatre and the wisdom it can offer, whether as audience members or as part of theatre productions.
Crocker-Aulenback, H ONLINE 3.0 AAPP
THEA 0151-001 (20190) INTRO TO PERFORMANCE
THEA 0151 INTRODUCTION TO PERFORMANCE (3)
This course provides a perspective on and appreciation of theatre by studying the historical origins, development, and evolution of performance throughout the ages and across cultures. The course is designed for students of varying disciplines and offers a unique lens through which to view performance in theatre and in life. Students learn about the nature of performance and some of the significant theories and figures in the history of performance, and are introduced to various performance concepts, principles, and techniques, as well as different approaches to actor training. Students learn about and work on the performer�s instrument: the body, the voice, and the imagination. Many practical exercises are employed, which may include areas such as storytelling, dramatic structure, sensory work, movement, improvisation, psychophysical action, mask work, stage combat, etc. Students also will supply their knowledge and training to create performance pieces.
Parness, E MW 01:40 PM-02:55 PM DOWER 191 3.0 AAPP
THEA 0151-002 (20192) INTRO TO PERFORMANCE
THEA 0151 INTRODUCTION TO PERFORMANCE (3)
This course provides a perspective on and appreciation of theatre by studying the historical origins, development, and evolution of performance throughout the ages and across cultures. The course is designed for students of varying disciplines and offers a unique lens through which to view performance in theatre and in life. Students learn about the nature of performance and some of the significant theories and figures in the history of performance, and are introduced to various performance concepts, principles, and techniques, as well as different approaches to actor training. Students learn about and work on the performer�s instrument: the body, the voice, and the imagination. Many practical exercises are employed, which may include areas such as storytelling, dramatic structure, sensory work, movement, improvisation, psychophysical action, mask work, stage combat, etc. Students also will supply their knowledge and training to create performance pieces.
Parness, E MW 03:10 PM-04:25 PM DOWER 191 3.0 AAPP
THEA 0156-001 (21529) STAGECRAFT TECHNIQUES
THEA 0156 STAGECRAFT TECHNIQUES (3)
Stagecraft Techniques is intended to provide an introduction to the facility and tools available, and the crafts used in technical theatre today.�Students will examine some of the ways to plan and execute the technical elements of a theatrical production.�Construction techniques and terminology, the use and safe operation of tools, carpentry skills, reading blueprints, and basic hand-drafting skills are included in this course which serves as preparation for upper-level technical theater classes.
STAFF MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM DOWER 194 3.0
THEA 0252-001 (21366) ACTING I
THEA 0252 ACTING I (3)
A�course in the art and craft of the actor designed to develop�personal outer and inner resources and to practice work habits and tools to approach the actor's task with greater understanding.�The course uses readings to introduce practical, experiential, hands-on exercises employed in the classroom to develop the actor's mind, body, and voice, to cultivate a greater personal awareness of self, space, and ensemble, and to develop the imagination as a tool to generate creativity and artistry.�The course is primarily focused on the acting techniques developed by Stanislavski and his American disciples, although other approaches may also be covered.
PR Parness, E TR 09:45 AM-11:00 AM DOWER 191 3.0
THEA 0253-001 (20802) THEATRE WORKSHOP
THEA 0253 THEATRE WORKSHOP (3)
This is an intensive course for students who have acquired the basic skills of stagecraft and theatrical production, and who are interested in learning their application to the execution of theatrical designs. It is a hands-on, experiential course in which students develop and put to practical use a number of theatre and stagecraft technology skills. Students will build and paint scenery, hang and focus lights, collect and record sound, participate in costume construction, collect and build properties, and have the opportunity to serve on the running crews for the semester's theatrical offerings. Each student is required to fulfill assigned hours and to attend work calls outside of regularly scheduled class and shop hours.
Crocker-Aulenback, H MW 12:35 PM-03:35 PM ELY SHOP 3.0
THEA 0263-001 (20683) THEATRE HIST: MODERN STAGE
THEA 0263 THEATRE HISTORY: THE MODERN STAGE (3)
This course is an interdisciplinary study of the development, continuum, and evolution of Western theatre in a world cultural context. The course will focus on the agendas and legacies of key figures and movements in the development of Western theatre from the realist/naturalist movements of the nineteenth century to the world theatre of the 1940s. The relationship of Western theatre to Eastern examples, the development of the theatre as a physical structure, the development of various concepts of character and dramatic action, and the changing relationship of life on the stage to life off the stage will be examined through the study of selected dramatists, theoreticians, directors, designers, and performers.
PR STAFF TR 02:15 PM-03:30 PM ELY 220 3.0 AAPP
THEA 0354-001 (20680) COSTUME DESIGN
THEA 0354 COSTUME DESIGN (3)
Students will acquire an appreciation and an understanding of costume design as a unique form of artistic expression. Students will learn about style, about the designer�s creative process, and how to analyze and interpret play scripts and characters from the costume designer�s perspective. They will also learn about the processes of executing costume design, including the tools and techniques of costume construction. The course will provide a cultural and historical perspective, revealing how the pressures of place and time have influenced the fashions of various periods and how costume design has evolved and developed over time. Criteria will be established to enable students to evaluate and to articulate their reactions to costume designs and to the design experience.
Crocker-Aulenback, H TR 11:15 AM-12:30 PM DOWER 194 3.0
THEA 0358-001 (20265) PRODUCTION SEMINAR
THEA 0358 PRODUCTION SEMINAR (3)
A topics course. Topic will depend upon the playwright and the play chosen for production. Production Seminar is a culminating course designed to apply the skills actors, designers, and technicians learn in their performance and design/technical courses, and to provide practical experience in the mounting of a theatrical production. The course will be devoted to preparing, building, performing, and evaluating a theatrical production for a public audience.
PR Parness, E MTWR 05:30 PM-09:30 PM ELY THEA 3.0